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Treaty of July 29, 1837

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Peters (the confluence of the St. Peters and Mississippi rivers) in the Territory of Wisconsin, between the United States of America, by their commissioner, Henry Dodge, Governor of said Territory, and the Chippewa nation of Indians, by their chiefs and headmen. Article 1. The said Chippewa nation cede to the United States all that tract of country included within the following boundaries: Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers, between twenty and thirty miles above where the Mississippi is crossed by the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude, and running thence to the north point of Lake St. Croix, one of the sources of the St. Croix river; thence to and along the dividing ridge between the waters of Lake Superior and those of the Mississippi, to the sources of the Ocha-sua-sepe a tributary of the Chippewa river; thence to a point on the Chippewa river, twenty miles below the outlet of Lake De Flambeau; thence to the junction of the Wisconsin and Pelican rivers; thence on an east course twenty-five miles; thence southerly, on a course parallel with that of the Wisconsin river, to the line dividing the territories of the Chippewas and Menomonies; thence to the Plover Portage; thence along the southern boundary of the Chippewa country, to the commencement of the boundary line dividing it from that of the Sioux, half a days march below the falls on the Chippewa river; thence with said boundary line to the mouth of Wah-tap river, at its junction with the Mississippi; and thence up the Mississippi to...

Treaty of June 16, 1820

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at the Saúlt de St. Marie, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States, by their Commissioner Lewis Cass, and the Chippeway tribe of Indians. Article I.The Chippeway tribe of Indians cede to the United States the following tract of land: Beginning at the Big Rock, in the river St. Mary’s, on the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada; and, running thence, down the said river, with the middle thereof, to the Little Rapid; and, from those points, running back from the said river, so as to include sixteen square miles of land. Article II.The Chippeway tribe of Indians acknowledge to have received a quantity of goods in full satisfaction of the preceding cession. Article III. The United States will secure to the Indians a perpetual right of fishing at the falls of St. Mary’s, and also a place of encampment upon the tract hereby ceded, convenient to the fishing ground, which place shall not interfere with the defenses of any military work which may be erected, nor with any private rights. Article IV. This treaty, after the same shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be obligatory on the contracting parties. In witness whereof, the said Lewis Cass, commissioner as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors of the said Chippeway tribe of Indians, have hereunto set their hands, at the place aforesaid, this sixteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and...

Treaty of September 24, 1819

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Saginaw, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioner, Lewis Cass, and the Chippewa nation of Indians. Article I. The Chippewa nation of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby, forever, cede to the United States the land comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point in the present Indian boundary line, which runs due north from the mouth of the great Auglaize river, six miles south of the place where the base line, so called, intersects the same; thence, west, sixty miles; thence, in a direct line, to the head of Thunder Bay River; thence, down the same, following the courses thereof, to the mouth; thence, northeast, to the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada; thence, with the same, to the line established by the treaty of Detroit, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seven; thence, with the said line, to the place of beginning. Article II. From the cession aforesaid the following tracts of land shall be reserved, for the use of the Chippewa nation of Indians: One tract, of eight thousand acres, on the east side of the river Au Sable, near where the Indians now live. One tract, of two thousand acres, on the river Mesagwisk. One tract, of six thousand acres, on the north side of the river Kawkawling, at the Indian village. One tract, of five thousand seven hundred and sixty acres, upon the Flint river, to...

Elucidation of a Convention, September 11, 1807

Elucidation of a convention with the Cherokee Nation, September 11, 1807. Whereas, by the first article of a convention between the United States and the Cherokee nation, entered into at the city of Washington, on the seventh day of January, one thousand eight hundred and six, it was intended on the part of the Cherokee nation, and so understood by the Secretary of War, the commissioner on the part of the United States, to cede to the United States all the right, title and interest which the said Cherokee nation ever had to a tract of country contained between the Tennessee river and the Tennessee ridge (so called); which tract of country had since the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety four, been claimed by the Cherokees and Chickasaws: the eastern boundary whereof is limited by a line so to be run from the upper part of the Chickasaw Old Fields, as to include all the waters of Elk river, any thing expressed in said convention to the contrary notwithstanding. It is therefore now declared by James Robertson and Return J. Meigs, acting under the authority of the executive of the United States, and by a delegation of Cherokee chiefs, of whom Eunolee or Black Fox, the king or head chief of said Cherokee nation, acting on the part of, and in behalf of said nation, is one, that the eastern limits of said ceded tract shall be bounded by a line so to be run from the upper end of the Chickasaw Old Fields, a little above the upper point of an island, called Chickasaw Island, as...

Indian Treaties Aionai to Assinaboine

Treaties for: Aionai, Anadarko, Apache, Appalachicola, Arapaho, Arikara, and Assinaboine Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Aionai Treaties (I-On-I) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Anadarko Treaties (Ana-Da-Ca) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Apache Treaties Treaty of July 1, 1852 Treaty of October 17, 1865 Treaty of July 27, 1853 Treaty of October 21, 1867 Memorandum to Treaty of October 21, 1867 Appalachicola Treaty of October 11, 1832 Treaty of June 18, 1833 Arapaho (Arrapahoe, Arapahoe) Treaty of September 17, 1851 Treaty of February 15, 1861 Treaty of October 14, 1865 Treaty of October 17, 1865 Treaty of October 28, 1867 Treaty of April 29, 1868 Treaty of May 10, 1868 Treaty of September 17, 1851 Arikara (Ricara, Arickaree) Treaty of July 18, 1825 Treaty of September 17, 1851 Agreement of July 17, 1866 Assinaboine Treaty of September 17,...

