- Access Genealogy - http://www.accessgenealogy.com -

Surnames Maharda to Mullie

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Native American,Oklahoma | No Comments

Maharda, Or Mahardy. Or Mahasda, Sam.
Chickasaw by blood. Department flies. I. T. D., 2419-1899. 129-1901, 497-1901, 1311-1901, 7562-l902. 117-1903, 3898-1907. Indian Office flies, Land, 91609-1906. This claimant is a minor, or at most a young man. His father. Wyatt Mahardy. is a half-blood Chickasaw whose name appears on the final roll of Chickasaws by blood, approved by the Secretary of the Interior, and upon the rolls prepared by the tribal authorities in 1896 and 1898. Sam’s mother was a Seminole freedwoman, and on that account the boy was enrolled as a Seminole freedman. It is understood, however, that he holds land in the Chickasaw Nation on which are valuable improvements: that he has resided in said nation all his life; and that he would suffer serious financial injury if compelled to abandon his home and to take an allotment among the Seminoles. with whom he has never lived. After his enrollment as a freedman the department took up and reconsidered his case, but finally refused to enroll him as a Chickasaw citizen by blood. Final adverse action was taken, not upon the merits of the case but upon jurisdictional grounds, inasmuch as his name could not be identified upon the Chickasaw tribal rolls. As his father is unquestionably a citizen by blood and his mother a. free woman. Sam Is entitled to enrollment as a Chickasaw by blood. The last action in his case was taken March 4, 1907 (press copy book 328, p. 122, Ind. Ter. Div.).
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.

Manuel, Zelmore (minor).
Manuel, Caesar (minor).
Creek freedmen.
Number of claimants, 2.

Marrs, Mrs. Jane.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part II. Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. It is said this woman had resided in Indian Territory for 15 years prior to 1908; that she is a full sister of Crawford Marlow, enrolled on final rolls opposite No. 15685. and an aunt of Reuben Marlow, who is also enrolled on the final rolls of the Choctaw Nation.
Note.—Probably a “memorandum ” case.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.

Martin. Jennie
Lane, Pearley
Mike, Annie.
McCoy. Jack.

Cherokees by blood. Files: Reports Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. January 13 and 15, 1910, addressed to Hon. J. George Wright. Jennie Martin and Pearley Lane, minor children of Ada Rowe, a Cherokee freedman. Annie Mike, daughter of Robin Mike. Cherokee. No application of record. Jack McCoy, 6 years old; son of Alex McCoy, jr., Cherokee. No application of record.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 4.

Mason, Emily, post office. Muskogee, box 53A.
Creek by blood. Files: Letter of April 12, 1909, on file in Indian Office. This woman claims to be n full-blood Creek. She states in effect that her sister has received the rights incident to enrollment. Claimant seems very ignorant and appears to be bewildered as to what the proceedings which occurred in connection with her enrollment were.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Mason, Sylvester (minor).
Chickasaw freedman. Indian Office and office of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. This child is the son of Andy Mason, who is reported to be demented. The father was enrolled on the final rolls of Chickasaw freedmen. approved by the Secretary, together with two of his minor children. A third child, the said Sylvester failed to secure enrollment, not because of lack of right, but because his demented father did not succeed in having application made for him within the 90-day limit provided for in section 34 of the act of July 1, 1902.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Mayfield, Ruth Frances (minor).
Cherokee by blood. Indiin Office files: Land 24439-1909. This child was an applicant for enrollment as a “new-horn” Cherokee. Her father was a Cherokee by blood. There seems to be no question as to her right to enrollment except that no proof was submitted prior to March 4. 1907, of the marriage of her parents. This proof was necessary because it was provided by the act of April 26, 1906, that illegitimate children should follow the status of the mother. The enrollment of the child was not properly attended to because her father was an inmate of a penitentiary. The father, J. M. Mayfield, has since filed an affidavit stilting he was married under the assumed name of W. M. Mayes to Miss Nellie Crawford (the child’s mother), May 22, 1900. He has also furnished certified copy of marriage license. This case deserves investigation. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

