Silas Sharp, Mississippi Choctaw

Search Fold3 for your
Native American Records

Silas Sharp Et Al., Mississippi Choctaws
1896 Choctaw cases, 827

September 9, 1896. Original application to Commission to Five Civilized Tribes for citizenship in the Choctaw Nation made by Emily Jane Sharp. In her petition were included Emily Jane Sharp and Silas Sharp, Martin Sharp, Eliza Sharp, now Harrington, and her children, Ruth Harrington, Rose Harrington, Thomas Harrington, her grandchildren, and Rhoda Sharp, now Vineyard, Richard Sharp, Ella Sharp, now Hendricks, Edward Sharp, her children.

Answer of the Choctaw Nation, filed October 22, 1896

December 4, 1896. Decision of commission rendered denying application, from which no appeal was taken to United States court in Indian Territory, as provided by act of June 10, 1896. In her application Emily Jane Sharp alleged that she was 58 years of age; that she was borne in Mississippi and her parent’s name was Silas Moore, and that her great grandmother, Silas Moore’s mother, was a full-blood Choctaw Indian; that she was married to Jack Sharp in Calhoughn County, Miss., in the year 1865, and came to the Territory after their marriage and had since lived there.

Affidavits were filed in support of their case as follows:

Andrew Jackson Avant testified that he was 74 years of age: post office was Troga, Tex.; occupation, farming, that he was well acquainted with applicant and knew her to be a daughter of Ebenezer Moore: that Ebenezer Moore was a Choctaw Indian; and the son of old Silas Moore, who was known by all as a Choctaw; that applicant was married to Jack Sharp about the year 1865.

Lottie Filmore testified, through Mary Jane Melton, interpreter: She was an old woman near 80 or 85 years of age: was a full-blood Chickasaw Indian who came from Mississippi to Indian Territory with her tribe. She knew Silas Moore in Mississippi; he was a Choctaw Indian by blood; she knew Emily Ann (Moore) Quaid, and lived about 4 miles from her; said Emily Ann Quaid was a daughter of Silas Moore, and she knew both of these persons in Mississippi; from her knowledge of the family and the general appearance of Emily Ann Quaid she believes her to be Choctaw by blood.

Sam Perry is 84 years old; post office, Wiley, Ind. T. He knew Silas Moore in Mississippi before he came to Indian Territory in 1832 to 1833. Silas Moore was a Choctaw Indian by blood, and always so considered; Emily Moore, now Quaid, was daughter of Silas Moore, and a Choctaw by blood.

Joint affidavit of Martha Scott and W. Pettington to the effect that Emily Ann Quaid and Benson Wright Moore are children of Silas Moore, and that Jane Sharp is a granddaughter of Silas Moore.


Benson W. Moore
1896 Choctaw case, 351.

September 9, 1890. Original application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes for citizenship in the Choctaw Nation by blood under the act of June 10, 1896, of Benson W. Moore; Octavia Moore (now Hurst) his children; and Lizzie Hurst, Breed Hurst, his grandchildren; and Adile Moore (now Boots); Silas Water Moore, and Thomas Lee Moore.

Answer by Choctaw Nation filed October 22, 1896.

December 2, 1896. Commission rendered decision denying application. From this decision no appeal was taken as provided by act of June 10, 1896.

In his petition Benson W. Moore stated that he was 62 years old: occupation, a farmer: post office, Mannsville, Ind. T.; he was born in Hines County. Miss.: his father’s name was Silas Moore, who was a Choctaw Indian and lived in Mississippi until 1864, when he moved to Texas and lived until his death, which occurred in 1872; Silas Moore’s mother, his grandmother, was a full-blood Choctaw Indian, who died in Lafayette County, Miss., about the year 1843; he was married in 1860 to Susan Brewer, and by her had eight children, six of whom were living and included in his petition.

Affidavits of Sam Perry and Lottie Filmore and joint affidavit of Martha Scott and W. Pennington, like those introduced in the previous case, were filed.


Emily Ann Quaid
1896 Choctaw. No. 67.

September 9, 1896. Original application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes under act of Congress of June 10, 1896, for citizenship by blood in the Choctaw Nation by Emily Ann Quaid, Benjamin Quaid, Hugh Quaid. America Quaid (now Bennett), Young H. Quaid, Jenumiah Quaid (now Ennan), Thomas Quaid.

Answer of Choctaw Nation filed October 22, 1896.

December 1, 1896. Commission rendered decision-denying application. No appeal was taken from this decision as provided by act of June 10, 1896.

In her petition Emily Ann Quaid alleged that, she was 77 years of age and lived at Wiley, Ind. T.; that her father, Silas Moore, was a Choctaw Indian and left Mississippi in 1846 and went to Texas; that Silas Moore’s mother, applicant’s grandmother, was a full-blood Choctaw Indian; that applicant was born in Alabama and was married in Hines County, Miss., to Thomas Quaid on September 11, 1837; that she had never made application to the Choctaw council as she was poor and had not the required amount of money.


In support of this application the following affidavits were introduced:

Affidavit of Lottie Filmore, identical with that introduced in the previous case. Joint affidavit of Martha Scott and W. Pennington, as introduced in previous cases.

Affidavit of B. W. Quaid, who stated that his mother’s name was Emily Ann Moore, and that her father’s name was Silas Moore, and that he had often heard his grandfather say he was a Choctaw Indian; that he was a very old man, between 88 and 90 years of age, when he died.

Affidavit of Sam Perry, as introduced in previous cases.

Affidavit of Y. H. Quaid, who stated that his mother’s maiden name was Emily Moore: her father’s name was Silas Moore; he remembered his grandfather well, and had always been told he was a Choctaw Indian, and that his grandfather’s mother was said to be a full-blood Choctaw Indian.


1899. Application made at Caddo, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen by blood of the Choctaw Nation by Silas Sharp.

