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Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love – 29 Nov. 1813

Soc***Grove, 29 Nov. 1813 Dear Thomas: I am told that you are very attentive and study very hard. The first, I am well pleased with, but your study ought to be so regulated as not to injure either your mind or health. I wish you would pay a little more attention to writing & spelling. If you appropriate only two hours in each day you might improve yourself much, and it might also be beneficial by relieving your mind when it is fatigued, which it is as liable to as the body after excessive labor. Learning to write a good hand will qualify you for public life by writing fair you may fill offices that may be lucrative, and such as you nor no other person can fill with dignity without that art. I have not sent you a saddle by the Boys owing to a neglect of mine when I was in Asheville last; and I think not prudent to trust to them to choose you one, for you ought to have a good one, therefore the first time I go to Asheville I will either purchase you one, if I see any that I think will suit, or otherwise, I will get Westall to make you one, and as soon afterwards as a good opportunity offers, I will send it over to you, until which time you must “live on the Bones”. I want you to send the one back which you have got with you. Give my best compliments to Genl. Taylor when you seen him. Ro. Love, –To-Thos. D. Love, Note: The above letter was...

Thomas Dillard – Will

(23 Sep 1874) In the Name of God, Amen! I, Thomas Dillard, of the County of Washington, in the State of North Carolina, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament: First, I lend to my wife during her natural life, or widowhood, the whole of my Negroes, except those given by legacy, but in case of her marriage, that the help of said Negroes descend and be divided amongst my children here named: to Ben Dillard, Wennesoppea, Mary Ann, Thomas, Stacy, Martha, Amy, John and Rebecca, and the other part with all the stock and movable at my said wife’s death to be divided equally amongst the aforesaid children. Second, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Elizabeth Anthony, Negro Inda, with her increase. I let her have at the same time and do devise, that is all I do intend for her to have of my estate. Third, I give and bequeath to my son, Benja. Dillard, Negro Piler and Joe, with the Virginia Bond Warrant for one thousand acres of land what I have already delivered to my said son with the Negroes aforesaid, and do declare that to be all that I do intend for him to have of my estate and lands. Fourth, I give to my daughter, Wennesoppea, a Negro called Cloe and one called Spence. Fifth, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Mary Ann Love, Negro Hannah, and Bob-the son of Negro Rose. Sixth, I give and bequeath to my son, Thomas, Negro Bess and Wesley. Seventh, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Stacy, Negro Lucy and Bimon....

Letter from John Bell Love to Thomas Dillard Love

Copy of a Letter from John Bell Love to Thomas Dillard Love, his brother, and now in my possession.-F.D.Love Waynesville, Nov. 18th, _____ Dear Brother: I hasten to mention the official dispatch received from our Ministers a few days ago; after entering on the negotiations with the British Ministers; it was explicitly demanded by the British Commissioners as a sine quo non as the only condition on which they were instructed to treat with America that the United States should undo a way a large portion of the State of Ohio & Territories adjacent, as well as a portion of the Eastern parts of Massachusetts, & the obligation to keep up no defenses either by land or water; on these conditions they are willing to make peace. I hope every man in the nation will unite in the struggle which is to determine whether the nations are to remain free or be enslaved. We once bought the same proud fool to yield to justice, & we are fully able for the task now. I am, With love & Respect, &c. John Bell Love, (Addressed) Capt. Thomas D. Love. Favor per Carter County, William C. Love East...

Letter from Col. Robert Love to Dillard Love

Letter from Col. Robert Love to his son, Dillard Love, who was then visiting Thomas D. Love, in East Tennessee. Waynesville, 6th, of Nov. 1815. Dear Dillard: I wish you would hurry business as much as possible. Everything here is in a bad way. I am confined down with a strained ankle. John starts tomorrow with steers to Charlestown in company with his cousin, James. William is now at a Writing School held in the Court House by a Maj(?) Porter and a Mr. Milligan, and James are in the store in the absence of Mr. Moore, who is now in South Carolina. We have this morning commenced gathering our corn. I returned from Dobson’s on Tuesday last. We have two loads of cider to draw from there this fall, which will, with other business, keep us extremely busy. The Steers for feeding ought soon to be had up. I am afraid that things will go slowly on until I can get about myself. I have not a chance to write to your grandmother, which I wish to do. I wish it was possible that you could prevail on her to spend her last days with us; I know she could be more comfortably taken care of by her daughter and myself that to remain in her present situation. She must be so infirm as to need considerable assistance. My compliments to Saml. & Thomas, with their families, not forgetting your uncle, Ben. Do tell him to write to me some time, if it should be merely nonsense, it would let me know probably his situation better then I...

Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love

Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love. Waynesville, 2nd day of November 1814 Dear Thomas: I have sent you by Dillard one hundred and fifty dollars in Bank Notes, which is all Mr. Carsons declares he could raise, having tried to borrow at several place. Those that are on this State’s Banks I flatter myself you can change in Asheville as you pass through. The balance of $150. I will pay you at our next Superior Court, which is the time his(Carsons) note is due to me; he purchased 23 head of steers, and, for which, he gave me $408. I flatter myself that you & Sammy will use every exertion in getting my wagon Ironed. I know I could and would have had such a job for either of you completed long ago, if the same means and opportunities could be under my influence. I hope you are well, as we are at this time. You had best list the Bank Notes as to date & NO. Particularizing the Bank upon which they have issued and *****as the same stating from who recd. Since writing the above I have exchanged two $10. Notes of this State’s Bank for twenty dollar note on the State Bank of South Carolina, which you find of No. 2 & dated the 2nd, of October 1813-this note I had from John Howell. I shall start for West Tennessee in 20 minutes-Farewell and God Bless you. Ro. Love Compliments to friends and particularly to...

Ann Taylor Love – Will

(4 May 1849) Last Will and Testament of Anna Taylor Love, consort of Thomas D. Love, deceased. I, Anna Love, being of sound and disposing mind, but weak of body, do make, ordain and establish this my Last Will and Testament: First, I give my soul to God, to be disposed of according to his good pleasure, and my body to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like manner. Secondly. I will that my Executor, hereinafter named, pay all my just debts, and that he raise a fund for that purpose out of the debts due me, and by a sale of any western land that I may possess as one of the heirs of Nathaniel Taylor, deceased, my Father, or any landed interest lying anywhere else, except, my interest in the farm I live on. If my landed interest will not pay my debts when sold, or if sales at a fair price cannot be effected, then and in that case my executor is hereby authorized to sell such of my Negroes, or Negro interest as will effect this object. Thirdly. I give and bequeath to my son, Robert Love, my interest in the farm I live on till my youngest child comes of age, also the benefits of a bond I hold on N.K. Taylor for between twenty and thirty acres of his home farm for the same time, to be used by him in educating and supporting my children. But on the coming of age of my youngest child, it is my will that said landed interest and the benefits of said bond are...

Letter from Thomas D. Love to John Blair

Letter from Thomas D. Love to John Blair Dear Sir: Elizabethton, Tenn, Jan. 20th, 1829. I have discerned from the newspapers Fifth Census, or enumeration of the people is about to be taken. What method will be adopted by Congress for taking, has not appeared in the papers that I take. Should a different plan be thought advisable by Congress to take the enumeration, than the old method of taking it, towit: by the marshals of the different states under the instructions of the Secretary of the United States, and the authority of doing it be place in other, men, then, in that event, I would take it as a particular favor that you would aid me by your influence to procure me and office in that business, if you should think I am capable and worthy of such an appointment; but should the old method be sanctioned by the wisdom of Congress, which it likely will be the case, than as I presume you are acquainted with the men of East Tennessee, I would be very thankful if you would give my your assistance to procure me the Office of this County of Carter for that purpose. Perhaps, you could get H. White to aid you in the business, as I should suppose his influence would be of great benefit in that case, as he must be acquainted with the Marshall of the District. There are other honorable gentlemen belonging to our representation on Congress that would, Perhaps, cheerfully assist you were you to use your influence with them in procuring the appointment of me. The reason that...

