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The Ogden Land Claim

The New York Indians And The Seneca Leases. We regard the Allegany and Cattaraugus reservations, in their so called “government by their own council for these last years, as a notorious instance of the corruption and misuse of funds by Indians, to which we have referred above. The reports of committees of Congress, of inspectors, and of commissions, as well as facts presented by representatives of the council before the House Committee on Indian Affairs, give unquestionable evidence of such corruption. We last year urgently recommended the passage of a law requiring all lease moneys to be made payable to and recoverable by the United States Indian agent, to be by him paid to individual Indians; the agent being required to account for the same, and that such moneys be no longer payable to the council of the Indians, several of whose members and officers have been proved to have been systematically corrupt and dishonest for a period of years. Such a bill (known as the Ryan Act) was passed at the last session of Congress and became a law. But its passage was delayed until after the beginning of the fiscal year for this lease system, and representatives of the Indian council have collected a part of the lease money for the current year. A recent letter from the New York Indian agent, says: “From what I can learn, I am of the opinion that the Seneca Nation treasurer collected a very large proportion of the rents for the year 1901 before the Ryan Act became operative.” Further efforts have been made by members of the Indian council...

Report of the Purchasing Committee

Purchase And Shipping Of Supplies. The increase in promptness in purchasing and shipping supplies for the last two years has been noticeable. Members of the board were in attendance to assist at the opening of bids at Chicago, in April, 1901, and at New York in May, 1901; and one or more of the commissioners were in daily attendance, as a rule, to assist in inspecting samples and awarding contracts during the six or seven weeks required in this business. The report of the purchasing committee of our board is herewith, submitted as Appendix A. A report from the chairman of this board upon certain deliveries of clothing for the Indians at the New York warehouse, which were decidedly below samples and bids, is also submitted with this report as Appendix B. Four Indian Warehouses Are Not Needed. We are of opinion that the maintenance of four separate warehouses at Omaha, San Francisco, Chicago, and New York for the purchase and shipping of Indian supplies involves entirely needless expense. We respectfully renew our suggestion made in preceding reports that the business of the opening of bids, the examination of samples, and the awarding of contracts could be done at Washington with great advantage to the service and a marked reduction in expenditures. The Open Sore Of The Service Unfit Agents Appointed Or Held In Position By Political Influence. We are compelled to express once more our conviction as a Board that the greatest practical need of the Indian Service in the matter of administration is the wise choice of suitable men as Indian agents, the quick redress of manifest...

Report of the Business Committee

Fifth session, Friday morning, October 18. The platform was presented by Dr. Lyman Abbott, chairman of the business committee. Platform. Report Of The Business Committee. The nineteenth annual session of the Lake Mohonk Indian Conference congratulates the country on the gratifying evidence of healthy progress and important results attendant upon efforts that have been put forth in recent years for the education and elevation of the Indian race, seen in a Federal school system providing for the education of upward of 25,000 Indian children and the allotment of over 6,500,000 acres of land to over 55,000 Indians, with a secure individual title, and in the possession by these Indians of all the rights, privileges, and immunities of citizenship. We note with special satisfaction the action of the Department of the Interior, since our last meeting, in issuing regulations for licensing and solemnizing marriages of Indians, for keeping family records of all agencies, and for preventing polygamous marriages. There still remain evils to be corrected and work to be done. The frequent changes in the Indian service, involving both removals and appointments for purely political reasons, lead us to suggest to the President the propriety of framing and promulgating some rules prescribing such methods in nominating agents as will put an end to this abuse. The same pressure for patronage operates to delay or prevent the abolition of needless agencies. Congress, at its last session, acting on the recommendation of the Indian Commissioner, abolished three such agencies. There are at least half a score more which, in the judgment of experts, should be abolished as sinecures which not only involve...