September 14, 1901. Application made to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaw of Silas Sharp and Orby Sharp, Willie Florence Sharp, Claud Sharp, Edgar Sharp, Fred Sharp, Nola Sharp; lived in Indian Territory about 15 years, in Texas 8 years, Arkansas 20 years; born in Mississippi and lived there till he was 4 years old and moved to Arkansas: never held any land in Indian Territory.

September 12, 1901. Application made to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Elihu Quaid; lived in Indian Territory five years; never held any land.


1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes at Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a citizen of the Choctaw Nation by William A. Quaid; liven in Indian Territory five years; born and raised in Texas, and lived there until he came to Indian Territory.

1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Caddo, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen by blood of the Choctaw Nation of Benson W. Moore.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Benson W. Moore, Lizzie Hurst, Bruce Hurst, his grandchildren; lived in Indian Territory seven years; lived on land for five years and paid no rent; lived in Texas 40 years before he came to Indian Territory; was born in Mississippi, and lived there till he moved to Texas.

September 21. 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes. Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaw of Thomas L. Moore: lived in Indian Territory seven years; born and raised in Texas; lived there till he came to Indian Territory; rents land.


1899. Application to Commission to Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen by blood of the Choctaw Nation of Rosa A. Moore.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Rosa Moore and Clarence Moore, her child; lived in Indian Territory seven years; born and raised in Texas; lived there till she moved to Indian Territory; don’t hold any land.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Oscar Moore and John A. Moore, his child: lived in Indian Territory seven years; prior to that lived in Texas, where he was born and raised; rents land.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaw of Willis Moore; lived in Indian Territory seven years; prior to that lived in Texas, where he was born and raised: holds no land.


1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes at Atoka, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen by blood of Choctaw Nation of Emily Quade.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Emily Quade; lived in Indian Territory about 11 years; in Texas about 40 years: in Mississippi about 20: was born in Alabama and went to Mississippi when 2 years old; does not hold any land.


1899. Application to commission at Atoka, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen by blood of Choctaw Nation of Emily J. Innan.

September 21, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Emily G. Innan and America Elizabeth Chapman, Thomas Harrington Chapman; Napoleon Bonepart Chapman, and Emily Jane Reed, her children; lived in Indian Territory 10 years; born and raised in Texas; lived there; she went to Indian Territory: rents land.

September 12, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of America J. Bennett, Luther H. Long, Columbus J. Long, Robert B. Long, and Ester Loramie Bennett; lived in Indian Territory eight years; born and raised in Texas; lived there till she moved to Indian Territory, holding land and not paying rent for two years.

September 12, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Emma Elizabeth Smith; lived in Indian Territory eight years; prior to that in Texas, where she was born and raised: holds no land.

September 12, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Maggie Bell Strather: lived in Indian Territory six or seven years: prior to that lived in Texas, where she was born and raised; holds no land.

September 4. 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Benjamin W. Quaid: lived in Texas since 1849; born in Mississippi and lived there till he was 9 years old, when he went to Texas.

1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Susan L. Wells.

September 4, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Susan L. Wells, Martha Elizabeth Wells, John Richinson Wells, Robert Benjamin Wells, Carrie Ellen Wells, James Herman Wells, Ethel Irene Wells, and Mamie Lodeska Wells: lived in Indian Territory seven years; born and raised in Texas and lived there prior to removal to Indian Territory: rents land.

September 4, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Lee Harrington Quaid; lived in Indian Territory 11 years; born in Texas and lived there till he removed to Indian Territory; holds no land.


1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Caddo, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Thomas Quaid.

September 5, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Thomas Quaid, Thomas D. Quaid, Uler May Quaid, Simpson W. Quaid, John Wesley Quaid, Josie L. Quaid, and Essie M. Quaid; lived there till he moved to Indian Territory: held land for two years.

September 5, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Minnie Nugent and Thenie May Nugent; lived in Indian Territory six years; born in Texas; lived there till she came to Indian Territory; holds no land.

September 4, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Young Harrington Quaid, John L. Quaid, William Quaid, Lillie M. Quaid, Charles K. Quaid, and Rebecca Emily Quaid; lived in Indian Territory six years; born and raised in Texas and lived there till he came to Indian Territory: holding land about a year.

September 7, 1901. Application to the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Simmerrude Ellen Tice and Julia May Tice; lived in Texas at time of application: had lived in Indian Territory four or five months the preceding winter.

September 10, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Kenny Moore: lived in Indian Territory two weeks; in Texas two years; in Indian Territory about a year: and prior to that in Texas, where he was born and raised.


1899. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Durant, Ind. T., for enrollment as a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of John T. Quaid.

September 25. 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of John T. Quaid, Fred R. Quaid, Frank B. Quaid, William J. Quaid, and Vernon R. Quaid; lived in Indian Territory three years; prior to that lived in Texas, where he was born and raised.

September 25, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Simpson M. Moore, Felix F. Moore, Lillie Moore, Andrew H. Moore, Mollie Moore, Lemuel Moore, and Minion Moore; lived in Texas, where he was born, all his life.

September 27, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Walter D. Moore: lived in Texas all his life.

September 25. 1901. Application to Commission of the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Mollie Pirtle, Roscoe Pirtle. Monnie Pirtle. Consouela Pirtle and Rosella Pirtle: lived in Texas, where she was born and raised.

October 8, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Atoka, Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Felix F. Moore, Walter L. Moore, Nona V. Moore, Mary E. Moore, Leta B. Moore, and Janice M. Moore; lived in Indian Territory about nine months: before that in Texas, where he was born and raised.

November 6, 1901. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Muskogee, Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of John R. Moore; lived in Indian Territory about a month: prior to that in Texas, where he was born and raised.

March 4. 1902. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Muskogee. Ind. T., for identification as Mississippi Choctaws of Earnest W. Long and Earnest Lee Long; lived in Indian Territory about eight or nine years; prior to that in Texas, where they were born and raised.