Letter from J.C.L. Gudger to Franklin Love – Descendants

Treasury Dept. Mr. F.D. LOVE, Washington, D.C. March 19th, 1903. Georgetown, Tex. My Dear Sir: Your letter in regard to Col. Robert Love reached me in due time but I have had no convenient opportunity to answer your inquiries till now. Col. Robert Love was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary Army and joined Gen. Greene in N.C. during his (Greene’s) celebrated retreat from S.C. to near Danville, Va., and the subsequent battle of Guilford Court House March 15th, (I think) 1781. Col. Love was my great-grandfather. He was not at the battle of Guilford Court House, having been sent off to S.W. Va., to the lead mines, there to procure lead for Green’s Army. He was in the battle at Whitwell’s Mills, a short while before Guilford Court House. There is an application on file for a pension by my great Grandfather, Robert Love, in the pension Office here, and if you will write the Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, D.C., he will, I have no doubt, send you a copy. It is very inconvenient for me to personally procure it for you, as the opening and closing of the Treasury, where I am employed, and Pension Office are the same. Robert Love was a son of Samuel Love and Dorcas Bell (of the family of John Bell, of Tenn., a candidate for President in 1860); date of marriage, I cannot give. Robert married Miss Dillard (soon after the close of the Revolutionary War) in East Tennessee, and came to Buncombe County, N.C. about 1790, and afterwards to Haywood County, where he resided till his death in 1845. He gave...

Letter from Col. Robert Gustavus Adolphus Love to Col. Robert Love

Letter from Col. Robert Gustavus Adolphus Love to Col. Robert Love, of Carter County, Tennessee. – (my Father-F.D. Love) Col. R. Love; – Waynesville, N.C. July 13th, 1870 Dear Sir: – I have just been shown your letter of 6th, instant, addressed to Bro. Samuel and L.M. Welch and others, in which you ask them to examine Grandfather’s diary and see if some record can not be found that Gen. T. Love only had an interest in the contract which Grandfather had for sale of the Blount land, etc, and that he, Gen. Love, had no interest in the lands themselves. As soon as I see Robert V. Welch and L.M. Welch, who are absent at Asheville on Railroad matters, I will have the diary of Grandfather examined. Those papers were never in my Father’s possession, and are therefore, not in mine. They went into the possession of uncle Wm. Welch as administrator, and when Grandfather’s will was established, uncle Welch qualified as executor with others, and was allowed to keep the papers, as no special value was attached to them. So when the boys return from Asheville, I will have them hunt up the papers and make the examination you desire. I can not see, however, how such a record can be necessary for this reason; when Grandfather and Gen. Thos. Love entered into the general agreement, of course the agreement had reference to the contract then existing between Grandfather and John Gray Blount for the sale of the land. That Agreement is on file. The date show when it was made. Grandfather was to sell for a...

Letter from John B. Love to Thomas Dillard Love

Waynesville, May 3rd, 1814. My Dear Brother: It is with a sensation of gratitude that I have the happiness of informing you that we are all in a reasonable state of health at present, thanks be to the Kind Providence for conferring on us such a Blessing. I understand from Father’s letter, which he received from you a few days ago, that you were indisposed, supposed by the consumption. This, I think, you have brought on by too much studiousness hard reading and so much sitting creates stupidity, heaviness and dullness of mind; to redress this complaint, it would be necessary to relax in your study. This, I think, would have a tendency to restore you to your health again; if not, you will inevitably impair your health to such a degree that you will never restore it to its proper station again. My dear brother, this is the 2nd, letter I have wrote to you, and have not received the first answer. I want you to communicate with me on all occasions, as I am always anxious to hear from you and your family, and all friends in that part of the country. Nothing more at present, but remain, Your loving brother until Death, John B. Love, To-Thomas D. Love, N.B. I wish you would give me a complete statement of what our taxable property was estimated to. Give my compliments to sister and Genl. Taler’s(Taylor’s) family, and brother Samuel’s family, likewise. (Addressed) Capt. Thomas D. Love, East Tennessee Carter...
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