McDaniel, Houston.
Mississippi Choctaw. Files: Part I, Exhibit F. report March 8, 1909. This claimant says he is :i full-blood Choctaw, that he removed from Louisiana to the Indian Territory about 1903; that he has not been enrolled, and that his uncle Amos Blueye has been identified and enrolled.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.
Note.—The name of Amos Blueye appears on the approved rolls

McCarty, John (one-half blood Choctaw).
McCarty, Nora (thirteen thirty-seconds blood Choctaw).
McCarty, Lillie (one-half blood Choctaw).
McCarty, Millie (one-half blood Choctaw).
McCarty, Leo (one-half blood Choctaw).
McCarty. Mary (five-sixteenths blood Choctaw).
Mississippi Choctaws. Files: Part 1. Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909. The head of this family states that he is an interpreter. He claims one-half Choctaw and that his Indian blood was obtained from his mother, a full-blood Choctaw. He says that he tried to establish his claim, but that he did not have the means with which to do anything. This family undoubtedly consists of Choctaw Indians; being mixed bloods, it was incumbent upon them to establish their right to prove their descent from an ancestor residing in Mississippi in 1830. While it appears that they are members of the Yearbey family, which went from the old Choctaw Nation in Mississippi to the extreme southern portion of the State and located near Bay St. Louis, in Hancock County, it must be that they were unable to furnish satisfactory proof of their family history.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 6. .

McGirt. Lena (minor).
McGirt, Bettie.
Creeks by blood. Files: Indian Office records, land population, 4848-1910, and decision of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes of February 27, 1907, copy therewith. Lena McGirt is alleged to be a full blood Creek. She is the child of Mangy McGirt, who is enrolled opposite No. 5547 as a full blood Creek, and Bettie McGirt. She was entitled to enrollment under the act of April 26, 1906. Bettie McGirt. according to the decision of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes of February 27, 1907, is a citizen by blood of the Creek Nation, but her name does not appear upon the rolls approved by the Secretary. Application was made in due time for the child’s enrollment, but adverse decision was rendered because the mother did not furnish proof of marriage.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 2.

McKinney, Benj. Franklin (minor).
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part II, Exhibit F. report of March 3, 1909. The parents of this child are enrolled Choctaws by blood. The father, John McKinney. who is or was official interpreter at the office of the district Indian agent at Pauls Valley, Okla., is enrolled as a full-blood Choctaw. Failure to secure enrollment due to inability to obtain affidavit of attending physician, he being absent when applications were made.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

McKinney, Gilbert
Choctaw freedman. Files: Report of November 15, 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Application was received on March 10, 1903, for the enrollment of this applicant as a Choctaw freedman. He was born September 2, 1900 and was living September 25, 1902, and is the child of Boling McKinney, whose name appears opposite No. 5536 upon the approved roll of Choctaw freedmen. The enrollment of  Boling McKinney with his other four minor children, was approved by the department March 4, 1907, but the applicant. Gilbert McKinney, whose case was embraced in that of his father and sisters, was not enrolled. The commissioner advised the department in reference to this case in his letter of June 28, 1907. hereinabove referred to.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.

McMillan, Henry (three-fourths Choctaw).
Thompson (or Henry), Leona (three-fourths Choctaw).
Hickman, Gaston (minor; about seven-eighths Choctaw).
Mississippi Choctaw or Choctaw by blood. Files: Part II, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. These people are undoubtedly Choctaws. They speak the Choctaw language and but little English. Henry states that his mother and a brother, named Sidney Amos, are probably on the approved rolls.
Note.—The name Sidney Amos does appear on the approved rolls. It is possible that the father of the Hickman boy has been enrolled. Failure to secure enrollment was probably due to negligence or inability to prosecute their case.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 3.

McMillan, W. H., et al.
Choctaws by blood. Files: Memorandum record in Part IV, Exhibit F, report March 3, 190909. (See also records of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes.) It is claimed that this person is one-half blood Choctaw, and that his father was a sheriff under the tribal government of the Choctaws. The records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes show that one Wallace McMillan was an applicant for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw, together with his two minor children: that he claimed to be a full-blood Choctaw Indian; that the field notes of the Dawes Commission showed that he appeared to be a mixed blood with the Choctaw strain predominating, and that he was therefore, with his two minor children, refused identification as full-blood Mississippi Choctaw.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 3.

