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Biography of William Tasker

William Tasker, one of the prominent residents of Contoocook, was born August 21, 1852, in Pittsfield, this county, son of William and Mary (Lougee) Tasker. The grandfather, Joseph Tasker, and his brothers, John and Paul, removing from Newington, near Portsmouth, were the first settlers of Barnstead. Paul Tasker died leaving no family. Joseph followed the trade of shoemaker. He married Sally True, of Pittsfield, at which place they both died, he about the year 1878, and she in 1884. His son, the Rev. Joseph O. Tasker, is a Congregational minister at Short Falls, Epsom township, this county. William Tasker, Sr., another son of Joseph, born in Barnstead, Belknap County, was also a shoemaker. He was a resident of Pittsfield, where he died in 1859, at the age of forty, leaving one son, the subject of this sketch. William Tasker passed his boyhood in Pittsfield, receiving his education in the academy, and working in a store during his vacations, his father’s home being in the village. He yet owns this place, where his mother still lives. Subsequently he worked in the gristmill of Weeks Brothers, until it was burned in 1880. He then came to Contoocook, and worked for a year and a half as miller in the Pittsfield, and bought an ice business, and conducted it for five years. In 1883 he was chosen Selectman, and in the following year he was made Chairman of the Board. Among several matters of importance dealt with by the Board in the five years during which he was a member, the most noteworthy was, perhaps, the opening of a system of sewerage...

Biography of Nathaniel Tolles, M.D.

Nathaniel Tolles, M.D., was for many years one of the most prominent physicians and surgeons of Claremont. A native of Weathersfield, Vt., he was born September 17, 1805, son of John Tolles. His father, an industrious farmer, moved from Weathersfield to Claremont about the year 1819. His grandfather, Henry Tolles, was a member of Captain William Upham’s company during the Revolutionary War. Young Nathaniel Tolles availed himself of the advantages for obtaining an education offered by the Catholic Seminary in this town, then in charge of the Rev. Daniel Barber. Here he fitted for college, and was about to enter upon his classical course, when a severe illness, resulting from a too close application to study, prevented him from carrying out his purpose. Afterward, for a period, he assisted his father upon the farm in the summer and taught school in the winter. Beginning in 1827 he studied medicine under Dr. James Hall, of Windsor, Vt., for two years. Then for a short time he was under the instruction of Dr. Charles G. Adams, of Keene, N.H. Subsequently he attended lectures at Bowdoin and Dartmouth Universities; and he graduated from the last-named college in November, 1830. Immediately after leaving college, he was appointed resident physician at the South Boston Almshouse, where he remained six months. In September, 1831, he located for practice in Reading, Vt. Unable to consult more experienced colleagues of the profession owing to the remoteness of his location, he had to rely solely upon his own judgment during the first ten years of his practice. In the fall of 1841 he made a protracted visit to...

Biography of Charles S. Towle

Charles S. Towle, one of Chichester’s representative farmers, was born in this town, October 17, 1854, son of James B. and Sarah (Sherburne) Towle. His grandparents, Jonathan and Sally (Fellows) Towle, who were prosperous farming people of Chichester, had twelve children, of whom Sarah J., Betsey, Mary E., Cynthia, and Olive Jane are living. Sarah J. is the widow of George P. Haines, late of this town, and has five children-Sarah J., George H., Annie M., Albert H., and Alvin M. Betsey is the widow of the late Augustus Leavitt. Mary E. is the wife of Stephen Marston, of Pittsfield, N.H.; and her children are; Angie, Munroe, Sarah, Clara, Addie, Alice, and Adelle. Cynthia married Clark Bennett; and her children are: Clarence, Nettie, Irving, and another whose name is not known. Olive Jane is the wife of Albert Thompson, of Chichester, and has four children-Ida, Arthur, Lillia, and Augustus. Jonathan Towle in his younger years was a cooper by trade. He later gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. In politics he was a Democrat. He was over eighty years old when he died. His wife also lived to a good old age. They were members of the Baptist church. James B. Towle, the second of his parents’ children, was born in Chichester and reared to farm life. He owned a good farm in Chichester. In politics he supported the Democratic party, and in his religious views he was a Methodist. He died at the age of seventy-four years. His wife, Sarah, became the mother of seven children, five of whom are living; namely, Lewis, James F., Sarah J., Viola,...