Nineteenth Lake Mohonk Indian Conference

Proceedings Of The Board Of Indian Commissioners At The Nineteenth Lake Mohonk Indian Conference. [Addresses and proceedings which concern the Indians are included in this appendix.] First session, Wednesday. October 16, 1901. The Nineteenth Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian was called to order after morning prayers, which were conducted by Rev. Dr. Theodore L. Cuyler, at 10 a. m. Wednesday, October 16, 1901. The guests were welcomed by Mr. A. K. Smiley, the generous host of the occasion, in the following words: Ladies And Gentlemen: The time has arrived for the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Friends of the Indian. I am not sure but we shall have to change that name. These friends are friends of other peoples besides the Indians. I can not begin to tell you how much pleasure it gives me to welcome you here. To see a company of men and women, with earnest hearts and clear brains, coming together to discuss the elevation of different races of people, and the best way of doing it, is to me an intense delight. I believe all good causes can be best promoted by the friendly, earnest, open discussion of people holding different views, comparing notes, and then arriving at some conclusion. We have always had open and free discussion here, and at the end we have come to some conclusion in which we could agree, owing to the fact that there were peacemakers as well as wise heads among us. I have great hopes for the success of this conference. There are here this morning just an even hundred invited guests, with...

Progress of the Year in Indian Affairs, Memoranda

Fourth session, Thursday night, October 17 Progress Of The Year In Indian Affairs. Memoranda. Finance, The appropriations for the Indian service for the current fiscal year aggregate $9,736,186.09, an increase of nearly $700,000 over last year. The increase is caused by payments for Indian land and the capitalization of annuity funds. Education. The need of a compulsory school law applicable to Indians is reiterated. Not that force would be frequently resorted to, or that it would be harshly used, but to give a more authoritative backing to the moral suasion now used. The superintendent of Haskell Institute, Lawrence, Kans., reports that 176 out of 180 agents, school superintendents, and school supervisors favor such a law. Idaho has already passed an act ” compelling the attendance of children at schools where tuition, lodging, food, and clothing are furnished at the expense of the United States or the State of Idaho.” Punishment for noncompliance is to be by fines varying from $5 to $30. This law, passed last March, has not yet been tested. In the Government schools (25 non-reservation, 88 reservation boarding, and 138 day) 23,332 pupils have been enrolled, an increase of 1,208 over last year. In the mission schools, including Hampton (the only existing contract school), the enrollment has been 3,933. Twenty-one public schools have had 257 pupils, a very small increase over last year. Thus the whole number of Indian pupils in schools last year was 27,522, and an average attendance of over 83 per cent was secured. Not-withstanding the discontinuance of Indian school contracts, the total number of pupils cared for last year was 1,071 greater...

President Gates Opens last Session

Sixth session, Friday night, October 18. After the singing of a hymn by Mr. Frank Wright the last session of the conference was called to order at 8 o’clock. President Gates. In the words and the music of the beautiful Christian song to which we have just listened, fraught as they are with tender feeling, there is nothing incongruous with the practical aims and the careful discussions of our conference. On the contrary, we can not see our work in its true light unless we look upon our efforts for the less favored races in the heavenly light of that uplifting hope which has traversed the world since the “Light of the World” was lifted up on Calvary. It is only in the light of His teaching that the brotherhood of men and the blessed fellowship of unselfish service have begun to be revealed to the nations have taken captive the heart and life of His chosen servants, the world’s truest benefactors in all the ages. In one of those moments of unexpected and delightful interchange of thought about the highest and best objects, which, coming suddenly to us in flashes of social intercourse here, are a chief charm of these conferences, a friend who has done loving work of investigation in the history of Christian missionary effort was speaking with me today of the glorious impressiveness of the great fact that there had been no dark ages and no dark century in the history of the Church of Christ, no period in which the true missionary spirit had not lightened the gloom. There is an unbroken succession^ truly...

List of Officers Connected with the United States Indian Service

List Of Officers Connected With The United States Indian Service, Including Agents, Superintendents, Inspectors, Special Agents, And Supervisors Of Indian Schools. [Corrected to February 20, 1902.] William A. Jones, Commissioner 1334 Vermont avenue A. Clarke Tonner, Assistant Commissioner 1916 Sixteenth street N W. Miss Estelle Reel, superintendent of Indian schools Arlington Hotel Chiefs Of Divisions. Finance Samuel E. Slater 1415 S street NW, Land Chas. F. Larrabee 1514 Twenty-first street NW. Accounts Chas. H. Dickson. 201 A street SE. Education Josiah H. Dortch 2931 Fifteenth street N W. Files Lewis Y. Ellis 101 Eleventh street SE. Miscellaneous M. S. COOK, stenographer in charge 1328 Twelfth street NW. Inspectors. Walter H. Graves Colorado Cyrus Beede Iowa James McLaughlin North Dakota J. George Wright South Dakota Charles F. Nesler New Jersey Arthur M. Tinker Massachusetts James E. Jenkins Iowa Special Agents. Samuel L. Taggart Iowa Eugene MacComas Illinois Daniel W. Manchester Ohio Charles S. McNicnols Arizona Frank M. Conser Ohio Supervisors Of Indian Schools. Albert O. Wright Wisconsin Edwin L. Chalcraft Washington Millard F. Holland Maryland John Charles (Construction) Wisconsin Egbert M. Pringle (Engineering) Missouri Superintendents Of Indian Warehouses. Koger C. Spooner 235 Johnson Street, Chicago, Ill. Louis L. Bobbins 77 And 79 Wooster Street, New York, N. Y. Richard C. Jordan 815 And 817 Howard Street, Omaha, Nebr. Superintendent Insane Asylum, Canton, S. Dak. Oscar S. Gifford South Dakota Members Of The Board Of Indian Commissioners, With Their Post-Office Addresses. Darwin K. James, Chairman 226 Gates Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Merrill E. Gates, Secretary 1429 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C. Albert K. Smiley Mohonk Lake, N. Y. E. Whittlesey...

Indian Territory Under the Curtis Act and Subsequent Legislation

Education. Under the Government supervision which has been exercised for three years great improvements have been made in the schools among the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, and Chickasaws and the antagonism with which Government oversight was at first received is growing less. Normal schools and examinations have raised the grade of teachers, manual training has been encouraged, school funds have been honestly and fairly disbursed, and better schools have cost less per capita than under the old regime. A few towns have been able to raise funds by taxation to support public schools, but as a rule the 119,000 white children in the Indian Territory are without any chance for schooling. Mineral leases. Under seventy-one leases approved by the Department coal is being mined in the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations, and the royalties collected during the year, at the rate of 8 cents per ton, have amounted to $198,449. There are also ten other companies operating under contracts made directly with the tribes before the passage of the Curtis Act. A small amount of asphalt is also being mined there. Some coal, under temporary permission, is being mined on Cherokee lands. Town sites are being surveyed and platted in all the nations except the Seminole. Timber and stone are being taken out by contract from the Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek nations. Seminoles. The roll of the Seminoles has been made, their lands have been appraised, and more than half of the tribe has received allotments. Agreements. An agreement made with the Creeks relative to the distribution of their lands has been confirmed by that nation. A similar one made with...

Indian Industries

Second session, Wednesday night, October 16, 1901. After the singing of some Scotch songs by Mrs. Hector Hall, the conference was called to order at 8 o’clock by the Chair. Mrs. F. N. Doubleday was introduced. Indian Industries. Mrs. F. N. Doubleday, New York. Let us begin where I left off last year, when I had been speaking to this conference about basket making and other Indian industries. Before I had reached the door Commissioner Jones came forward and wanted to know what could be done to preserve them; how there could be cooperation through Washington. Miss Keel has been trying to get basketry introduced into Government schools, and in two of the larger ones it is now practiced. The following story throws some light on the slow progress made elsewhere: A graduate of Columbia had been highly recommended by his professors for industrial training, and Miss Reel would gladly engage him, but when he found the salary for teaching Indians is only $600 a year, as there are more positions for from $900 to $2,000 in Eastern cities than Columbia can supply, the Indians are not likely to secure the best industrial teachers. There has been a beautiful spirit of cooperation in this work. A letter went from the Indian Office to the field matrons, urging them, as they went about among the tepees and wakeups, to do what they could to stimulate the old industries, and to prevent the women from using Germantown wool and aniline dyes, and to keep their work up to the old artistic standards. One matron writes that in six months the women...
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