Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of George W. Pearcy

GEORGE W. PEARCY. Ability, when backed by enterprising business measures and progressive ideas, will accomplish more than any other professional or commercial requirement. An illustration of this is found in the mercantile establishment owned and conducted by George W. Pearcy at Thornfield, MO. This gentleman was born in Platte County, Missouri, in 1848, but his parents, William H. and Jane (Henry) Pearcy, were born in Kentucky in 1813 and Indiana in 1818, respectively. After their marriage, which occurred in Indiana, they came to Platte County, Missouri, later removed to Dallas County, and when the subject of this sketch was four or five years old they came to Ozark County, locating on a farm on Bryant’s Fork where the mother died in 1858. The father afterward removed to Benton County, Arkansas, and later to Johnson County, where he died in 1877, having been a farmer throughout life, and in every sense of the word a self-made man. His father, George Pearcy, was of English descent, was a music teacher by occupation, and died in Platte County, Missouri Nothing is known of the maternal grandfather. After the death of his first wife, William H. Pearcy married again, his second wife being Eliza Scrivner, by whom he had two children: Samantha and Lafayette of Laclede County. George W. Pearcy, the immediate subject of this notice, is the fifth of eight children born to his parents: John W., who died in Indian Territory in 1862; Mary A., who resides in Texas; Sarah J. (Mrs. Baker) of California; Isabella, who died in Ozark County in 1862; George W.; Winfield Scott, who died in Dallas...

Biography of C. C. Hudson

C. C. HUDSON. Many of the most active and enterprising residents of Newton County are natives of the same, and have here spent the greater part of their lives. In them we find men of true loyalty to the interests of this part of the State who understand as it were by instinct the needs, social and industrial, of this vicinity, and who have a thorough knowledge of its resources. They are, therefore, better adapted to succeed here than a stranger could be and are probably without exception warmly devoted to the prosperity of their native place. Mr. C. C. Hudson, a successful farmer and stockraiser of Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, was born in this county, in 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Billah) Hudson, both natives of Tennessee, the former born about 1811, and the later in 1818. When about seven years of age the father was brought by his parents to Lawrence County, Arkansas, and he there grew to mature years, married and made his home until 1832, when he came to what is now Newton County, Arkansas He cut his way through the unbroken forest, then inhabited by Indians and wild animals, and located on the creek that bears his name, three miles above Jasper, where he was the first white settler. He became one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of the county, and followed farming and stockraising exclusively until 1860, when he built a grist mill above Mount Parthenon. This he operated until 1873, when he built a mill where Matlock’s Mill now stands, and conducted this for eight...

Biography of Albert Hodges

ALBERT HODGES. Albert Hodges is an attorney at law of wide reputation, a man of unquestioned integrity, a close reasoner and a profound thinker. He is a Missourian by birth, and has inculcated in him the sterling principles of the better class of citizens of the State. He was born in Taney County (afterward Douglas County), November 2, 1848, and is a son of Edmond and Sarah (Garrison) Hodges, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Warren County, Indiana, born in 1827. The grandfather, John Hodges, was a native of Kentucky, and the family moved from that State to Indiana at an early date, and thence to Missouri in 1835- After reaching the latter State, the grandfather settled at the mouth of Beaver Spring Creek, in Taney County, afterward Douglas and Taney Counties, and followed farming the rest of his life. He was one of the earliest pioneers of that section. His son, the father of our subject, followed in his footsteps and became an agriculturist. He is still living on the tract of land where he settled many years ago, in Douglas County. In 1846 he married Miss Sarah Garrison and immediately afterward began his career as an agriculturist. He has met with unusual success and has a fine farm of 360 acres, the same being an ornament to the county. During the Civil War he enlisted in the Union Army, Twenty-fifth Regiment, and served for six months. Mr. Hodges is one of the influential men of his section, is public-spirited and enterprising, and gives his hearty support to all worthy movements. Mrs. Hodges died...

Biography of Jesse N. Nelson

JESSE N. NELSON. The business in which Jesse N. Nelson is engaged is a most important one, and he has found that since engaging in it his time has been fully occupied. He is the proprietor of a mill and cotton-gin at Buford and as a means of livelihood he has found that this occupation has been reasonably successful. He is a native of Pontotock (now Lee) County, Miss.. born February 8, 1858, a son of William and Martha (Carter) Nelson, both of whom were born in Mississippi, and were there reared, educated and married. In 1870 they removed to Arkansas and located in the vicinity of Buford on a woodland farm which he cleared and tilled until his death, being also engaged in cotton-ginning and merchandising. He was a shrewd and far-seeing man of affairs, made a success of nearly everything he undertook, and eventually became wealthy. He met with some reverses, for his mill and gin were once burned downed and at another time they were blown down; but his energy soon retrieved these losses. Throughout the Civil War he was a member of Forrest’s cavalry, serving in the capacity of captain part of the time, and was a participant in many battles. He returned to the pursuits of civil life after the war was over, became well and favorably known throughout the northern part of the State and counted his friends in his own community by the score. It was largely through his influence that the post office at Buford was established, and in other ways he showed himself to be a public spirited-citizen. He was...

Biography of Preston A. C. Wallace

PRESTON A. C. WALLACE. An active and progressive system in any profession or line of business, when based upon principles of honor, is sure to bring success, and an illustration of prominence gained through these means is seen in the record of Preston A. C. Wallace, of Heber, Arkansas He was born in Williamson County, Tennessee, in 1841, and is a son of Alfred F. and Ann (Moore) Wallace, who were born in Alabama, from which State they moved to Tennessee, thence to Arkansas in 1841, locating in Independence County. The father died there in 1848, after which his widow married Archibald Burns, and died in Stone County. Mr. Wallace was a well to-do farmer, and during the Mexican War was captain of a company in Col. Yell’s regiment. Preston A. C. Wallace was one of four children, was the youngest of the family and is the only one now living. He spent his boyhood in the vicinity of Batesville, in Independence County, and owing to the early death of his father saw many ups and downs before the war, and since the early age of thirteen years has fought the hard battle of life on his own responsibility. In April, 1863, he joined an independent company, which formed a part of Maj. Christman’s battalion, and held the rank of orderly sergeant throughout the war. He was in all the engagements of the Missouri raid, from Ironton to Fayetteville, was a brave, faithful and useful soldier, but was compelled to leave the service in the spring of 1863, after which he returned home and commenced anew the occupation of...

Biography of George M. Follett

GEORGE M. FOLLETT. The creditable condition of business life in West Plains, Missouri, is due in a great extent to the enterprise, energy and intelligence of her prominent merchants and manufacturers. Among these may be mentioned the firm of Holt & Follett, manufacturers. George M. Follett was born and reared just outside of the city of New York, his birth occurring February 25, 1852, son of D. B. and Eliza (Mason) Follett. The father was a farmer and resided on the Delaware River. Our subject passed his boyhood and youth on the old home farm and received but limited educational advantages. Early in life he started in the lumber business, working in the lumber fields of West Pennsylvania and those of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, and continued there until 1883, when he came to south Missouri. Here he took a position with the South Missouri Land Company, and had charge of a planing mill at Willow Springs. A year later he took charge of the Burnham Mills as engineer. He is a practical engineer and electrician. He remained at the Burnham Mills until September, 1888, and then went to Winona, Missouri, where he took a position with the Ozark Lumber Company, holding the same one year. Following this he bought a saw mill south of Winona and continued this until 1891, when he came to West Plains and opened a lumber yard, in company with Mr. Holt. Since then they have been in business together and are doing well. Mr. Follett has been in lumber business about twenty-five years and thoroughly understands the same. The firm is doing all...

Biography of James Augustus Carter

JAMES AUGUSTUS CARTER. This gentleman is the able and efficient editor of the Baxter County Citizen, a paper published in the interests of the section and of the Democrat party. It is a breezy, spicy sheet and from its columns something useful and interesting may always be gleaned, especially in the editorial department, for Mr. Carter is a forceful and elegant writer and does not hesitate to give his unbiased opinion of all matters of public interest. He is a native of Pontotoc County, Miss., where he was born October 30, 1858, a son of Benjamin F. and Mary C. (Dixon) Carter, who were born in Mississippi and South Carolina, respectively. The father died in 1861 while serving in the Confederate Army at the untimely age of twenty-seven years, and his widow afterward married J. M. Wylie, with whom she moved to Arkansas in 1868, locating seven miles south of Mountain Home, where she died a few days after her arrival. The subject of this sketch received his education in the Mountain Home High School, and after finishing his scholastic course he was engaged in teaching for a few years. In 1882 he was elected county assessor, was reelected in 1884, and after the expiration of his term of office he engaged in mercantile pursuits with A. A. Wolf, with whom he was associated eighteen months. He then purchased the Baxter County Citizen in July, 1886, at which time the circulation of the paper was but 350, but under his management this has increased to 1,000 or more, and the patronage is continually growing. Mr. Carter has always worked...

