Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Charles S. Rowell

Charles S. Rowell, a farmer and the Postmaster of West Hopkinton, was born June 26, 1857, in the house which he now occupies, son of Isaac and Harriet (Adams) Rowell. This farm was owned by his great-grandfather, who settled here shortly after the Revolutionary War, probably about 1780, and was the birthplace of his grandfather, Moses Rowell, who was born November 29, 1776. Moses lived on the farm both during his father’s lifetime and after his death, when he became its owner. At one time he owned some mills; but after a while he sold them, devoting himself exclusively to the farm. On November 26, 1801, he married Tamesin Eastman, who had eight children-Abram, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Abram, Isaac, Albert G., Achsa, and Roxana. Abram died at the age of seven years, Albert at the age of five, and Achsa in infancy. Isaac Rowell, born April 19, 1813, remained on the farm with his father until he was sixteen years of age. Then he learned the carpenter’s trade, which he afterward followed until his marriage, on which occasion he returned to the farm. He made several additions to the farm, which contained in his time about three hundred acres of land. In 1840, February 20, he married Harriet R. Adams, a daughter of James and Lydia Johnson Adams, of Henniker. They had five children, namely: James A. and Harriet Ella, who died in infancy; Harriet Ella (second), who on October 24, 1866, married Frank Howlett, of Bradford; Mary E., who married June 9, 1874, George Gove, of Henniker; and Charles S., the subject of this sketch. Mr. Howlett died June...

Biography of Daniel B. Sanborn

Daniel B. Sanborn, a successful farmer of East Concord, Merrimack County, was born in Webster, N.H., April 12, 1840, son of Daniel and Sally (Batchelder) Sanborn. Mr. Sanborn’s grandfather, Tristam Sanborn, came to Webster with his wife and her parents, and took up land on what is now known as Sanborn and Clough’s Hill. He lived to be quite an old man, and remained in this place until his death. He had a large family of children, of whom Daniel, father of the subject of this sketch, was the youngest but one. Daniel Sanborn moved to Canterbury when his son Daniel B. was but an infant. He bought a farm there, but later came to East Concord, and spent his last days here, dying at the age of seventy-two years. During his early life he worked for a time as a stone cutter, but subsequently devoted himself to farming. While living in Canterbury he served as Selectman. His wife, Sally Batchelder Sanborn, was a daughter of Samuel Batchelder, of Northwood, N.H. Their family consisted of four children, including the subject of this sketch: Ann is the wife of Charles L. Brown, and resides in Concord; Frank, the youngest son, married Hattie Blanchard, and has two sons; Mary Etta is unmarried. Daniel B. Sanborn, the eldest child of his parents, received his education in the district schools of Canterbury and in the Concord High School. He came to this town in 1876, and now owns one hundred and twenty acres of tillage land. Besides his farming interests he does a fair business in lumber. He may be called a self-made...

Biography of Charles Gilman Sanders

Charles Gilman Sanders, an enterprising lumber manufacturer of Chichester, was born in this town, April 30, 1824, son of Elijah and Olive (Philbrick) Sanders. His grandfather, Robert Sanders, followed the sea from the age of seventeen until he was sixty years old. Robert was engaged in both the foreign and coast trade; and during the War of 1812 he served upon a privateering vessel, which was fitted out at Portsmouth, N.H., by Captain Chase. His last days were passed in Epsom, N.H.; and he died at the age of sixty-four years. He voted with the Whig party in politics, and in his religious views was a Congregationalist. He married a Miss Foss, who lived to be seventy-eight years old; and she reared six sons and two daughters. Elijah Sanders, born in Epsom in 1799, learned both tanning and shoemaking, and afterward followed those trades in Chichester for fifty years. He was an energetic and industrious man. His wife, Olive, was a daughter of Perkins Philbrick, a native of Rye, N.H., who moved from that town to Epsom, where he passed the rest of his life. She became the mother of two sons: Charles G., the subject of this sketch; and George S., who is no longer living. George S. Sanders married for his first wife Elizabeth Baxter, of Bridgewater, Mass. By that union there is one son, Charles H. For his second wife he wedded Hattie Atwater, a native of Maine, and left two children by this union-Calvin E. and Clara Olive. His second wife survives, and is living with her children in Worcester, Mass. Elijah Sanders lived to...

Biographical Sketch of David Sargent

David Sargent, a well-known farmer and cattle dealer of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born in this town in 1833, son of Eliphalet R. and Lydia (Wells) Sargent. His paternal grandfather, Thomas, was a native of Goffstown, N.H., in which place, also, he died. He was a farmer by occupation. Eliphalet R. Sargent was born in Goffstown, Hillsborough County, N.H. He acquired a common-school education in his native town, after which he engaged in farming during the rest of his active life. In politics he was a Republican; and he served as Selectman and as Representative to the legislature two years, besides filling other Lydia Wells Sargent, reared nine children. Mr. Sargent died at the age of eighty-two years. David Sargent, who was the next to the youngest of his parents’ four sons, was educated in the schools of Dunbarton and Derry, N.H. He then went to work on the farm, where he still remains. His enterprising spirit has led him to engage in the manufacture of lumber, and he has also dealt extensively in cattle. Some time ago he made a tour through the West, visiting Salt Lake City and many other important places, including some in California. Mr. Sargent married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Mehitable (Smith) Woodburn, of Londonderry, N.H.; and they have reared five children, namely: Fred D. Sargent, born February 5, 1858; Mary Lizzie, born February 13, 1860; John W., born September 6, 1867; Frank H., born April 12, 1873; and Nat A., born September 15, 1878. Mrs. Sargent’s father was an uncle of Horace Greeley. Mr. Sargent is a Republican in...

Biography of Walter Sargent

Walter Sargent, of Elm Farm, in the town of Warner, N.H., is well known as one of the most skilful, progressive, and successful agriculturists of Merrimack County. He was born December 25, 1837, in Warner Lower Village, a son of Abner and Martha J. (Morrill) Sargent. He is of English antecedents, tracing his lineage back to Richard Sargent, an English naval officer, whose son William, born in England in 1602, was the emigrant ancestor. He came to New England at an early period, taking with him a family of daughters, who had been left motherless by the death of his first wife, Judith Perkins, and was one of the twelve men who began a settlement at Ipswich, Mass., in 1633. He subsequently helped form settlements in Newbury, Mass., and Hampton, N.H.; and in 1640 he removed to Salisbury, Mass., becoming one of the eighteen original proprietors of that part of Essex County now included within the limits of Amesbury. His second wife, Elizabeth, bore him two sons-Thomas and William. He received several grants of land, and in 1667 was one of the Selectmen of the town. He continued his residence in Amesbury until his death in 1675. The line was continued through his son Thomas, who was born June 11, 1643, and married Rachel Barnes. Their son, Thomas, Jr., born November 15, 1676, was the father of Stephen Sargent, who was born September 14, 1710, married Judith Ordway, of West Newbury, Mass., September 26, 1730, and was made Deacon of the Second Congregational Church of Amesbury, May 10, 1757. Deacon Sargent and his wife, Judith, reared fourteen children, ten...

Biography of Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons

Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons, a well-known resident of Acworth and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in Lyme, N.H., August 9, 1836, son of Leon and Flora Ella (Prue) Sarsons. His father, who was born in France in the year 1800, emigrated to Canada in 1828, and in 1834 moved to Sheffield, Vt. He was a shoemaker by trade, and followed this handicraft in connection with farming for some time. He later plied his calling in Lyme, N.H., and other places; and in 1871 he came to Acworth, where he spent the rest of his life. He married Flora Ella Prue, who was born in Canada in 1815. They became the parents of ten children, as follows: Mary; Elinore; Eleazar L., the subject of this sketch; Flora, who was born in 1834, and died in Wheelock, Vt., in 1841; Adeline; Marguerite; William H.; George W., who died in Pennsylvania, December 6, 1880; Ella, born in Barre, Vt., in April, 1852; and Charles, who was born in Orange, Vt., in 1860, and died in 1868. Mary Sarsons became the wife of Henry Townes, of Lake Village, N.H. Her husband died July 1, 1896; and she is now residing in Nashua, N.H. Elinore married George W. Newell, of Nashua, and died May 3, 1889. Adeline married John Williams. Marguerite, who married John Clark, died June 28, 1880. William H., who married Clara Barton, died in Kansas, January 6, 1881. Ella is the widow of Ora C. Smith, late of Acworth, N.H., who died February 1, 1897. Leon Sarsons died June 17, 1888, having survived his wife, who died February...

Biography of John W. Severance

John W. Severance, a prominent resident of Chichester, Merrimack County, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born February 3, 1822, in Sandwich, Carroll County, which was also the birthplace of his parents, Asa and Rhoda (Webster) Severance. His greatgrandfather, Ephraim Severance, was one of the pioneer farmers of that town, having gone there from Deerfield, N.H. John Severance, son of Ephraim and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a lifelong resident of Sandwich. He was an able farmer and possessed considerable mechanical ingenuity, which he applied to various kinds of handicraft. He took a leading part in public affairs as a supporter of the Whig party, and served as Tax Collector for sixteen consecutive years. He married Lydia Jewell, and had twelve children. The only survivor of the family is James M., who resides in Boston. His wife, Adeline Randall, died leaving four children-Eliza, Nancy, Alonzo, and Waldo. John Severance died at the age of seventy-three, but his wife lived to be eighty years old. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Asa Severance, son of John and father of John W. Severance, was reared to agricultural pursuits; and when a young man he bought a farm adjoining the parental homestead. He displayed an ability which foreshadowed a successful future; but his prosperous career was cut short by his death, which occurred at the age of twenty-eight years. A man of excellent character, he possessed the esteem and good will of his neighbors; and his untimely demise was deeply deplored. In politics he acted with the Democratic party. In his religious views he...

Biography of Edmund Silver

Edmund Silver, a thriving farmer of Boscawen, N.H., was born in Bow, this State, September 10, 1834. His parents, Edmund and Sallie (Dow) Silver, who resided in Bow for the greater part of their lives, died when their son Edmund was quite young. They had nine children-Lewis, Laura, Cyrene, Leonard, Gideon, Sullivan, Daniel, Edmund, and George. Lewis died in March, 1897. Daniel is engaged in farming in Salisbury, N.H. George is in Penacook; and the others, except Edmund, the subject of our sketch, are deceased. Edmund Silver received his education in the district schools, remaining at home with his parents until he was seven years of age. He then went to Ware, Mass., where he was employed on a farm; and he was similarly engaged in other towns for a few years, returning subsequently to Bow. At the age of twenty he went to Canterbury, remaining there three and a half years. He then spent three years in Warner, N.H., afterward removing to Webster, in which place he was engaged in farming for about thirty-five years. Subsequently, coming to Boscawen, he purchased his present farm, then known as the Ferrin farm. It contains about sixty-five acres, most of which is under cultivation. Besides general farming he carries on a milk business. He also owns the farm at Webster where he formerly lived, which contains forty-five acres. On November 2, 1858, Mr. Silver married Lydia Ann Kimball, of Albany, N.Y., who was born March 9, 1834, a daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Hubbard) Kimball. Her father was a native of Hopkinton, and her mother of Wilmot, N.H. The former was...

Biography of Edward Payson Skinner, Jr.

Edward Payson Skinner, Jr., a well-known business man of Windsor, Vt., a dealer in fish and groceries, was born in that town, February 8, 1856, son of Edward P., Sr., and Rebecca (Moody) Skinner. His paternal grandfather, John P., was a son of Captain Benjamin and Sarah C. (Manning) Skinner. Captain Benjamin Skinner was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and while he was in the army his wife was left at home to take care of the farm and cattle. He died of spotted fever at fifty years of age; and she, long surviving him, died about fifty years ago, at the age of ninety-two years. They had a family of six children. Parry C. Skinner, a brother of John P., was Deacon of the Baptist church for nearly fifty years, and was a very active and prominent business man; Elizabeth P. Skinner, a sister, married the Rev. Baron Stow, for many years a preacher of the Baptist faith in Boston; Mary Skinner married William Beal, of Boston; Sarah C. married a man by the name of Harris; and Lora, the other sister, married the Rev. Mr. Ely, a Baptist minister who preached in Vermont and New Hampshire. John P. Skinner, who was born in Connecticut, March 10, 1788, was for thirty years proprietor of a stage line along the Connecticut River from Haverhill, N.H., to Hartford, Conn. He made his headquarters at Windsor, where he owned quite a number of farms besides village property; and while engaged in running the stages he kept from eighty to one hundred horses. In his young days, previous to the advent...

Biography of Charles Eastman Staniels

Charles Eastman Staniels, a prominent life insurance agent of Concord, N.H., was born in Lowell, Mass., December 27, 1844, son of Edward L. and Ruth Bradley (Eastman) Staniels. The father, born in Chichester, N.H., for many years was interested in the drug business, successively in Lowell and Boston, Mass. Toward the latter part of his life he removed to Roxbury, Mass., then a suburb of Boston, and died there at the age of sixty-five years. He was twice married. By his first wife there were three children, all of whom are now dead. His second marriage was made with Ruth Bradley Eastman, now over eighty-five years old, whose only child is the subject of this sketch. A daughter of General Isaac Eastman, of Concord, N.H., she is a direct descendant, in the sixth generation, of Captain Ebenezer Eastman, the first settler of Concord, and of Captain Edward Johnson, the historian of Woburn, Mass., one of the commissioners appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony to fix the northern boundary of that colony in 1652. In 1833 a large boulder was discovered at the entrance of Lake Winnepesaukee at Weirs, N.H., bearing the initials of Governor John Endicott, with those of the commissioners, Captain Edward Johnson and Captain Symon Willard, which had remained unnoticed and subject to elemental conditions for one hundred and eighty-one years. The State of New Hampshire has erected a substantial stone. canopy upon this historic “Endicott Rock,” thereby protecting the ancient inscriptions for all time. Jonathan Staniels, the grandfather of Charles Eastman, was a native of Chichester, and followed the occupations of farmer and...
Page 2 of 4612345678910...2030...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest