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Bacon, Lucy (memorandum 186).
Utica, Okla. Chickasaw by marriage. File: Part I of report of March 3, 1909. This applicant claims as an intermarried citizen of the Chickasaw Nation by her marriage August 25, 1902, with Sam J. Bacon, a white adopted citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, Chickasaw roll, by blood, No. 4869. At the time of their marriage they were both residents of the Choctaw Nation, which leaves but the one question. Can an adopted citizen confer rights by marriage with a white person? This question was before the department in two other cases at the time this applicant was denied, the two other cases being in the same family and involving the identical question. The other applicants were Belle Bacon, who claimed by marriage with William J. Bacon, a brother of said Sam J. Bacon, and Martha Black, who claimed by marriage with an uncle of the Bacons. Both Martha Black and Belle Bacon were enrolled by the department at the same time Lucy Bacon was denied. It is thought that different law clerks must have had the eases under consideration, as they are all alike. Certainly, from this statement of facts, which the records of the department will bear out, Lucy Bacon should be enrolled as a Chickasaw by Intermarriage.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.
Note.—The statements appearing in connection with the cases of Lucy Bacon (above), Joe Camp, Mary A. Crowder, Mattie Doak, Martha Thompson, Jim Johnson (or Cole) et al., Richard (or Richmond) Kimbale, James T. Leard, Annie Secor (later Owen), Rufinia Bailey, and Sallie Williams were quoted from a memorandum furnished by Messrs. Apple & Franklin, of Ardmore, Okla. These statements will be found on the accompanying sheets, which are arranged In alphabetical order, according to the names of the claimants.

Baker, Annie, et al.
Brown, Joseph H., et al.
Citizens by adoption, birth, and intermarriage. Number of claimants, 2.

Baptist, Joe C. (Age 32 in 1908.)
Baptist, Olive (minor).
Choctaws by blood. Files: Records of Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes. Part I. Exhibit F. report March 3. 1909. This man claims to be a five-eighths Choctaw and three-eighths Negro. He is on the freedman roll. He thinks he is entitled to be transferred to the blood roll. He says he has an uncle who is a full-blood Choctaw.

Joe C. Baptist also claims that he was born in the Choctaw Nation and has always lived there; also that his father was Solomon Baptist, and that he (the claimant) was raised by his uncle.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 2.

Barnett, Peggy.
Creek by blood. Files: Letter of January 16, 1909, from J. E. Tiger, assistant district agent, Holdenville, Okla. (See Part IV, Exhibit F, report March 3,1909.) Mr. Tiger states that T. Barnett, full-blood Creek, appeared at the district agent’s office to secure the enrollment of his mother, Peggy Barnett. He says that it appears her name was omitted from the rolls approved by the Secretary because of the ignorance of the heirs, who did not know just what steps to take to secure her enrollment. She died July 3, 1899, and as the law provided for enrollment of all citizens living April 1, 1899, she was evidently entitled to be enrolled. Wash Barnett, roll No. 6077, Thomas Barnett, roll No. 6078, and others, all children of Peggy Barnett, have been enrolled. Reliable witnesses can be obtained. All of the above from Mr. Tiger. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Battieste, Morris.
Mayautubbee, Mary.
Hoper, Louis.
Charles, Sarley.
Charles, Cilley.

Jacob, Johnson.
Choctaws by blood. Department flies: 151-1904 and special file 901-898. The persons named above were mentioned in tho resolution of a General Council of Choctaw Nation, approved November 5, 1903. requesting the Secretary of the Interior to take whatever steps might be necessary to secure their enrollment as Choctaws. This resolution was recommended for adverse action on grounds which were solely jurisdictional and technical without regard to the merits of the cases. It is probable some of these persons failed to secure enrollment, because their names could not be found upon the tribal rolls, or it is possible that application was not made in due time for their enrollment, but, in view of the fact that the Choctaw Council saw fit to request their enrollment, it is patent that their cases must be meritorious.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 6.

