Sioux Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

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Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes.

Bad Arms. A Brule band. Culbertson in Smithson. Rep. 1850, 141, 1851.

Anoginajin A band of the Wakpaatonwedan division of the Mdewakanton, named from its chief.

Bakihon A band of the Upper Yanktonai Sioux.

Band that Don’t Cook. A band of Yankton Sioux under Smutty Bear (Matosahitchiay). Culbertson in Smithson. Rep. 1850, 141, 1851.

Band that Eats no Geese. A band of Yankton Sioux under Padaniapapi. Culbertson in Smithson. Rep. 1850, 141, 1851.

Band that Wishes the Life. A band of Yanktonai Sioux of which Black Catfish was the principal chief in 1856. H. R. Ex. Doc. 130, 34th Cong., 1st sess., 7, 1856.

Basdecheshni (those who do not split the buffalo). A band or division of the Sisseton Sioux.

Broken Arrows. A hunting band of Sioux found on the Platte by Sage (Scenes in Rocky Mts., 68, 1846); possibly the Cazazhita.

The Brulés of the Platte, A part of the Brule Sioux formerly connected with Whetstone agency, S. Dak. Stanley in Poole, Among the Sioux, app., 232, 1881.

Bull Dog Sioux. A Teton Dakota division on Rosebud res., S. Dak. Donaldson in Nat, Mus. Rep. 1885, 63, 1886.

Chagu (lungs). A division of the Yankton Sioux.

Chankaghaotina (dwellers in logs [i.e., log huts ?] ). A division of the Wahpeton Sioux.

Chankaokhan (sore back, referring to horses). A Hunkpapa division of the Teton Sioux.

Chankute (shoot in the woods among the deciduous trees ; a name of derision). A division of the Sisseton Sioux.

Chanona (shoot at trees). A division of the Upper Yanktonai Sioux, from which sprang the Hohe or Assiniboin.

Chansdachikana (from the name of the chief, otherwise known as Istahba, Sleepy Eyes). A division of the Sisseton Sioux. One of the Dakota bands below L. Traverse, Minn., formerly considered a part of the Kahmiatonwan.

Chekhuhaton (kettle with legs). A band of the Oglala Teton Sioux.

Cheokhba (sleepy kettle). A division of the Hunkpapa Teton Sioux.

Chokatowela (blue spot in the middle). A band of the Brulé Teton Sioux.

Chongasketon. A division of the Sisseton Sioux, identified by Riggs as the Lac Traverse band; possibly the same as the Sisseton proper of Pike; applied by early writers to the whole tribe and interpreted Wolf or Dog nation, though now recognized as a form of the word Sisseton.

Citisans. One of the five tribes of which Badin, in 1830 (Ann. de la Prop, de la Foi, iv, 536, 1843), believed the Sioux nation to be composed. Possibly intended for Sisseton.

Dhegiha (on this side. Fletcher). A term employed by J. O. Dorsey to distinguish a group of the Siouan family comprising the Omaha, Ponca, Osage, Kansa, and Quapaw tribes. Dorsey arranged the group in two subdivisions: the Quapaw or Lower Dhegiha, consisting of the Quapaw only; and the Omaha, or Upper Dhegiha, including with the Omaha, the Osage, Kansa, and Ponca.

Eat the Ham. A former Sans Arc band under a medicine-man named Wichashawakan. Culbertson in Smithson. Rep. 1850, 142, 1851.

Flandreau Indians. A part of the Santee who separated from the Mdewakanton and Wahpekute of the Santee agency, Nebr., in 1870, and settled in 1876 at Flandreau, S. Dak. Ind. Aff. Rep. 27, 1876.

Gens des Lacs (French: people of the lakes). One of the 5 tribes into which Badin (Ann. de la Prop, de la Foi, iv, 536, 1843) in 1830 divided the Sioux nation. What people he includes has not been ascertained, possibly only the Mdewakanton. Prichard (Phys. Hist. Mankind, v, 140, 1847) uses the term Gens du Lac as equivalent to People of the Leaves, and includes the 4 most easterly Dakota tribes, not only the Mdewakanton (the true Gens des Lacs), but the Wahpeton (Leaf villages), Wahpekute (Leaf-shooters), and Sisseton.

Gens de Paise (corruption of French Gens du Pats, people of the land; or of Gens du Pause, band of the paunch). Given as a band of Sioux at the Mandan sub-agency, N Dak., in 1832 (Ex. Doc. 90, 22d Cong., 1st sess., 63, 1832), but probably intended for the Hidatsa, q. v.

Glaglahecha (‘slovenly ones’). A band of the Sihasapa Teton Sioux, possibly identical with Tizaptan, q. v.

Glaglahecha. A band of the Miniconjou Teton Sioux.

Hihakanhanhanwin (women the skin of whose teeth dangles). A band of the Brule Teton Sioux.

Hinhanshunwapa (toward the owl feather). A band of the Brule Teton Sioux.

Hohe (Assiniboin). A band of the Sihasapa division of the Teton Sioux. Dorsey in 15th Rep. B. A. E., 219, 1897.

Homna (Ho-mna, ‘smelling like fish’). A division of the Brulé Teton Sioux. Dorsey in 15th Rep. B. A. E., 218, 1897.

Honetaparteenwaz. Given as a division of the Yankton of the North under chief Tattunggarweeteco in 1804, but probably intended for the Hunkpatina.

Hook. One of the small tribes or bands formerly living in South Carolina on the lower Pedee and its affluent, and possibly of Siouan stock. Lawson (Hist. Car., 45, 1860) refers to them as foes of the Santee and as living in 1701 about the mouth of Winyaw bay, S. C. Consult Mooney, Siouan Tribes of the East, Bull. B. A. E., 1895.

Hunkuwanicha (without a mother) A band of the Brule Teton Sioux.

Hunskachantozhuha (legging tobacco pouches). A band of the Hunkpapa Teton Sioux.

Ieskachincha (child of one who speaks Dakota). The ordinary name for the mixed-blood element among the western Sioux. Given by J. O. Dorsey as a Brulé gens composed of half-breeds.

Iglakatekhila (refuses to move camp). A division of the Oglala Teton Sioux.

Ihaisdaye (Iha-isdaye, ‘mouth-greasers’). A band of the Yankton Sioux. Dorsey in 15th Rep. B. A. E., 217, 1897.

Ihanktonwan (Yankton). A band of the Brule Teton Sioux, so called because descended from Yankton women.

Ihasha ( red lips ). A band of the Hunkpatina or Lower Yanktonai Sioux.

Ikmun (referring to an animal of the cat kind). A band of the Yankton Sioux.

Inyanhaoin (musselshell earring). A band of the Miniconjou Teton Sioux.

Isanyati (Santee). A Brule Sioux band, probably originally Santee.

Itazipcho (without bows). A band of the Sans Arcs Sioux, the same as Minishala, though the two were originally distinct.

Iteghu (burnt faces). A band of the Hunkpatina or Lower Yanktonai Sioux.

Iteshicha (bad face). A band of the Oglala Sioux.

Iteshichaetanhan (from bad face). A band of the Oglala Sioux.

Itokakhtina (dwellers at the south). A band of the Sisseton Sioux; an off shoot of the Basdecheehni.

Iwayusota (uses up by begging for ; uses up with the mouth). A band of the Oglala Sioux. Dorsey (after Cleveland) in 15th Rep. B. A. E., 220, 1897.

Iyakoza (wart on a horse s leg). A band of the Brule Teton Sioux.



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 18 September 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/sioux-indian-bands-gens-and-clans.htm - Last updated on Oct 4th, 2013


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