Biography of Stephen Alden Tracy

Stephen Alden Tracy, a well-known resident of Cornish, was born here, October 31, 1833, son of Stephen and Sarah (Alden) Tracy. The family is one of the oldest in this country, and traces its descent to Lieutenant Thomas Tracy, who came from England in 1636 and settled in Connecticut. Lieutenant Tracy was son of Nathaniel and grandson of Richard Tracy, of Stanway, England. Nathaniel’s eldest brother was made a baronet by King James I. on June 29, 1611, being the thirteenth of the order created by James. The Tracy coat of arms, in the possession of the family, shows the scallop shell (indicating that some ancestor was a Crusader) between two narrow red bands, and a crest surmounted by a shell between two wings of gold, with the motto, “Memoria Pii Æterna.” The line of descent from Lieutenant Tracy is through Thomas, Jr., father of Jeremiah Tracy. Andrew, the next in descent, lived in Lisbon, Conn. He married Ruth Smith, daughter of Captain Elijah Smith, of Barnstable, Mass., and had eleven children. His son Andrew, Jr., born March 17, 1750, who died December 28, 1819, was the first to come to Cornish. This Andrew married Annie Bingham, of Windham, Conn., whose children by him were: Lemuel, Ruth, Lucy, Elias, Stephen, Anna, Andrew, and Jesse. Lemuel, born July 29, 1773, who married Phœbe Parker, had moved to Cornish with his father in 1783; and they were the first settlers of the family in this section. The Tracy homestead, which is one of the oldest houses in the town, was built in 1793. It has since been remodelled; but the solid,...

Biography of William Cutler True

William Cutler True, for many years one of the most successful farmers of Plainfield, was born May 9, 1834, son of Major Reuben and Hannah (Duncan) True. The first representatives of the True family in America came from England, settling in Salisbury, Mass., going thence to Salisbury, N.H., and from there coming to Plainfield. They were robust and self-reliant, and bore unflinchingly the sacrifices and hardships of the early days. Benjamin True, the grandfather of William C., was a prosperous farmer of Salisbury. His first marriage was contracted with a Sanborn, whose children were: Reuben, Osgood, Hannah, Sarah, Judith, Abigail, and a daughter who became Mrs. Severance, of Andover. The second time he married widow Roberts, who bore him three children-Lydia, Eunice, and Benjamin Kimball. Osgood True married Betsey Morgan, of Plainfield. He was a successful farmer, and had a family of six children. Hannah married Moses Eaton, and became the mother of a large family. Sarah became Mrs. James Severance, of Salisbury. Judith married Stephen Pingree; and one of her sons was Samuel E. Pingree, who became Governor of Vermont, and is still residing at Hartford in that State. Abigail married a Putney, and lived at Hopkinton, N.H. Major Reuben True, born at Plainfield, became a very enterprising and prosperous farmer. He was a man of rare business ability, and was prominently identified with the business and political interests of the town. He served the public in nearly all the town offices, was Selectman many times, and was sent as Representative to the legislature. He was a leading member in the Baptist church and a generous supporter of...

Biography of Henry Tubbs

Henry Tubbs, a successful dentist practising in Newport, was born in Peterboro, N.H., February 24, 1831, son of Joseph and Azuba (Monroe) Tubbs. The family is traced back to one William Tubbs, who came to the Plymouth Colony from London, England, in 1635. The paternal grandfather of Dr. Tubbs was Captain Joseph Tubbs, of Marlow, N.H., an early settler, a successful farmer, a good citizen, and a Captain in the old State militia. He died at the age of eighty years. Joseph Tubbs, son of Captain Tubbs, in company with Thomas Baker owned the Eagle Mills at Peterboro, N.H., where he manufactured cotton goods, ginghams, etc., from the rough cotton. Successful at first, the firm met with disasters from various causes; and the business was wound up after several years of existence. Joseph Tubbs then turned his May 22, 1859, at the age of seventy years and three months. His wife was a daughter of Dr. Joseph Monroe, of Hillsborough. She died at Hancock, N.H., January 16, 1871, at the age of seventy-five years and eight months. They were both Unitarians. They had six children, of whom three are deceased, namely: Thomas B., who died in 1894, seventy-nine years old; Elijah M. Tubbs, who died in 1881, fifty-eight years old; and Mrs. Sarah W. Merriman, who died at the age of fifty-five years. The others are: Mrs. Maria T. Blood, who resides in Hancock, N.H.; Louisa A., also a resident of Hancock; and Henry, the subject of this sketch. Henry Tubbs, the subject of this sketch, the youngest of his parents’ children, was a student for a time in...

Biography of Rev. John Vannevar

Rev. John Vannevar, born in South Malden, now Everett, Mass., on June 23, 1857, was the youngest of three children of Aaron B. and Dorothy G. Vannevar, both of whom were born in Amherst, Mass. He lived in the place of his birth until twelve years of age, when the family moved to Summer Street, Malden. He was educated in the public schools, completing the college course in the Malden High School and graduating in 1876. He then entered Tufts College, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1880, and taking a post-graduate course of one year. He was ordained to the work of the Christian ministry of the Universalist church in the home church of that faith in Malden on November 23, 1880. Called to the pastorate of the Universalist society in Amesbury in the summer of 1881, he remained there two years, during which period he was married to Gertrude F. Swasey, of Malden. Because of impaired health the winter of 1883 and 1884 was spent in Florida. Soon after returning, he accepted a call to the pastorate of the First Universalist Society of Canton, Mass., where were born a son and a daughter. In the winter of 1887, because of a bronchial affection, a leave of absence was granted him; and he spent a portion of the cold season in Southern California, but was suddenly called home by the illness of Mrs. Vannevar’s mother. The month of March was passed in Lakewood, N.J., where so much benefit was received that pastoral work was immediately resumed. In the fall of 1892 he resigned the Canton...

Biography of John Tyler

John Tyler was well known in Claremont as an inventor and builder. He was a son of John Tyler and a grandson of Benjamin Tyler, both eminent mechanics. Benjamin, who settled in Claremont in the spring of 1776, built the first dam across the Sugar River at West Claremont, and was for many years one of the most public-spirited men in town. The History of Claremont gives the following facts concerning his grandson:- “John Tyler was born in Claremont, March 26, 1818. He learned the trade of millwright, serving an apprenticeship of seven years, and was then for eight years foreman of the shop where he learned his trade in Barre, Vt. West Lebanon in 1850, and for several years did a large business in building mills, sometimes employing fifty men. He returned to Claremont in 1872, where he has since resided. He was engineer and superintendent in building the Sugar River paper-mill, and was a principal stockholder and the President of the company. “Mr. Tyler is the inventor of the Tyler turbine water-wheel, which he had patented in 1856, and which he manufactured for many years. His was the first iron water-wheel made, and nine different patents were subsequently granted him for improvements upon it. These wheels found their way all over the country, some of them also finding their way abroad; and for years they were considered the best turbine wheels manufactured, this fact being thoroughly developed some years ago by a comparative and competitive test of the products of other makers of similar wheels. He was also the inventor and patentee of Tyler’s copper cylinder washer...

Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from the injuries resulting from the kick of a horse. The mother still survives. Frank T. Vaughan spent twelve years of his early life with his father in Canada, where he received his early education. After graduating from the St. Johnsbury...

Biography of Rufus Virgin

Rufus Virgin, a prosperous farmer and well-known citizen of Concord, was born on the Virgin homestead, where he now resides, January 7, 1818, son of Isaac and Susan (Batchelder) Virgin. He is a descendant of Ebenezer Virgin, second, one of the old proprietors of New Hampshire. The Virgin family has been closely identified with the history of Concord since the town was first settled. Jonathan Virgin, grandfather of Rufus, took up new land here, cleared it, and became the owner of a large farm. He died at about sixty years of age. His wife, in maidenhood Sarah Austin, was the mother of four sons and one daughter. Isaac Virgin was brought up to agricultural pursuits, and received his education in the district school. The school-house was a long distance from the farm; but, not discouraged by that, he was a regular attendant as well as a diligent student. When he came into possession of the farm, which he did previous to the War of 1812, he built a substantial set of buildings, which are standing to-day, but little the worse for the ravages of time. He died June 12, 1870, Susan, was born March 4, 1790, and died in 1876. She was the mother of four children-Susan C., Eliza J., Rufus, and William H. Susan C. married the Rev. Caleb Fales, a Methodist minister, and died not long after her marriage. Eliza J. became the wife of W. K. Holt, of Loudon, but is now deceased. William died at the age of seventeen. Rufus Virgin received a public-school education, and also studied at a select private school. He has...
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