Biography of Henry C. Bartlett

Henry C. Bartlett, a leading farmer of Hill, N.H., was born in this town, July 25, 1845. Mr. Bartlett’s family traces its ancestry back to Colonial times. His paternal grandfather, Daniel Bartlett, was born in Plaistow, N.H., August 15, 1775, married June 3, 1801, and came from that town to Hill on horseback, with his wife, Ruth Gile Bartlett, mounted behind, in the fashion of that early day. He settled on Mason Hill, where he built a small house and took up a large tract of wild land. Full of the stirring progressive spirit of the pioneer, he was soon able to put up a larger frame house; and he had an extensive farm well cleared before his death. He lived to be seventy-nine years old, and had nine children-Susan, Ezekiel, Sally, Moses, Gertrude, Ruth, Huldah, Daniel, and John, of whom the only survivor is Daniel, who resides in Saginaw, Mich., where he has erected several fine residences. Susan and Sally were successful school teachers.

Moses Bartlett, second son of Daniel and Ruth, received his education in the public schools of Hill, and then went to Massachusetts, where he was engaged in the stone-cutting business for four years. At the end of this time he returned to his native town and bought a farm on Dickerson Hill. Later he sold that place and purchased the Colonel Ray estate, where his son, Henry C., was born. He repaired the buildings of this property and spent the remainder of his life here, passing away at the advanced age of eighty-one years. Having embraced religion early in life, he ever maintained a strictly religious integrity, dying in full triumph of his faith. His wife Charlotte, the daughter of Moses Webster, was forty-six years old when she died. Her father is said to have been a distant kinsman of the great Daniel Webster. Moses and Charlotte (Webster) Bartlett had six children, namely: Samuel W., whose residence is situated on Franklin Street, Concord, N.H., who has been a faithful employee of the Northern Railroad for over thirty years; Cyrus W., who lives in Franklin, N.H., near the Kendrick farm; LaRoy D., not living; Henry C.; Ella R., whose home is in Methuen, Mass.; and John W., of Hill Centre.

Henry C., the fourth son as the names are here given, was educated in the district schools. He began work with the late J. P. Jones in Georgetown, Mass., who for many years was one of the leading lawyers of Haverhill, Mass., but afterward returned to his home in Hill and purchased the old homestead of two hundred acres.

Mr. Bartlett married Etta Louise, the only daughter of Daniel B. and Mary (Dearborn) Bartlett, March 11, 1875. He devotes himself diligently to his farm and home, and is also faithful to his duties as a citizen. In politics he is a stanch Republican, having cast his first Presidential vote for General Grant in 1868. He has been an officer of the School Board of Hill and a Commissioner of Highways, is a member of the Congregational church, and is ever found a person of open mind and honest convictions.



MLA Source Citation:

Biographical Review Publishing Company. Biographical Review; containing life sketches of leading citizens of Merrimack and Sullivan counties, N. H. Boston. Biographical Review Publishing Company. 1897. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 27 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/new-hampshire/biography-of-henry-c-bartlett.htm - Last updated on Aug 15th, 2012


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