Indian Treaties Bannock to Brothertown

Treaties for the Bannock, Belantse, Blackfeet, Blood, and Brothertown Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Bannock Treaty of July 3, 1868 Belantse-Etoa Treaties (Belantse-Etea, Belantse-Eta, Minnetaree) Treaty of July 30, 1825 Blackfeet (Blackfoot, Blackfoot Nation) Treaty of October 17, 1855 Treaty of October 19, 1865 Blood Treaty of October 17, 1855 Brothertown Treaty of January 15,...

Indian Treaties Dakota to Eel River

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe: Dakota, Des Chutes, Delaware, Dwamish, and Eel River Tribes Dakota (Sioux) Treaty of September 17, 1851 Treaty of October 19, 1865 Des Chutes Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Delaware Treaties (Deleware) Treaty of September 17, 1778 Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 18, 1804 Treaty of July 4, 1805 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of July 22, 1814 Treaty of September 8, 1815 Treaty of September 29, 1817 Treaty of September 17, 1818 Treaty of October 3, 1818 Treaty of August 3, 1829 Treaty of October 26, 1832 Agreement of December 14, 1843 Treaty of May 6, 1854 Treaty of May 30, 1860 Treaty of July 2, 1861 Treaty of July 4, 1866 Dwamish Treaty of January 22, 1855 Eel River Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of February 11,...

Treaty of July 4, 1866

Articles of agreement between the United States and the chiefs and councilors of the Delaware Indians, on behalf of said tribe, made at the Delaware Agency, Kansas, on the fourth day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-six. Whereas Congress has by law made it the duty of the President of the United States to provide by treaty for the removal of the Indian tribes from the State of Kansas; and whereas the Delaware Indians have expressed a wish to remove from their present reservation in said State to the Indian country, located between the States of Kansas and Texas; and whereas the United States have, by treaties negotiated with the Choctaws and Chickasaws, with the Creeks, and with the Seminoles, Indian tribes residing in said Indian country, acquired the right to locate other Indian tribes within the limits of the same; and whereas the Missouri River Railroad Company, a corporation existing in the State of Kansas by the laws thereof, and which company has built a railroad connecting with the Pacific Railroad, from near the mouth of the Kaw River to Leavenworth, in aid of which road the Delawares, by treaty in eighteen hundred and sixty-four, agreed to dispose of their lands, has expressed a desire to purchase the present Delaware Indian reservation in the said State, in a body, at a fair price: It is hereby agreed between Thomas Murphy, superintendent of Indian affairs, John G. Pratt, agent for the Delawares, and William H. Watson, special commissioner, who are duly appointed to act for the United States; and Captain John Connor, Captain Sarcoxie, and Charles Journeycake, chiefs, and...

Treaty of May 30, 1860

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Sarcoxieville, on the Delaware Reservation, this thirtieth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixty, by Thomas B. Sykes, as a commissioner on the part of the United States, and following named chiefs of the Delaware tribe of Indians, viz: John Conner, head chief of the whole tribe; Sar-cox-ie, chief of the Turtle band; Ne-con-he-con, chief of the Wolf band; Rock-a-to-wha, chief of the Turkey band, and assistants to the said head chief, chosen and appointed by the people, and James Conner, chosen by the said chief as delegate. Article 1. By the first article of the treaty made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the sixth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and certain delegates of the Delaware tribe of Indians, which treaty was ratified by the Senate of the United States on the eleventh day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, there was reserved, as a permanent home for the said tribe, that part of their country lying east and south of a line beginning at a point on the line between the Delawares and Half-breed Kansas, forty miles in a direct line west of the boundary between the Delawares and Wyandottes; thence north ten miles: thence in a easterly course to a point on the south bank of Big Island Creek, which shall also be on the bank of the Missouri river, where the usual high-water line of said creek intersects the high-water line of said river....

Treaty of May 6, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington this sixth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, as commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates of the Delaware tribe of Indians, viz: Sarcoxey; Ne-con-he-cond; Kock-ka-to-wha; Qua-cor-now-ha, or James Segondyne; Ne-sha-pa-na-cumin, or Charles Journeycake; Que-sha-to-wha, or John Ketchem; Pondoxy, or George Bullet; Kock-kock-quas, or James Ketchem; Ah-lah-a-chick, or James Conner, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Delaware tribe of Indians hereby cede, relinquish, and quit-claim to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to their country lying west of the State of Missouri, and situate in the fork of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers, which is described in the article supplementary to the treaty of October third, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, concluded, in part, on the twenty-fourth September, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, at Council Camp, on James’ Fork of White River, in the State of Missouri; and finally concluded at Council Camp, in the fork of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, on the nineteenth October, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine; and also their right, title, and interest in and to the “outlet” mentioned and described in said supplementary article, excepting that portion of said country sold to the Wyandot tribe of Indians, by instrument sanctioned by act of Congress approved July twenty-fifth, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight, and also excepting that part of said country lying east and south of a line beginning at a point on the line...
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