Meyers. Ida.
Meyers, Lula (minor).
Meyers, Alexander (minor).
Meyers, Fred (minor).
Mikey, Joe (brother of Ida Meyers).
Chickasaws by blood. Files: Part III, report March 3, 1909. The principal applicant named above claims to be one-half blood Indian. She and her children have been enrolled as freedmen, but she refused to take land as such. She says her father was a full-blood Indian named Thomas Mikey, or Mica, or Chi-ni-ca: that she was 36 years old in 1908; that she was born and brought up in the Chickasaw Nation; that the $103 payment was drawn in her name; and that she speaks the Chickasaw language. She has the appearance of being an Indian, and if she has any Negro blood it is not discernible. The other applicants, except Joe Mikey, are her children. He is her brother. Number of claimants In this memorandum, B.

Miller, Charlotte.
Choctaw or Cherokee freedman. Files: Part III. report March 3, 1909. This woman states that her father was a Cherokee freedman; that her mother was a Choctaw freedman: that both parents had Indian blood, but that both were slaves. She also claims that she was reared In San Bois County, Choctaw Nation, and that she has never lived out of the Indian Territory. While it is apparent this woman is not entitled to enrollment as a citizen by blood, it would seem, if her statements are true, that she is entitled at least to enrollment as a Choctaw freedman. .
Number of claimants in this memorandum, I.

Miller, Mrs. G. B. (sister of).
Cherokee by blood. Indian Office files: Laud 24250-1909; Cherokee 053. This woman’s name was not reported to the department. All that was shown was that she was a sister of Mrs. G. B. Miller, and it was claimed that she was a recognized citizen by blood. It is claimed that her failure to secure enrollment was due to the fact that she was insane.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Mills, Katie.
Choctaw or Chickasaw by blood. Files: Part III, report March 3, 1909. This woman claims that her father was a full-blood Chickasaw and that her mother was a full-blood Choctaw. She was 20 years old in 1908. She has the appearance of being au Indian by blood. She was born at Wynnewood and has lived in the Choctaw-Chickasaw country all her life.
Note.—If the allegations of this woman are correct she was born after the emancipation of the Choctaw-Chickasaw slaves, and as her mother was a free woman and her father au Indian by blood it would seem that, under the constitution and laws of the Choctaw Nation, she would be entitled to enrollment.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Monroe, Willis.
Monroe, Estella (minor).
Chickasaws by blood. Files: Part 1. Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909. (Statement of Kittie Monroe, wife of Willis Monroe, made at office of district Indian agent, Atoka, Okla., November 10, 1908.) It is claimed that Willis Monroe is a half-blood Chickasaw, and that he is the son of Ka-nah-ta, a full-blood Chickasaw, by a woman named Amelia Clark, to whom he was never married. The names of Willis Monroe and Amelia Clark appear on the rolls of Chickasaw freedmen, their ages being 34 and 58 in 1902. As Willis Monroe was born subsequent to the emancipation of the Choctaw and Chickasaw slaves, it follows that if the allegations are true he is the son of a full-blood Chickasaw by a free woman, and hence entitled to enrollment as a Chickasaw by blood. It also follows that Estella Monroe, who was born in 1904, being the daughter of Willis Monroe, would be en:itled to enrollment as a new born if her father’s name had been transferred to the blood rolls. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 2.

Moore, Joseph C.. et al.
Chickasaws by blood. Indian Office flies: Land 21353-1907; department, Indian Territory Division, 7850-1907; 328, pages 2-94. Several members of this family were admitted to enrollment by the Dawes Commission in 1896; and upon appeal to the United States court the decision was affirmed. Having double Judgments in her favor, they were not required to go to the citizenship court. (See report. Mar. 4, 1907, by Attorney General Bonaparte to the President.) Under mistaken impression the case was transferred to that court and there adversely acted upon.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, approximately. 5.