January 24. 1902. Application to Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, Muskogee. Ind. T., for identification as a Mississippi Choctaw of Booty Moore; lived in Indian Territory about a month; prior to that in Texas, where he was born and raised.

September 3. 1902. Commission rendered a decision holding evidence was insufficient to identify applicants herein as Mississippi Choctaws. The 1890 application was shown in the decision. On the same date the record was forwarded to department. No evidence had been introduced except the testimony of the various applicants and evidence of the marriage of certain of the parties to this case.

December 5. 1902. The Indian Office recommends the approval of the commission decision.


December 15, 1902. The department addressed a letter to the Indian Office requesting further report on this case, in which the following appears:

The testimony in this case shows that the parties base their claims to identification as Mississippi Choctaws under this application because of their descent from Silas Moore and Morning Dumas, his wife, and their children. Ebenezer Moore, Emily Quaid, Seaton Moore, Benson W. Moore, and Simpson Moore, of whom Ebenezer and Emily were born prior to 1830. They claim that these parties were Choctaw Indians and residents of the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi at the time of the making of the treaty of 1830.

An examination had been made of the records of the office with reference to the names of the different parties from whom these applicants claim descent, and it is discovered that neither their names nor any names similar to them appear among the names of those who complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of the fourteenth article of the Choctaw treaty of 1830.

In connection with the last paragraph above quoted your attention is directed to your report of July 16, 1902 (Land 31530, 1902), wherein you state: ” I now have the honor to report that the records of this office show that John Moore claimed land under the fourteenth article of the Choctaw treaty of 1830, for himself and his children, in all aggregating 3½ sections: this claim was approved by the President of the United States and the following patented so far as the records of the land Office show * * * in the State of Mississippi.”

The record in the present case shows that the Silas Moore to whom yon refer in your report of December 5, 1902, was the son of one John Moore by his wife, Nancy: that the latter was a full-blood Choctaw and that her father’s name was Jacob Folsom. You are therefore requested to make a supplemental report showing whether the information relative to compliance with the provisions of the fourteenth article of the treaty of 1830 or with the subsequent acts relating thereto on the part of said John Moore and Jacob Folsom.


January 8. 1903. The Indian Office reported to the department, which report was in part as follows:

The recommendation of this office in this case was based on the fact that Silas Moore was the head of a family in 1830, and under the holding of the department already made in the case of Susan S. Burton et al., applicants for identification as Mississippi Choctaws, claimants under Susannah Graham, they were not entitled to because their ancestor, the daughter of Susannah Graham, was not herself an applicant, although she was at that time the head of a family.

There were two persons by the name of John Moore, one of whose status had been reported on as given herein. He submitted proof as to his continued residence on the land described for the period of five years succeeding the date of the Choctaw treaty of 1830.

This office never had any information, outside of the amount of land set aside for Moore, as to the number of children there were in his family.

The other John Moore was emigrated by the Government of the United States to the Choctaw Nation west, and he arrived in the Choctaw Nation west on the 23d day of December 1832. He was a member of the company of Kohoowak, and his family consisted of two male children under 10 years of age, one male person of 35 and under 50 one female of 10 and under 25, and one female of 25 years and under 50, making in all a family of five persons.

There was a Nancy Moore, an applicant as the head of a family under the fourteenth article of the Choctaw treaty. She was not the wife, but the daughter of John Moore, and her husband was Capt. John Perry. At the time of the application she had a son named Commodore, over 10 years of age. Her application was rejected on the ground that she was not the head of a family, and voluntarily abandoned her residence about three years after the treaty.

There was a Jacob Folsom, a member of the Choctaw tribe in Mississippi in 1830. He was the head of a family, but did not apply for land under any of the articles of the Choctaw treaty. He was emigrated west by the Government with his family, consisting of one male under 10 years of age, one male under 25 years of age, one female over 10 years and under 25 years of age, and three slaves. He arrived in the Choctaw Nation west on the 20th day of January. 1832.

If it is now the Judgment of the department under the opinion of the Assistant Attorney General for the Interior Department of October 30, 1902 (I. T. D. 4631 and 5847. 1902), that the descendants of the head of a family living in 1830, who did not comply, but whose parents did comply, are entitled to participate in the distribution of Choctaw lands under present legislation, it would be necessary that further proof be called for from the applicants In the case under consideration herein, that the John Moore, through whom they claim descent, was the John Moore who did comply with the provisions of the fourteenth article of the Choctaw treaty of 1830.


February 14,1003. Department requested supplemental report from Indian Office with reference to John and Nancy Moore, John Moore, having received land under the fourteenth article of the treaty, and Nancy Moore having applied as the head of a family and been rejected.

May 1. 1903. The Indian Office reported in part as follows:

The records of this office show that the reservation of John Moore was approved by President Andrew Jackson, June 3, 1830. This reservation was set aside for him by George W. Martin, locating agent, and his report containing this location was dated October 21, 1830. The land set aside for John Moore was sections 11. 13. 14 and the north half of section 23, all in township 20 north range 11 east, Webster County, Miss. He had seven children, four under 10 years of age, and three over 10. This land was never patented to him, and still stands on the books of the land office as his reservation. This office can not give the reason why the land was never patented at this time, but the record given as follows will have a tendency to explain the reason. (Brown and Kincannon’s notes of proceedings in certifying Choctaw claims in Mississippi, No. 95. p. 276.)

The affidavit of F. Oakley, filed in this case proving the continued residence of the reservee for five years from the ratification of the treaty. The reservee in this case has sold his land in parcels to different persons, who all want patents to their own names, but understanding that it is a rule in the department to issue one patent for one reservation, the commission recommends the issuance of the patent in the name of the reservee. Applied by Kincannon, November 1840.