Beamer, Maggie.
Melvin, Okla. Cherokee by blood. Files: Report of November 15, 1907. from Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes. Case No. 9365. Application for the enrollment of Maggie Beamer was made June 24, 1902; she is a full-blood Indian, about 13 or 14 years of age, a daughter of Sam Beamer. whose name appears opposite No. 18962. upon the approved roll of citizens by blood of the Cherokee Nation, and one Lydia Beamer, nee Wesley, a Cherokee, who died about 12 years ago. Maggie Beamer is identified upon the 1896 Cherokee tribal roll, Tahlequah district, at No. 319, and has continuously resided in the Cherokee Nation from the time of her birth until the present time. The case of this child was not, through inadvertence, passed upon prior to the closing of the Cherokee roll.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Beams, Simon.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part III, Report March 3, 1909. This claimant says that his father was a full-blood Choctaw; that his mother was a colored woman and a slave. He claims further, however, that he was born in 1875, subsequent to the emancipation of his mother, and that he has resided in the Choctaw Nation; he also states that he has a cousin, whose name appears on the Choctaw rolls.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bean, Grover C.
Boone, Frank and Volney.
Bond, Oba
, et al.
Cherokees. May 20, 1887, this applicant and his brothers and mother were “readmitted” to Cherokee citizenship by Cherokee commission, as descendants of Ruth Bean, enrolled on “Old Settler Rolls” of 1851. He was then 3 years old. The Cherokee act of 1894 allowed 6 months for removal to the nation, but excepted minors from this requirement. He was adjudged to be entitled to enrollment by, (1) Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes October 31, 1905; (2) the Indian Office recommended that this decision be affirmed, June 14. 1906; (3) the Secretary, December 28, 1906, affirmed the decision of the Dawes Commission. These favorable decisions were based upon the theory that the act of June 28, 1898, requiring removal prior to that date, had no application to minors. Subsequently a rehearing was had, after due notice and hearing, and the department, March 4, 1907, rescinded its decision, concurring in Indian Office and Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes decisions. This boy’s name is on the Cherokee 1894 roll; also his parents’ names. He was guaranteed the right to enrollment by the tribal law and deprived of that right by the Curtis act of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat., 495). It was the intention of the Curtis Act of June 28, 1898, to preserve rights accorded by the tribal laws, customs, and usages, and not to cause forfeitures. I therefore recommend that these facts be brought to the attention of Congress to the end that remedial legislation may be enacted. The same condition exists in case of Ora M. Bond, nee Camp, who was stricken from the rolls after notice, the Boone case being also closely analagous to this. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Beddie, John Monroe.
Beddie, Anne
(minor).
Beddie, Grover Lee (minor).
Choctaws by blood. Files: Records Indian Office, the Commissioner to Five Civilized Tribes, and Part I. Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909. It is claimed that the father was a one-fourth blood Choctaw and that the failure of himself and children to secure enrollment was due to the fact that he was Imprisoned while the ease was pending.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 3.

Bell, Granville (In prison).
Tribe unknown. Probably Creek. Files: Letter March 7, 1909, written by claimant at United States penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kans. (See Part IV, Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909) This man, who was in prison at the date of his letter, is evidently ignorant. He claims, however, that he was enrolled with his mother and three brothers, upon the tribal rolls, and that they drew annuities. He also claims that he has 100 acres which he has always held as an allotment: that there are two houses on the place and about 50 acres in cultivation. Also that he has a barn and a well and about 110 acres under fence and a few other improvements. He failed to mention in his letter the tribe of which he claims to be a member. The practice of requiring all claimants to make application for their enrollment rights may have been the cause of his failure to secure enrollment.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Berry, James. Age 30 years.
Berry, Susie. Born in 1905.
Post office Eufaula, Okla. Creeks by blood. Files: Letter, January 22, 1910, from Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes to Hon. J. George Wright. The name of this claimant was on list mentioned in the above letter from Mr. Ryan, who stated that the persons referred to therein were Indians who are probably entitled to enrollment and who were not enrolled by reason of failure to make application. With his letter he enclosed testimony, taken in the field through an interpreter, relating to each case. These claimants are father and daughter. James Berry alleges that he is a full-blood Indian, claiming to be a one-half blood Chickasaw on his father’s side and one-half blood Creek on the mother’s side. No application was ever made for his enrollment He is a member of the Snake faction, which opposed the division of the tribal property. He now desires to be enrolled as a Creek. Susie is his daughter by Peggy Henry, who was his first wife, and whose name appears opposite No. 8633 on the final approved rolls as that of a full-blood Creek. James Berry states he was an infant when his father died and 15 or 16 years of age at the time of his mother’s death. He claims to have drawn the $100 payment which was made by the Chickasaws in the early nineties. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 2.

Berryman, Sallie Et Al. (Including her grandchildren and children.)
Mississippi Choctaws or Choctaws by blood. Indian Office files, land, 50263—1906. Department, Indian Territory District, 868—1907; also statement of Mrs. Berryman, made November 27. 1908, at office of District Indian agent, McAlester, Okla. This woman claims to be a seven-eighths blood Choctaw. Her children and grandchildren claim Indian blood through her only. The record in her case shows that she has resided continuously in the Choctaw Nation since about 1887. She was an applicant for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw, but as she did not claim to be a full blood it was necessary for her to furnish satisfactory proof of her descent from some Choctaw Indian who lived In 1830 and who was entitled to the benefits of Article XIV of the treaty of September 27, 1830. While there seems to have been no doubt as to her Indian blood, she was unable to furnish the technical proof required with her application for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw. and same was dismissed. It was also impossible to enroll her as a Choctaw by blood, because her name could not be identified upon the rolls prepared by the tribal authorities. Without such enrollment the Dawes Commission was, because of the act of May 31, 1900, without jurisdiction to receive or consider her application for enrollment as a citizen by blood. Number of claimants In this memorandum, 1.

Bevill, Joe T.
Choctaw by intermarriage. Files: The letter of claimant of November 25, 1908. (See Part 4, Exhibit F, report, March 3, 1909.) This claimant states that he was sent to the penitentiary, and that, feeling his disgrace so keenly, he did not return to his former home; but, Instead, to a different part of the Indian Territory; and that when he returned to his home he found the rolls closed. He claims that his citizenship has never been questioned; that the Choctaws always recognize him as a citizen; that he married a Choctaw lady, Miss Alice Pitchlynn, In 1875; and that his five children are enrolled—their numbers being 13038 to 13043, inclusive. He claims also that he was private secretary to the principal chief of the nation; that he served as county clerk, national coal weigher, and has held several minor offices besides, voting in every Choctaw election from 1875 to 1897. Upon these allegations the case deserves investigation. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Billy, Chotekey. (Minor.)
Creek by blood. Files: Part III, report March 3, 1909. This girl is about 10 or 11 years of age. Her parents are full-blood Creeks. Both are enrolled. She has always lived in the Creek Nation. She has six brothers who are enrolled. She speaks the Creek language only. The failure of this applicant to secure enrollment is explained by the statement that the matter was left to the town king and that, while the other children were enrolled, it was not discovered that this child’s name was omitted until it was too late to make application.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bird, Ida.
Choctaw freedman new born. Files: Report of November 15, 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Application for the enrollment of this applicant seems to have been filed with the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes on March 5, 1906. Ida Bird was born about June 15, 1902, was living March 4, 1906, and is the child of Sophina Hall, whose name appears opposite No. 834 upon the approved roll of Choctaw freedmen. Information from which to determine the child’s right to enrollment appears not to have been received until March 4, 1907, when the commissioner telegraphed the department and recommended that the name of said child be placed upon the approved roll of minor Choctaw freedmen. Said telegram appears to have not been received until March 5, 1907, too late for said child to be enrolled.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bird-Creek, Lewis. Weleetka, Okla.
Creek by blood. Files: Letter January 22, 1910. from Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes to Hon. J. George Wright. The name of this claimant was on list mentioned in the above letter from Mr. Ryan, who stated that the persons referred to therein were Indians who are probably entitled to enrollment and who were not enrolled by reason of failure to make application. With his letter he enclosed testimony taken in the field through an interpreter relating to each case. This boy was born March 26, 1902. His failure to secure enrollment was due to the fact that his father was under the influence of the Snake faction.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bivin, James R.
Cherokee by intermarriage. Denied enrollment March 4, 1907.
Number of claimants, 1.

Black, Thomas F., Et Al. (Including descendants.)
Choctaw or Cherokee by blood. Files: Records of Indian Office. Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, and Part I, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. This man claims that his father was one-eighth Cherokee and his mother three-fourths Choctaw, making for himself seven-sixteenths Indian blood; birth and residence in the Choctaw-Chickasaw country; obtained some schooling lit “Old Goodland” Choctaw School. Has always exercised privilege of Choctaw citizenship, voted, etc. Alleges his loss of right to partisan Indian politics. Speaks Choctaw and looks to be an Indian. Hon. Charles Carter will probably remember seeing this man at Ardmore, November 17. 1908.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, approximately, 5.