Biography of George W. Osburn, M. D.

GEORGE W. OSBURN, M. D. The life of the popular, successful physician is one of incessant toil, self-denial and care, yet all true followers of the “healing art” strive to attain prominence in their profession, regardless of added burdens which will rest upon their shoulders. Such a man is George W. Osburn, who was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., November 15, 1841, a son of Ectyl and Cynthia (Nelson) Osburn (see sketch of Dr. M. H. Osburn). George W. attended the common schools of Georgia, was brought up to the healthy and useful life of the farmer, and when the great Civil War came up was forced into the Confederate service, but shortly after managed to make his escape and refugeed to Ohio, making his home in Cincinnati from 1863 to 1864, when he went to Chicago, later to the city of New York, and then back again to Chicago, where he made his home until 1868. He was engaged in carpentering and helped to build many of the early houses of that city. In 1868 he became a resident of Berry County, Missouri, but two years later located at Thornfield, in Ozark County, and in 1871 on the farm where he now lives in Douglas County, ten miles south of Ava. His farm consists of 690 acres, and he has now 200 acres under cultivation, although but small improvement had been made on the place at the time of his purchase. His farm is an exceptionally valuable one, and is especially well adapted to stockraising, to which much of his attention is devoted. In 1868 he began the...

Biography of William C. Morrison

WILLIAM C. MORRISON. This gentleman is the efficient collector of Ozark County, Missouri, a position he has held since 1889, and from 1887 to 1888 he discharged the duties of county assessor. He owes his nativity to the Blue Grass State, his birth occurring in Barren County, June 10, 1842, his parents, Joseph S. and Nancy J. (Low) Morrison, being also natives of that State. The paternal grandfather, Steptoe Morrison, was a native of the Palmetto State, but was an early emigrant to Barren County, Kentucky, and later to Arkansas, in which State he spent his last days. Solomon Low, the maternal grandfather, was a Virginian, and became a pioneer settler of Barren County, Kentucky Joseph S. Morrison was born in 1826 or 1827, and when the Civil War came up he enlisted in the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, and being a skillful blacksmith, he was made chief of the blacksmith corps of his regiment. He served from July, 1861, until his death which occurred at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1863, having proved himself a brave, faithful and conscientious soldier. He was a Master Mason, was a stanch Republican in politics, and was a man of unblemished reputation. His widow died in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1886, having become the mother of eight children: William C.; Sarah E., who died at the age of fifteen years; John, who also died young; Abigail resides in Barren County, Kentucky, and is the wife of R. Rinick; Martha A. became the wife of John T. Fords, and died in Barren County, in 1892; Solomon M. is a resident of Metcalf County, Kentucky, and the...

Biography of William E. McDowell

WILLIAM E. McDOWELL. Given the ordinary average of intelligence and good judgment’ and a fair education, any man may make a success in the avenues of trade. In the profession of law he must be endowed with superior intelligence and have gone through years of careful study and training to be able to cope with the brilliant minds which do honor to the bench and bar. William E. McDowell, attorney at law, of Galena, Missouri, is a gentleman of well-known ability and one who is an ornament to the profession. He is a native of Stone County, born one mile above the mouth of Flat Creek, at the old town site of Cape Fair, January 31, 1840. That town was undermined and fell in, and was completely destroyed during a big flood, about the year 1855. He is a son of Wiley and Margaret (Williams) McDowell. The former was born in Simpson County, Kentucky, in 1814, moved to Stone County, Missouri, in 1838, and settled on a farm one mile below the mouth of Flat Creek, near where the town of Cape Fair is now situated. There he lived until 1854, when he moved to another farm three miles southwest of Galena, on which he made his home until his death in January, 1875, at the age of sixty-one years. His father, John McDowell, of English descent, was for many years a resident of Simpson County, Kentucky, and died there in 1873. The mother of William E. McDowell was born in Simpson County, Kentucky, and in 1830 was married to Wiley McDowell, with whom she came to Missouri in...
Page 3 of 6612345678910...2030...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest