Tribes of the West Indies and Northern Provinces of South America

Tribes of the West Indies and Northern Provinces of South America



The Sioux, or Dacotah

Tokakon A Sioux Brave Signifies "He that inflicts the first wound"

An accurate classification of the American Indians, either founded upon dissimilarities in the language of different tribes, or upon differences in physical peculiarities, is impossible, particularly in treating of the scattered and wandering people of the far west. The races vary by such slight shades of distinction, and such analogies exist between their languages, that



The Sioux Massacre, Minnesota

Fort Ridgley Burning

The Sioux massacre of the whites in Minnesota in August, 1862, is one of the bloodiest that has ever occurred in the history of the Indian races in North America. In the earlier periods of the country, the frontier settlements were constantly exposed to. Indian depredations, and their destruction at any time seemed probable from



The Patagonians of South America

The Patagonians of South America



The Pampas Indians of South America

The Pampas Indians of South America



The Knisteneaux or Cree and Chippewa

The Knisteneaux or Cree and Chippewa



Indian Tribes of Brazil

Indian Tribes of Brazil



1847 Indian Population of the United States and Territory

According to the census taken, under the agency of Mr. Henry K. Schoolcraft, in pursuance of the act of Congress passed in March 1847, the following returns were made of the numbers of the Indian tribes subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The grand total was set down at 388,229, and about 30,000



Indians of Guiana and Venezuela

Indian Tribes of Guiana

The tribes who inhabit the wilderness between the Amazon and the seacoast settlements at the north, upon the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic, have been classified as belonging to the same family with the aboriginal inhabitants of Brazil. The race has been denominated the “Brasilio Guaarani,” and has been divided into the nations of Guarani,



Indians of Jamaica and Southern Coast of Cuba

Columbus Landing on Hispaniola

In the month of May 1494, the island of Jamaica was first discovered by Columbus. The native inhabitants appeared to be of a very different character from the timid and gentle islanders with whom former intercourse had been held. A crowd of canoes, filled with savages gaudily adorned with plumes and paint, opposed the landing



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