Mohawk Church, Brantford, Ontario, Canada

Mohawk Church, Brantford, Ontario, Canada

When a young man Thayendanegea or Joseph Brant, a Mohawk Pine Tree Chief, perceived the importance of education and religion as aids in carrying forward the moral and social improvement of his nation. One of his first stipulations, on securing Grand River Territory for his people, was the building of a church, a school house



Logan Elm And Monument, Circleville, Ohio

Logan, Chief of the Mingoes, was a Cayuga Indian, born at Auburn, New York in 1726. He was the son of Chief Shikellamy, deputy of the Six Nations over the Indians at a section of Pennsylvania. Like his father, Logan was a firm friend of the white man. Upon moving to Ohio, Logan was made



Kateri Tekakwitha, Mohawk Women, Auriesville, New York

Catherinae Tekakwitha Virginis 1690

This Indian girl has been called, the Indian saint. She was born in 1656 at Candaouga, a Mohawk Village located on the south bank of the Mohawk River near where Auriesville now stands. Later she moved with her parents to Caughnawaga, a village of the Turtle Clan, located on the north side of the Mohawk



Kaiiontwa-Ken, Cornplanter

Cornplanter known as John O’Bail, was born in the village of Conewaugus sometime around the year 1732. Because of the influence of this chief the Senecas did not join the western Indians as Wayne’s army marched against them. The Senecas, who flanked Wayne’s advance, were in a position to bring about his defeat. Had they



Oneida Chief Shikellamy

Appletons' Swatane

With To-re-wa-wa-kon ‘Paul Wallace’ as a guide, the Mohawks headed over a road, that once was an Indian trail, toward the north. Their route was over a beautiful country of hills and valleys. With their friend they soon reached the beautiful Susquehanna River Valley. At Sunbury, Pa. they visited the site of the cabin of



Grave Of Tenh-Wen-Nyos, Governor Blacksnake, Allegany Reserve

Leaving the monument of Pauline Johnson, the Mohawks headed for the nearby City of Brantford. There in one of the city parks they saw a gigantic monument, said to be the largest in Canada, erected to the Mohawk Chief, Thayendangea. The inscription on this monument was as follows: “The last resting place of Tenh-wen-nyos ‘Awl



The Great Central Trail Of The Long House, Route 5, New York

The Iroquois Indians were the trail makers for the early settlers of New York State and its surrounding territory. The white people landed here, strangers in a strange land. They met the Indian who was a woodsman without an equal. The Iroquois knew his country. He knew water courses, elevations and passes through the mountains.



The Forest Theater, Ticonderoga, New York

Forest Theater Annual Indian Pageant

Near the shore of Lake Champlain stands a beautiful pine and hemlock grove, the site of an ancient Indian village. Here, every August, is held an Indian pageant based on the lives of famous Six Nation Chiefs and warriors. This Indian pageant has grown from a handful of actors to a cast of as high



Ely S. Parker Homestead, Tonawanda Reservation

Ely S. Parker Homestead

Ely Parker was a Seneca Indian of the Wolf Clan. He was born on the Tonawanda Seneca Reservation in 1832. His boyhood name was Hasanoanda ‘Coming to the Front’. Later he was made a chief of his clan and received the title, Do-ne-ho-ga-weh ‘He Holds The Door Open’. Ely Parker received an academic education and



Emily Pauline Johnson, Mohawk Poetess, Six Nation Country

Pauline Johnson Monument

Mary Anderson Longboat, an Indian of the Six Nations Reservation, says the following of this remarkable woman: “We of the Six Nations Reserve, honour our Indian poetess, Emily Pauline Johnson. She is more than just a memory, for she lives today in her books which are read throughout the world. In her lifetime, her recitations



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