Blackman, Nannie, Et Al. (Including 4 children.)
Choctaw by blood or Choctaw freedman. Files: Part III, report March 3, 1909. This woman claims that she was 37 years of age in 1908; that she was born in the Choctaw nation, and that her father was a full-blood Choctaw. While it is true that her mother was a colored woman and probably a slave, her right to enrollment would not be affected thereby, inasmuch as she was born after the emancipation of her mother. Number of claimants in this memorandum, approximately, 5.

Blake, James Y.
Chickasaw by intermarriage. Files: Records of Indian Office, then Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, and Part I, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. It appears that Mr. Blake is a member of the class denied enrollment in 1896, who acquired the right to enrollment by marriage subsequent to that date, but who were finally denied enrollment or stricken from the rolls through error, because the rights acquired by the later marriage were overlooked. About 12 or 15 such have been restored to the rolls. In other words, he had a new source of right which accrued after 1896.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Blue, Mattie. (Minor.)
Choctaw or Chickasaw. (Freedman or citizen by blood.) Files: Part III, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. It is reported that this child was born about the year 1901: that she was abandoned by her parents, and is now living with Mrs. Mary Grayson, Ada, Okla.; that her mother has been enrolled as a freedman: and that the child has some Indian blood.

Note.—Apparently this child has not been enrolled either as a freedman or an Indian.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bond (Christian name unknown, minor child of Cornelius Bond).

Noah (Christian name unknown, minor child of Rogers Noah).
Choctaws by blood. Files: See memorandum of statement by Christopher D. Moore, made at office of district agent, at Atoka, November 10, 1908. Filed with Part I. Exhibit F, report March 3. 1909. Said memorandum is as follows: “Christopher D. Moore says that he is enrolled as a half-blood Choctaw Indian. He looks to me like a full blood. He states that he had a daughter born in the night, who lived until 3 o’clock next morning. He also stated that his wife is a full-blood Choctaw. This child was born on the last day of June, 1904. No application was ever made to the Dawes Commission for its enrollment, but an application was made to the Indian commissioner. Mr. Moore says ‘ I am a Choctaw and Chickasaw and Irishman all mixed up together.’ His wife, Ida Moore, is on the roll, at least so I am informed. Mr. Moore also states that he has a half brother named Cornelius Bond, who is enrolled as one-fourth blood Choctaw, and that he has or did have a daughter who was born about 4 years ago and who was never enrolled. The facts are substantially the same in both cases. Cornelius Bond was living near Stringtown in 1904, about 15 miles from the post office. Mr. Moore, the party making this statement, also resided near that place. He has come today 28 miles on horseback to see about this matter. Mr. Moore also states that he has a neighbor, named Rogers Moore, who had a child who was born about the same time, and has never been enrolled. Mr. Moore thinks that an application was made for this child, but that the facts were same as in the case of his own child.”

Note.—The names of Christopher D. and Ida Moore, Cornelius Bond and Rogers Noah appear on the approved rolls as being one-half, full, one-fourth, and full-blood Choctaws, respectively.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 2.

Boone, Ethel.
Benge, Young.
Buzzard, Charles
.
Cherokees by blood. Files: Report Acting Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, January 13, 1910, addressed to Hon. J. Geo. Wright. Ethel Boone, 7 years old, is the daughter of Mary Boone, a Cherokee. No application of record. Young Benge: Application for the enrollment of this person was made on April 16, 1902; but no information having been obtained showing that he was living on September 1, 1902, his application for enrollment was dismissed on February 28, 1907. Charles Buzzard, 9 years old, is the child of Cornelius B. Buzzard, a Cherokee. No application of record. Number of claimants in this memorandum, 4.

Boyd, Victoria, Et Al.
Number of persons, 5. This woman claims to be three-fourth blood Choctaw. The Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, who examined her, stated in his filed notes: “This woman has the look of being at least a half-blood Indian.” She says she removed to Choctaw Nation In 1896.

Johnson, Joseph.
Number of persons, 1. One-fourth blood Choctaw; removed to Choctaw Nation in 1896.

