A Description Of The Jersey Sonnett

A Description Of The Jersey Sonnet – Suggested By A Vision Of The Jersey Prison Ship



Old Jersey Ship

“We have ourselves examined many of the skulls lying on the shore. From the teeth they appeared to be the remains of men in the prime of life.” – General Johnson Of all the ships that were ever launched the “Old Jersey” is the most notorious. Never before or since, in the dark annals of



Captain Roswell Palmer

“The remains were huddled into blankets, and so slightly interred on the neighboring slope that scores of them, bared by the rains, were always visible to their less fortunate comrades left to pine in hopeless captivity.” – Captain Roswell Palmer In the year 1865 a son of Captain Roswell Palmer, of Connecticut, wrote a letter



The Narrative Of Captain Alexander Coffin

“There were two or three hospital-ships near the prison-ships; and so soon as any of the prisoners complained of being sick, they were sent on board of one of them; and I verily believe that not one out of a hundred ever returned or recovered.” – Captain Alexander Coffin In 1807 Dr. Mitchell, of New



A Wonderful Deliverance

“I have since found that the whole world is but one great prison-house of guilty, sorrowful, and dying men, who live in pride, envy, and malice, hateful, and hating one another.” – Rev. Thomas Andros There are few records of religious feeling on board the “Jersey, vulgarly called ‘Hell.’” No clergyman was ever known to



The Narrative Of Captain Dring

“Memory still brings before me those emaciated beings, moving from the Galley with their wretched pittance of meat; each creeping to the spot where his mess was assembled, to divide it with a group of haggard and sickly creatures, their garments hanging in tatters round their meagre limbs, and the hue of death upon their



The Interment Of The Dead

“The first of the crew of the Chance to die was a lad named Palmer, about twelve years of age, and the youngest of our crew.” – Captain Dring Captain Dring continues his narrative by describing the manner in which the dead were interred in the sand of the Wallabout. Every morning, he says, the



Dame Grant And Her Boat

“One indulgence was allowed us by our keepers, if indulgence it can be called. They had given permission for a boat to come alongside the ship, with a supply of a few necessary articles, to be sold to such of the prisoners as possessed the means of paying for them. This trade was carried on



The Supplies For The Prisoners

“As the disgust at swallowing any food which had been cooked in the Great Copper was universal, each person used every exertion to procure as much wood as possible.” – Captain Dring “After the death of Dame Grant, we were under the necessity of purchasing from the Sutler such small supplies as we needed. This



Fourth Of July On The Jersey

“The poor, helpless prisoners retreated from the hatchways, as far as their crowded situation would permit, while their cowardly assailants followed as far as they dared, cutting and wounding every one within reach, and then ascended to the upper deck, exulting in the gratification of their revenge.” – Captain Dring A few days before the



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