Morgan, Frank P.
Choctaw by intermarriage. Number of claimants, 1.

Morgan, John.
Morgan, Cynthia
.
Cherokee freedmen. Indian Office flies: Land, 0222S-190S; Cherokee. 053. John Morgan and his wife Cynthia were the slaves of John Ross, a Cherokee chief, who died during the Civil War at Washington or Philadelphia, while absent from his tribe on official business with the United States. The Morgans were his body servants and were taken with him while he was on this mission. Their absence from the Cherokee Nation was not due in any sense to an intention to abandon the Cherokee Tribe or to take on the citizenship of another people. They returned to the Cherokee Nation shortly after the war, and probably as early as May, 1867—as soon as they could secure transportation—and have since resided continuously therein. Their names appear on the Wallace and Kern-Clifton rolls. As they were constructively residents of the Cherokee Nation all the time the requirements imposed by article 9 of the treaty of 1866 upon certain freedmen to return to the Cherokee Nation within six months really had no application to them. This case is precisely the same in principle as that of Charles Foreman, who also accompanied
Chief John Ross and who was enrolled by the Secretary. The only apparent obstacle to their enrollment is section 3 of the act of April 26, 1906 (34 Stat., 137), which, after 40 years, by legislative construction of article 9 of the treaty of 1860, limited enrollment to Cherokee freedmen “who were actual personal bona fide residents of the. Cherokee Nation August 11, 1866, or who actually returned and established such residence in the Cherokee Nation on or before February 11. 1867.”
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 2.

Mully, Chimoker.
Mully, Mitchely.
Mully, Barney.
Mully, Simon.

Creeks by blood. Files: Report of November 15. 1907. from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Case No. 1-3172. April 26, 1907, Chimoker Mully appeared before the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes and save testimony in connection with the right to enrollment as citizens by blood of the Creek Nation of herself and children. Mitchely, Barney, and Simon Mully, all full-blood Creek Indians. It developed that Chimoker Mully was identified upon the 1890 Creek pay roll. Ketchapataka Town, as Chimhoka, but that her enrollment upon said roll had previously been accepted, through error, as that of one Wattey Yahola. whose name appears upon the approved roll of Creek Indians opposite No. 2416. It was also found that her children, above named, who are also identified on said roll were listed for enrollment by the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes on May 23, 1901, as Mitchell, Barney, and Simon Wiker, and that on February 20, 1907. the commissioner dismissed the application for their enrollment, no information having been received to show whether or not they were living and entitled to enrollment on April 1, 1899. The names of these persons also appeared upon the 1890 authenticated roll of citizens by blood of the Creek Nation, on page 133. Ketchapataka Town, as Chimarhokee. Majaila, Parma, and Sarma. The evidence shows that these people have lived continuously all of their lives in the Cherokee Nation (among a band of Creek Indians who settled in the Cherokee Nation about the time of the outbreak of the Civil War), and that they have never been enrolled or recognized as citizens of any tribe of Indians other than the Creek. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 4.

Mullie, Jennie. or Chim-ho-ker.
Mullie. John, Sr.
Mullie. John, Jr.
Mullie, Katie
.
Braggs. Okla. Creeks by blood. Files: Letter of January 22, 1910, Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, to Hon. J. George Wright. The names of these claimants were on the list mentioned in the above letter from Acting Commissioner Ryan, who stated that the persons referred to therein were Indians who are probably entitled to enrollment, and who were not enrolled by reason of failure to make application. With his letter he enclosed testimony taken in the field through an interpreter relating to each case. This family is unquestionably of Creek blood. Katie, named above, is the daughter of Fannie Mullie, nee Banty. whose name appears on the final approved rolls as a seven-eighths blood Cherokee. She speaks both Cherokee and Creek. The father of Katie is John Mullie. sr., who is a Creek by blood. The other claimants are the children of Jennie Mullie, Katie is her grandchild.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 4.


Article printed from Access Genealogy: http://www.accessgenealogy.com

URL to article: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/surnames-maharda-to-mullie.htm

Copyright © 2013 Access Genealogy (http://www.accessgenealogy.com/). All rights reserved.