Bradley, Annie.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part III, Report March 3, 1909. This woman claims that she was 35 or 36 years of age In 1908; that her father, Thomas Henderson, was a full-blood Choctaw; that her mother, Louisa Irvine, was part colored and part Indian; and that the latter was a slave. She also states that she was born in the Choctaw Nation and has always lived there, except when absent attending school. While her mother was once a slave, that fact would not affect the status of the claimant, inasmuch as she was born after the emancipation of the Choctaw-Chickasaw slaves.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Bradley, Annie (minor).
Choctaw by blood. Files: Papers in office of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. (See memorandum recorded in Pt. IV, Ex. F, rept. Mar. 3, 1909.) It is alleged that this girl is one-half blood Choctaw; that her father was Thomas Henderson, who was at one time member of the Choctaw Council: and that her mother, Louisa Henderson, deceased, was a Choctaw freedman.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Brassfield, Alta May, Eufaula. Okla.
Cherokee by blood. Files: Report of November 15, 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Case No. 6415. Alta May Brassfield was born June 10, 1902, and is a daughter of John Brassfield, whose name appears opposite No. 15360 upon the approved roll of citizens by blood of the Cherokee Nation, and his wife, Mary Brassfield, a noncitizen white woman. The first application made to the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes was received September 1, 1904, too late, under the provisions of section 30 of the act of July 1, 1902, to be considered. The act of April 26, 1906 (34 Stat, 137), extended the time for the reception of applications for enrollment to December 1, 1905, but the application for the enrollment of Alta May Brassfield. which was retained in the files of the commission, was not discovered after the passage of the act of April 26 until subsequent to March 4. 1907, and her case was not passed upon prior to the closing of the tribal rolls on March 4, 1907. Said child is living at the present time.
Number of claimants in this memorandum. 1.

Brown, Josie Et At.
Choctaw by blood. Files: Part I. Exhibit F. Report March 3, 1909. This claimant wished to be transferred from the Choctaw freedman rolls to the roll of citizens by blood of the Choctaw Nation. A hearing was had before the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, and It is claimed that the evidence then produced shows that the children of Josie Brown, with the exception of one, were recognized and enrolled Choctaw Indians. It is also claimed that on December 29, 1906, the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes rendered an opinion, in which no mention was made of the hearing nor of the testimony adduced thereat, in which he held that in accordance with the opinion of the Assistant Attorney General in the case of Katie Wilson et al the petition of Josie Brown should be denied.
Note.—The decision in the Wilson case was based solely upon the fact that application was not made within the 90-day limit following September 25, 1902, prescribed by the act of July 1, 1902 (32 Stat., 641).
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 1.

Brown, Sam. (Minor.)
Creek by blood. Files: Part III, report March 3, 1909. This boy was born prior to March 4, 1906, and his parents are full-blood Creeks. They failed to make application for his enrollment. Both of them have allotments, also his brothers and sisters. This information was furnished by the father through the official interpreter at the office of the district agent at Eufaula, Okla.
Number of claimants in this ‘memorandum, 1.

Bullocks, Robert.
Creek freedmen newborn. Files: Report of November 15. 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. The mother of Robert Bullocks Is Serena Bullocks, who. with other children, Bessie Harris, Minnie Vincent, and Lou Willie Bullocks, were first enrolled as Chickasaw freedmen, opposite Nos. 1(593. 1694. 1695. and 1700. respectively, upon a schedule of Chickasaw freedmen approved by the department December 12,1902. The name of Robert Bullocks appears upon a schedule of Chickasaw freedmen approved by the department October 15. 1903, opposite No. 4318. Serena Bullocks having elected to have herself and children enrolled as Creek freedmen. Commissioner Bixby transmitted to the department on October 28, 1905, the record of proceedings had in the matter of their application for enrollment as Creek freedmen, and expressing the opinion that they were clearly entitled to enrollment as Creek freedmen. recommended that their enrollment us Chickasaw freedmen be cancelled, and stated that when such action was taken “a decision enrolling them as Creek freedmen will be rendered.” He also stated that there was, at the time of his report, no authority of law for the enrollment of the minor child, Robert Bullocks, as a citizen of the Creek’s Nation, and recommended that his enrollment at No. 4318 upon the final roll of Chickasaw freedmen be permitted to stand. Forwarding the report to the department on September 14, 1906 (Land 88437-1906), the Commissioner of Indian Affairs concurred in the recommendation of Commissioner Bixby. October 31. 1906 (I. T. D. 73898-1906). the department remanded the case to the commissioner for readjudication in accordance with the law existing at that time. January 21. 1907, the commissioner again forwarded the record to the department and concluded his report as follows:

“If the said Robert Bullocks was living March 4, 1906. then he is a person entitled to make application for enrollment under the provisions of said section (2 of act of April 26, 1906), and in my opinion his application made August 22. 1902, should be considered as a continuing application requiring action thereon as a continuing application requiring action thereon in the light of said section 2 of the act of April 26, 1906.

“I have therefore notified the mother of said Robert Bullocks, who is a minor, that if she desires the said Robert Bullocks to be enrolled as a Creek freedman. it is Imperative that she immediately furnish proof that he was living March 4, 1906. In the event that such proof is furnished, I will prepare and transmit a decision similar to the decision transmitted herewith, containing an order cancelling his enrollment as a Chickasaw freedman, and will also transmit with said decision a separate schedule containing the name of Robert Bullocks.

“In the event such proof Is not furnished, and he is not enrolled as a Creek freedman, his enrollment as a Chickasaw freedman should, of course, be allowed to stand.”

In forwarding the report to the department the Indian Office, on February 21, 1007 (Land 9086-1907). concurred in the recommendation of the commissioner, and on February 27, 1907 (I. T. D. 4732-1007), the department approved the enrollment of Serena Bullocks, Bessie Harris, Minnie Vincent, and Louis Willie Bullocks, as Creek freedmen and granted authority for the cancellation of their names from the roll of Chickasaw freedmen. Their names appear upon the final roll of Creek freedmen opposite Nos. 5694 to 5697, inclusive. From affidavits executed by Serena Bullocks, February 8. 1907, and Mary Bullocks February 9, 1907, it is shown that said Robert Bullocks was born September 10, 1901, and was living on March 4, 1906. These affidavits apparently reached the commissioner too late to report the case to the department and secure the enrollment of this child as a Creek freedman newborn and have his name stricken from the Chickasaw freedmen roll. Before this child is enrolled as a citizen of the Creek Nation, proper authority should be secured for the cancellation of his name at No. 4318. from the approved roll of Chickasaw freedmen. No application for the selection of an allotment of land in the Choctaw or Chickasaw Nation for said Robert Bullocks has been made.
Number of claimants In this memorandum, 1.

Burmingham or Bonaham, Louana
Mississippi Choctaw. Indian Office files: Land 44428-1906. Department I. T. D. 1046-1907. The record in this case shows that the applicant is a three-fourths blood Choctaw. February 13, 1907. the Secretary of the Interior rendered a decision directing the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes to identify her and her brother as Mississippi Choctaws. Her brother’s name appears upon the final approved roll of Mississippi Choc- taws, and her name can not be found thereon. It Is probable that she did not receive the notice of her identification until within a few days prior to March 4, 1907, and that the time at her disposal between the date of said decision and the closing of the enrollment work was too brief to permit of removal to the Choctaw-Chickasaw country. Thus she was deprived of the benefits which were extended to other identified Mississippi Choctaws, inasmuch as such persons were allowed six months from the date of their identification to remove to said country and one year to submit proof of residence therein.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 1.

Burney, Mary Gaines (minor).
Chickasaw by blood. Files: Part II, Exhibit F. report March 3, 1909. This child is the daughter of Albert Sidney Burney, an enrolled and recognized citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. She was born prior to March 4, 1906, and was living on that date; hence she was entitled to enrollment under the act of April 26, 1906.
Note.—The Burney family was one of the most prominent families in the Chickasaw Nation.
Number of claimants In this memorandum. 1. Bubbis, Hattie.

Burris, Isaac.
Burris, John
.
Choctaw freedmen. new horn. Files: Report of November 15. 1907, from Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. March 4, 1907. Commissioner Bixby rendered his decision granting the application for the enrollment as minor Choctaw freedmen under the act of April 26, 1906, as amended by the net of June 21, 1906 (34 Stat., 325), of Hattie, Isaac, and John Burris. On that day the commissioner telegraphed the department of his action and recommended that their names be placed upon a schedule of minor Choctaw freedmen and approved by the department. On that day he also addressed a letter to the department confirming the telegram and transmitting the record of proceedings in the case. March 9, 1907 (I. T. D. 8206-1907), the department advised the commissioner that his telegram was not delivered until March 5, 1907, and no further action could be taken In the case. Those children were born: Hattie, April 28, 1901; Isaac, December 5. 1902; and John Burris, January 29, 1904 are the legitimate children of Turner Burris, whose name appears opposite No. 4870 upon the approved roll of Choctaw freedmen, and Etta Burris, a noncitizen, and were living March 4, 1906.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 3.

Burris, Turner.
Burris, Hattie (minor).
Burris, Isaac (minor).
Burris, John (minor).
Burrs, Joe (minor).
Chickasaws by blood. Indian Office flies: Land 88739-1909. Also, report of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, November 15, 1907. Also, statement of Turner Burris. November 27, 1908, office district agent, South McAlester, Okla., Part III, Exhibit F, report March 3, 1909. Turner Burris is enrolled as a Chickasaw freedman, but he claims to be a full-blood Chickasaw Indian. He can not explain why he was enrolled as a freedman, but he thinks some mistake was made, as it seems other members of the family were Intermarried with people of Negro blood. The examination of November 27, 1908, was made almost wholly through an interpreter. Burris looks to be almost, if not quite, a full-blood Indian, who speaks the Choctaw language and claims to speak the Chickasaw language also. He says that he was born in Jacks Fork County, Choctaw Nation, and that he has resided in that nation all his life. He also claims that his father, Isaac Burris, was a full-blood Chickesaw, who received the $103 payment in 1893; that his mother, Louina Brown, was also a full-blood Chickasaw, being the daughter of one Tecumseh Brown, alleged to be a full-blood Chickasaw woman. The officers of the department, who have seen and spoken with Turner Burris, seem to have much confidence in his claim. The children, Hattie, Isaac, and John, are referred to In the report of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, November 15, 1907, wherein it appears that they were found to be entitled to enrollment as Chickasaw freedmen, but that his telegraphic report was not delivered at the office of the Secretary of the Interior until March 5, 1907, one day too late to permit of the approval of their enrollment. The mimes of these children will also be found on a separate memorandum slip, based upon the report of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, November 15, 1907, in which they are referred to as Chickasaw freedmen.
Number of claimants in this memorandum, 5.

Butler, Charley
Chickasaw freedman. Number of claimants, 1.

Butler, Andy.
Butler, Georgan.

Choctaw freedmen, new born. Files: Report of November 15, 1907, from the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. The application for the enrollment of these applicants under the provisions of the act of April 20, 1906, was received July 25, 1906, and they were listed for enrollment on Chickasaw freedmen new-born card, No. 409, the application reciting that the same was made for the”enrollment of the children as “freedmen of the Chickasaw Nation.” February 20,1907, the commissioner dismissed the application for their enrollment as Chickasaw freedmen, in accordance with the approved opinion of the Assistant Attorney General for the Interior Department, dated November 15, 1906, holding that children of Chickasaw freedmen were not entitled to enrollment under the provisions of the act of April 26, 1906. In the caption of the application for the enrollment of these children it is recited that their father is a freedman of the Choctaw Nation, but in the affidavit of the mother us to the children’s birth It is stated that their father Is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. Andy and Georgan Butler were born October 17, 1902, and August 7, 1905, respectively, and are children of Charley Butler and Carrie Butler, whose name appears opposite No. 1716 upon the approved roll of Chickasaw freedmen. Subsequent to March 4, 1900, it was discovered that said Charley Butler is a duly enrolled Choctaw freedman. his name appearing opposite No. 2426 upon the approved roll of such citizens. Evidence of marriage on file with this office shows the lawful marriage of the parents of these children on April 19, 1900. The children were living on March 4, 1906, and were lawfully entitled to enrollment as Choctaw freedmen on March 4, 1907.
Number of claimants on this memorandum, 2.

Byars, Alexander.
Mississippi Choctaw. Files: Records of Indian Office. Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, and Part I. Exhibit F, report March 3. 1909. This man claims to be one-half Choctaw and one-half white, his mother a full-blood Choctaw: that he has resided In the Choctaw-Chickasaw country since 1903; that he has relatives on full-blood rolls. He Is a Choctaw interpreter. Evidently he Is not enrolled because, being of mixed blood, he had to prove descent from an ancestor who was entitled to benefits of article 14 treaty of 1830. Number of claimants In this memorandum. 1.



MLA Source Citation:

United States Congress. Five Civilized Tribes In Oklahoma, Reports of the Department of the Interior and Evidentiary Papers in support of S. 7625, a Bill for the Relief of Certain Members of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, Sixty-second Congress, Third Session. Department of the Interior, United States. 1913. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 30 August 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/surnames-bacon-to-byars.htm - Last updated on Oct 15th, 2012


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