There was another John Moore, a member of the Choctaw tribe east of the Mississippi in 1830, having a family of five persons, who were transported to the Choctaw Nation west by the Government in the general Choctaw emigration, rations having been issued to them first on the 23d day of December 1832.

It is also discovered that there was a John Moore, who purchased the NE. ¼ of the NE. ¼ and the SW. ¼ of the NE. ¼ of sec. 21, T. 5 N., R. 14 E. of the land district of Augusta, Miss., surrendering therefor, as assignee, a part of Choctaw script. No. 178 B. This piece of script was issued in behalf of Antumber, Istonoka, and Hokaloche, children of Atanahato, over 10 years of age, and was for 320 acres, as will be seen by reference to the map of Mississippi. The land taken under this script is located in Clarke County, quite remote from the home of the John Moore who received land under the Choctaw treaty. The testimony in this office relative to Nancy Moore is as follows:

“Nancy Moore, a half blood, gone west last fall a year; A. Halsey, counsel; Joseph Perry, a half-blood Choctaw, a witness for claimant, was sworn, and deposed as follows: That he had known Nancy Moore from the time she was a little child: she is now 24 or 25 years old; the daughter of Zone John Moore, now living on the old Natchez tract. She was married at the time of the treaty to Capt. James Perry, and when his brother John married her according to the Choctaw fashion his old wife and her could not agree. His brother James built a cabin for her and opened a field, where she went to live, still continuing to be the wife of his brother John. This cabin was about 7 miles from his brother John, who used to go and see her and stay with her. At the time of the treaty James Perry gave her some stock, and she had a man by the name of Emisha to take care of it. She lived about, sometimes at home and some times at his brother John’s; she had one child living with her at the time of the treaty called Commodore, born October 25, 1830. He takes this from a memorandum in his possession, made at the time he was born. Commodore and his mother both went west last fall a year. She moved with his brother James about three years after the treaty to Yokenny-effa, where she lived until she went west. Nancy Moore belonged at the time of the treaty to Anthony Turmball’s company.”


May 22. 1903. The department refers to report of Indian Office quoted above and remands the case to the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes as follows:

It is considered possible that the ancestors of these applicants may have been the identical persons referred to in the reports of the Indian Office who were apparently entitled to the benefits of article 14 of the treaty of 1830. Therefore a final adjudication of the case should not be had at the present time and the same is remanded to you for appropriate action in accordance with the instructions, so far as they are applicably contained In departmental letter of April 2, 1903, relative to the Mississippi Choctaw case of Harriet Adkins (M. C. R. 4964).


August 7, 1903. Further hearing had in this case before commission. Muskogee, Ind. T., at which time the testimony of Thomas S. Ashley was taken.

Mr. Ashley testified that he was born near Mobile, Ala., August 24, 1820; that he moved to Carrol County, Miss., when they were putting the boundaries across the river. When asked what year, he responded 1830. He lived in Mississippi until he removed to Texas in 1873, where he resided until the spring prior to his appearance. He was acquainted with the applicant, Silas Sharpe, and did not know where he was born; that Sharpe had Choctaw blood, but did not know how much. He knew that Emily Jane Moore, who married Silas Sharpe, possessed Choctaw blood, but did not know how much, thought she was a quarter blood.

(Emily Jane Moore was mother, not wife, of Silas Sharpe. According to the testimony of Silas Sharpe, husband of Emily Jane Moore was Jack Sharpe. Think this must have been a mistake in asking the question, as a little farther on he spoke of Jack Sharpe, husband of Emily Jane Moore, and stated he did not know when they married.)

Asked if he was acquainted with the father and mother of Emily Jane Moore, he said, Yes, sir; I do not know for certain, but John Moore married Nancy.” He said Emily Jane Sharpe’s mother’s name, to his recollection, was Emily. Silas Moore was her father. He knew Silas and Nancy Moore in Mississippi. Nancy was a full-blood Choctaw. John Moore was a white man married to Nancy Folsom. He was personally acquainted with both of them in Carrol County, near Carrolton, Miss. He lived on Duck Hill Road, about 5 miles from where they lived. He first became acquainted with them in 1830 and they were married then and had children; could not recollect how many, but had three, named Silas, Martin, and Jesse, whom he remembered. Martin was older than Silas and might have been 9 or may be older than that. He did not know about their ages. Did not know Nancy’s parents’ given names; they were Folsoms and Joe Folsom was related to her.

Nancy Moore owned improvements in Mississippi in 1831; had a house and 30 or 50 acres ot land; might have had more. Heard they lost it somehow. The house was a pole house, built of poles and bark. After they lost this place they went down on the Natchez road and camped at Lapecle; they lived there four or five years. The last time he saw John and Nancy Moore, as well as he can recollect, was 1844 or 1846.

At the time he knew Nancy and John Moore he knew Greenwood Laflore. Jack Laflore, Charley Laflore, and Bill Laflore; Charley Laflore and Jack Lanore were Greenwood Laflore’s sons. Jack Laflore was a grown man at this time (about 1830, he testified).

He was asked if Silas Moore, one of the three children of John and Nancy Moore, whom he remembered, was married at that time and answered that he was not.

In response to examination by B. Johnson, applicant’s attorney, he stated he had heard about the Dancing Rabbit Creek treaty and had heard that John and Nancy Moore went to Ward to have their names put down. They said he had lost his land, that Ward turned it over to the Government, and he would have to hunt another home.

He testified that he heard this from Moore himself and understood that Ward was up on Big Sandy, near Carrolton, when Moore went to register; that Moore told witness’s father and wanted help about getting Ward in good humor so he could get his place back.

He had a younger brother, John Ashley, living near Pearl, Rankin County, Miss.


October 1, 1903. Case was returned to department.

July 115. 1904. Department approves action of Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes. In Indian Office letter of July 6, 1904, the Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs again refers to records as to John Moore and Nancy Moore as reported former Indian Office letters, and states:

The records of this office show that Capt. John Perry, the husband of Nancy Moore, did go west with his family, and received rations April 21, 1833. Claimants base their claim to recognition as Mississippi Choctaws on being descendants from one Silas Moore, a son of John and Nancy Moore, nee Folsom, their great grandfather, and Ebenezer Moore, their grandfather on their mother’s side, Emily Jane Sharpe. It nowhere appears of record in this office that the Nancy Moore, whose husband was Capt. John Perry, and who had a son named Commodore, ever had a husband named John Moore, or a son named Silas Moore, or descendants named Ebenezer Moore or Emily Jane Sharpe, through whom applicants trace descent. The evidence and the records fail to show that the Nancy Moore from whom applicants claim descent is identical with the Nancy Moore who received scrip under subsequent legislation relative to the treaty of 1830, or that a less remote ancestor or any of the applicants herein ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of the treaty of 1830 or received land or scrip under subsequent legislation relative thereto.

June 25. 1906. Motion for rehearing filed with the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes.

July 17, 1906. Motion forwarded department.

November 8. 1906. Motion for rehearing denied by department.

June 28, 1907. Motion for rehearing was filed with department, accompanied by certificate. Copy of patent issued to John Moore for certain lands in Mississippi.

February 2. 1907. Motion for rehearing denied by department.

March 25, 1909. Department requests report upon petition of J. O. Poole in this case.

April 7, 1909. Report to department.

May 28, 1909. Department holds case is not analogous to Goldsby case and declines to take action looking to enrollment of applicants.

It appears from the testimony and from the family tree, which is part of the record that Nancy Moore a full blood and John Moore were the parents of Silas Moore, deceased, who married Morning Demas or Morning Fulson or Hona Moore (seems to have been known by all these names), deceased; that Silas Moore and his wife had children as follows: Ebenezer Moore, Emily Moore, Seaton Moore, Benson W. Moore, and Simpson Moore.

Ebenezer, Seaton, and Simpson Moore were deceased at the time of the application.

Ebenezer Moore married Mahali Moore and had one child, Emily Jane Moore, who married Jack Sharpe.

Emily Jane Sharpe had two children. Silas Sharpe, who has six children, Orby, Willie, Florence, Clause, Edgar, Fred, and Nola Sharpe; and Richard Sharpe, who had no children.

Emily Moore married Thomas J. Quaid, deceased; Emily Quaid was 83 years old and the oldest claimant in this case. She had children as follows: (1) Benjamin W. Quaid, (2) Elihu Quaid, (3) America J. Quaid, (4) Young Harrington Quaid, (o) Emily G. Quaid, (G) Thomas Quaid.

(1) Benjamin Quaid had three children: John T. Quaid, who had four children. Fred U., Frank B., William J., and Vernon R. Quaid, Susan Lodeska Quaid, who married J. M. Well and had seven children, Martha Elizabeth, John Richinson, Robert Benjamin, Carrie Ellen, James Herman, Ethel Irene, and Mamie Lodeska Wells. Simerruda E. Quaid married R. E. Tice and had one child, Julia May Tice.

(2) Elihu Quaid had one child. William Amburse Quaid, who had no children.

(3) America J. Quaid married John Long and afterwards John H. Bennett, and had six children: Emma Elizabeth Long, married Newton Carrol Smith, no children; Earnest W. Long, who had one child; Earnest L. Long; Luther H. Long: Columbus J. Long; Robert B. Long; Ester Loraine Bennett.

(4) Young Harrington Quaid, who had six children: Maggie Bell Quaid, who married William Strother (no children), and John L., William. Lillie M., Charles R., and Rebecca Emily Quaid.

(5) Emily G. Quaid, who married James Richard Chapman, John A. Reed, and Elaxander R. Innan, all dead, and had four children: America Elizabeth Chapman, Thomas Harrington Chapman, Napoleon Bonepart Chapman, and Emily Jane Reed.

(6) Thomas Quaid, who had seven children: Thomas D. Quaid; Minnie Quaid, who married Willie Nugent and had one child, Thenie May Nugent; Uler May Quaid; Simpson W.; John Wesley; Josie L.; and Essie M. Quaid.

Seaton Moore had six children:

(1) Simpson M. Moore, six children: Felix F., Lillie, Andrew, Mollie, Lennil, and Minnon Moore.

(2) Felix F. Moore, five children: Walter L., Nona V., Mary E., Let a B. and Janice M. Moore.

(3) John R. Moore,

(4) Reny Moore,

(5) Water D. Moore,

(6) Booty Moore.

Benson W. Moore, who had five children:

(1) Octavia Moore, deceased, who married Lee Hearst and had two children, Lizzie and Bruce Hearst:

(2) Thomas L. Moore,

(3) Oscar Moore, one child. Johnny Moore;

(4) Willie Moore,

(5) Rosa Moore, who married W. R. Moore, and has one child, Clarence Moore.

Simpson Moore, who had one child, Mollie E. Moore, who married George W. Pirtle and had four children: Roscoe, Monnie, Consouela and Rosella Pirtle.

Statement By Counsel

As these applicants had resided in the Choctaw Nation for many years prior to the malting of the final rolls and are conclusively descendants of a fourteenth-article Mississippi Choctaw, as shown by the testimony hereto attached, they should now be enrolled.

Respectfully submitted.
Ballinger & Lee


Department Of The Interior,
Muskogee, Okla. December 9, 1910.

In the matter of the application for the enrollment of Emily Jane Sharpe et at. as citizens by blood of the Choctaw Nation.

Proceedings had at Durant, Okla., November 14, 1910, before W. C. Pollock, assistant attorney, Interior Department.

Appearances: Ballinger & Lee, by Albert J. Lee, attorneys for claimants; Rodgers & Clapp, by George D. Rodgers, attorneys for Chickasaw Nation.

Emily Jane Sharpe, being duly sworn and examined as a witness, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lee:
Q. State your full name, please. -
A. My given name?

Q. Your married name now? -
A. Sharpe. I was a Sharpe after I married.

Q. What is the Christian name, the given name? -
A. E. J. Sharpe.

Q. What does the E. stand for? -
A. Emily Jane Sharpe.

Q. How old are you. Mrs. Sharpe? -
A. About 72 or 73, going on, past 72 a little.

Q. How long have you been living in the Indian Territory? -
A. About 28 years.

Q. Where did you come from? -
A. No, sir; I will take that back. I lived in Texas two years before I moved up here. I have been here about 27 or 28 years since I have been here in the Territory.

Q. You say you lived two years in Texas? -
A. Yes, sir; we started here and stopped there about two years.

Q. Where did you start from? -
A. Mississippi.

Q. What place in Mississippi?-
A. Hinds County.

Q. When you came to the Territory did you take up any land of your own or rent land? -
A. No, sir; that’s what we came here, was to get on my place with the children, but they never gave us none, and been trying though all the while.

Q. Did you ever go before the Choctaw Council? -
A. Yes, sir; but they rejected us.

Q. Can you remember the year you were before the council? -
A. It’s been about – I don’t recollect exactly – it’s about, I guess it’s been about 11 years going on 12 since I went before them – but he rejected all of us there.

Q. I am not talking about the Dawes Commission; I am talking about the Indian council itself.-
A. No sir; I didn’t go before them.

Q. Who was your mother Mrs. Sharpe? -
A. She was a Moore.

Q. Full name? -
A. McLemore was my father’s wife. My father, his name was Ebenezer Moore, and he married a McLemore.

Q. Your father, yon say, was Ebenezer Moore? -
A. Yes sir.

Q. Who was his father? -
A. Silas Moore.

Q. Where did lie live?-
A. Mississippi.

Q. Who was his father? -
A. John Moore.

Q. Do you know who Silas Moore’s mother was? -
A. I think she was Nancy; I never did see her: I think her name was Nancy.

Q. Do you know what her last name was? -
A. No, sir; we always called her “grandma.”

Q. Yon saw Silas Moore, did you? -
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you ever see John Moore? -
A. No, sir; If I did I don’t recollect it. I knowed him from – yes sir: he used to be – but I was so small; yes. I have seen him, but I was very little then and I don’t recollect much about him.

Q. Was Nancy Indian or white? -
A. Yes sir; she was full blood.

Q. What was John Moore? -
A. I don’t think there was much Indian about him; he was part: anyhow, he got his lands and his home: he got it from his wife’s side.

Q. You spoke of John Moore having land. Did he get it in Mississippi? -
A. Yes, sir; he lived there and got land there.

Q. Do you know that he got it from the Government? -
A. Yes sir: he taken up, I think, just like we ought to, you know; I think that is the way he got his home there in an early day.

Q. Do you know how much he got? -
A. No, sir; I just recollect him as our great-grandfather, and then we left there and came to Texas, my grandfather did, and we left him back there and he was there, the last I knew of him, in Mississippi.

Q. What county was that in?-
A. Hinds County. If I ain’t mistaken; lived just 10 miles of Jackson, and Jackson was the county sent.

Q. Do you know when Silas Moore died?-
A. Yes. sir: I heard about it. I don’t know as I could tell to a day now, but of course I heard about it as soon as we had time: I wasn’t there when he died.

Q. About how many years ago did he die?-
A. Well, my remembrance-here’s his daughter; it’s her-she knows now. I expect. He died at their house, and he went and lived with his son.

Q. How many children have you Mrs. Sharpe:-
A. Six.

Q. Did they come to the Territory with you?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. What are their names-their full names?-
A. Silas Sharpe and Richard Sharpe and Edward Sharpe, and then I got three girls.

Q. Now, wait before you give the girls’ names; how old Is Silas Sharpe now?-
A. Well, I just don’t know whether I can tell exactly or not. I know my own age and I know he’s just

Q. He is here, is he?-
A. Yes. sir: he’s about-I could give It to you If I would study a little; I expect he is close on to 50 or maybe 52.

Q. Then about how old is Richard?-
A. He’s 28.

Q. Richard Sharpe is
A. Twenty-eight.

Q. How old is Edward?-
A. He’s about 27.

Q. You say you have three girls?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. What are their names?-
A. One is a Vinyard and the other a Jones- Rhoda Vinyard.

Q. Rhoda Vinyard?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. How old is she?-
A. I don’t know; I never do pay no attention to It. There’s about two years’ difference in them all the way down, but I expect Rhoda won’t miss 40 far.

Q. Do yon want to say 40?-
A. About 40. I guess.

Q. What is your next girl?-
A. Liza.

Q. Is she married?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. What is her married mime?-
A. Jones: she’s about 42.

Q. About 42?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now the other one?-
A. She’s about 30; that’s Mrs. Ella Hendrix.

Q. Now, have all these children of yours children of their own?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did they appear before the commission at the time you appeared before It?-
A. Yes, sir: nearly all of us went before it.

Q. Was application made at that time for all your children and grandchildren?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you think that was about 11 years ago?-
A. Yes, sir; as well as I recollect, or maybe 12.

Q. At what place, do you remember?-
A. Yes: Muskogee. I believe; I don’t recollect, but I think it was Muskogee was where we went before the Dawes Commission.

Q. Do you know the names of Silas’s children?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Can you give them?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. State them, please.-
A. Willie Peteet. Do you want their names as they’re married.

Q. If they are married, state their married names.-
A. Well, that’s It- Willie Peteet.

Q. All right: next one?-
A. Orvie.

Q. Is that a boy?-
A. Yes sir: Orvie Sharpe, he’s grown and married; and then Claud.

Q. Is he married?-
A. No sir: and then Edgar.

Q. Is he married?-
A. No sir: and Freddie and Ola and Rob and Conrad.

Q. How old is the youngest one. do you know?-
A. He’s going on 2 years old; just can stand alone and walk.

Q. Do you know Richard Sharpe’s children?-
A. Yes sir.

Q. Name them.-
A. Lottie and Floyd and Nora.

Q. Any of these married?-
A. No sir: and little Richard, the baby.

Q. Has Edward any children?-
A. Yes sir: he has two.

Q. Name them.-
A. The boy’s name is Shawnee and the girl’s name-I never did think I would like it well enough to call it.

By Mr. Pollock:

Q. How old are they. Mrs. Sharpe?-
A. Them little ones?

Q. Yes.-
A. One’s about 4 and the other one’s about 2. I guess, the baby one.

Q. Now, Rhoda has she any children’:-
A. Yes, sir; she has six.

Q. Name those, please.-
A. Ollie Tucker.

Q. Now the next one?-
A. Jennie Vinyard, Vernie Vinyard, and then Gracie Vinyard and Arthur Vinyard and the other one-what is his name, that little mean scamp?

Q. Is that the youngest one’:-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. How old is he?;-
A. He’s about 13 or 14.

Q. Now has Liza children’;-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Name her children.-
A. Jack and Melvin; them’s the boys.

Q. Jack and Melvin Jones is that correct?-
A. No; they are not Joneses; she’s been married twice.

Q. What are their names?-
A. Harringtons: and Rosa, that’s her girl; and then she has got two more Joneses; she’s been married the second time.

Q. What are the two Jones children’s names?-
A. Well. I don’t know; just got to think and study. One is about 11 years old and the other one, I expect, is 7 or 8.

Q. Well, now, Mrs. Sharpe do you know how old the youngest Jones is’:- A. She’s about 5 or 6. or maybe 7 or 8.

Q. Let’s get the names of Ella’s children.-
A. She has three.

Q. Ella Hendrix, that is?-
A. Yes, sir. There is Arthur and Bud, he is about 14, and then Charlie, he’s the oldest one, he’s 18.

Q. How old is Arthur, do you know’:-
A. He’s about 9.

Q. Do you know about how old Jack Harrington Is?-
A. About 18 or 19.

Q. Do you know how old Melton Harrington is?-
A. About 17.

Q. How old is Rosa Harrington’:-
A. She’s about-I guess about 25. Now them there two Jones children, it is Ethel and Jennie; that little one was named after me.

Q. How old is Ethel’:-
A. About 10 years old.

Q. How old is Jennie?-
A. About 6. I reckon.

Q. Arthur Vinyard, how old is lie?-
A. He’s about 18.

Q. Now Gracie Vinyard?-
A. Eleven.

Q. Vernie Vinyard?-
A. She’s about 18.

Q. Jennie Vinyard?-
A. She’s going on 20.

Q. How old is Ollie Tucker?-
A. About 23 or 24.

Q. Now then, Richard’s children: how old is Lottie?-
A. Going on 13.

Q. Floyd?-
A. Eleven.

Q. How old Is Nora?-
A. She’s about 3 years old.

Q. How old is Richard?-
A. Little over a year old.

Q. Now, have you thought of the name of Rhoda’s last boy?-
A. Robert.

Q. How old is he?-
A. He’s about 14.

Q. Robert Vinyard is 14?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. Mrs. Sharpe what relation are you to Mollie Pirtle-
A. Well, she is my own cousin.

Q. On which side of the family?-
A. Moore aide.

Q. Who was her mother?-
A. Well. I know if I could think of it. Sho married my uncle; she was a Hudson; she was a widow woman when she married my uncle.

‘Q. Who was Mollie Pirtle’s father?-
A. Simpson Moore.

Q. Was he a brother of your father?-
A. Brother to my father.

Q. Were you ever on the land that John Moore got from the Government in Mississippi?-
A. Yes. sir: I guess I was born on that place, as well as I know, but I was little and of course I don’t know nothing about that, or not on my great-grandfather’s side. Now. Silas Moore was my grandpa, the father of these boys.

Q. But that was on the old John Moore place?-
A. That’s what they called it and it was his place, and that’s all I know about It; and my father lived there a year or two when they was first married, but we never stayed there long.

Q. Can you give me the names of all John Moore’s children?-
A. None but grand pap and Martin.

Q That would be Silas and Martin?-
A. Them’s all the two I could recollect and know well, and I Just can barely recollect seeing him, and we all lived there when I was small.

Q. Didn’t have any girls, did he?-
A. I don’t recollect: I don’t know.

Q Did you ever hear of any?-A. No sir; I never paid no attention that far back; just know and know he was and just heard my folks talk, and I was so small I don’t recollect nothing about how he looked.

Mr. Rodgers. Have they any tribal recognition In Indian Territory?

Mr. Lee. No, sir. Now, you mean by that no tribal enrollment or no tribal act of council?

Mr. Rodgers. Yes. Mr. Lee. No; we don’t make that claim.

By Mr. Pollock:

Q. Mrs. Sharpe how much Indian blood do you think you have?-
A. I think I just get my blood from my great-grandfather, and we know it came from there.

Q. Your great-grandfather was n half blood?-
A. Yes. sir-I don’t know- some said he was full blood and some said half, but I don’t know nothing about that: but some said full blood and some said he wasn’t; some said our great-grandmother was a full-blooded Indian.

Q. Your great-grandmother was a full-blood Indian?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. And your great-grandfather, it is said, had some Indian blood?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, then, that is where you trace your Indian blood?-
A. Yes sir; that’s where I go to get It.

Q. Now, there was none of the others-of the Moores-married Indians that you know of?-
A. No sir; not that I know of. Some said they married partly Indian, but it was all white fellows as far as I knowed.

(Witness excused.)


Silas Sharpe, being duly sworn and examined as a witness, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lee:

Q. State your full name, please.-
A. Silas Sharpe.

Q. How old are you, Mr. Sharpe?-
A. I am 52.

Q. Where do you live?-
A. I live at Ravia, Okla.

Q. How long have you been living there?-
A. I have been in and around Ravia, within 8 or 4 miles of Ravia, about 26 years-25 or 26 years.

Q. Who is your mother?-
A. This lady here.

Q. What is her name?-
A. Emily Jane Sharpe.

Q. Did you come to the Indian Territory at the same time she did?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. Who is your father?-
A. Jack Sharpe.

Q. Did you ever go before the Dawes Commission?-
A. Yes, sir.

Q. Whereabouts?-
A. At Atoka.

Q. Do you remember the year?-
A. Well, it was there about 1897 or 1898- thereabout them times. They were at Colbert, and went from there to Atoka.

Q. You don’t state the year definitely, but to the best of your recollection?- A’. No. sir: but it was about that time.

Q. Was your mother with you at that time?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. Did she go before the commission?-
A. Well, she went before the commission, and her and I-I went before the commission and they called her; and they kept me before them about three minutes, asked me a few questions, end said they couldn’t do anything for me: and I told them my mother wanted to get before them, and they asked her a few questions and said they couldn’t do anything for her.

Q. Do you remember what commissioner it was-that is, his name?-
A. I don’t know his name. There was a commissioner there with a committee of our people. Indians with them.

Q. Name any of the Indians with them?-
A. No sir; I never heard any of the names called. I didn’t stay there but a minute after I found out I couldn’t do anything; just asked me how long I had been here, and so on, and then I left.

Q. Give the names of your children, please. Give the name and age of each one.-
A. Norby Sharpe is 24 years old, Ola Sharpe the oldest girl.

Q. How old is she?-
A. She would be about 22 now if she was living; she’s dead.

Q. When did she die?-
A. She’s been dead about 11 years.

Q. Next one?-
A. The next one is Willie Peteet now; she’s married.

Q. How old is she’s-
A. She’s about 19 or 20.

Q. Has she any children?-
A. No. sir.

Q. Next one?-
A. Claud.

Q. How old is he?-
A. Claud is about 18.

Q. Single man?-
A. Yes; he’s a single man.

Q. Next child?-
A. Edgnr.

Q. How old is Edgar?-
A. Edgar is about 14.

Q. Next one?-
A. Fred.

Q. How old Is he?-
A. About 12.

Q. Next one?-
A. Well, Nola, a girl.

Q. How old is she? -
A. She’s about 9 years old.

Q. Next child?-
A. Bob.

Q. How old is Bob?-
A. Bob’s 4 years old.

Q. Then your next one? -
A. Conrad.

Q. How old is he? -
A. About 9 months.

Q. Can you give the date of the birth of Bob: the month and year would probably he sufficient? -
A. I don’t believe I can give the date.

Q. Can’t you state the month or year he was born in? -
A. Seems like It might have been In May, but I have forgotten what day of the month.

By Mr. Pollock:

Q. What year? Can you give the year? -
A. It was in 1906, and I believe It was – 1906 in August, I believe: I believe he was born in August.

Q. Four years last August? -
A. Yes, sir; that’s about as near as I can tell you.

By Mr. Lee:

Q. Do you mean this last August just past? -
A. Yes, sir: 4 years old this last August: that’s the date.

Q. You have heard the testimony just given by your mother a few moments ago. did you? -
A. Yes. sir.

Q. Did you think she stated the names and ages correctly of your brothers’ and sisters’ children? -
A. Just about as near as I could. I have a brother not in Oklahoma, she never gave his name In.

Q. Did he ever live In the Territory? -
A. No, sir: never did come to the Territory.

Q. He never made any application? -
A. No, sir.

By Mr. Rodgers:

Q. These others that she gave all came at the same time you did? -
A. Yes, sir.

Q. And have lived here ever since? -
A. Yes. sir.

By Mr. Lee:

Q. Do you remember ever seeing any patent or paper of John Moore’s or Silas Moore’s for the land they had in Mississippi? -
A. No.

(Witness excused.)


Emily Jane Sharpe recalled, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lee:

Q. Mrs. Sharpe, do you remember seeing any patent or other paper with to the title to the land that John Moore or Silas Moore was on back there in Mississippi? -
A. I don’t know: my uncle – my grandfather – the house got burned up and we have never seen it, and I guess that is where his business all went.

Q. Did you ever see n paper of that kind? -
A. No, sir; not as I know of. I can’t read: I never went to school in my life.

(Witness excused.)


Silas Sharpe recalled, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lee:

Q. I will ask you if you ever appeared before the commission at any other time than the time you mentioned in your testimony? -
A. Yes, sir: I appeared before them at Atoka.

Q. The second time at Atoka? -
A. Yes. sir.

Q. What year was that: do you know?-
A. Well. I don’t know; let’s see -

Q. How many years after your first application? -
A. About four years after my first application. I was just studying about what year it was. Seems it was about 1903 or 1902 – somewhere along there.

Q. Did you have your mother there as a witness? -
A. No. sir; she wouldn’t go nowhere. She was turned out, and I couldn’t get her nowhere before them again. There was no one went before them but me.

This evidence is to be considered also in the Mollie Pirtle case and Silas Sharpe case. (See Mississippi Choctaw applications numbered M. C. R. 3029 and 3540.)

(Witness excused.)


Mollie Pirtle, being duly sworn and examined as a witness, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lee:

Q. Mrs. Pirtle, did you hear the testimony of Mrs. Sharpe this morning?- A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember her stating who your mother was?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. Who did she say your mother was?-
A. Said she was a Hudson.

Q. Is that correct?-
A. It is correct In one sense of the word; she married Hudson and then married my father; but her name, her original name, was a Morris.

Q. Was Morris her maiden name?-
A. Yes. sir.

Q. And then she married Hudson?-
A. Yes, sir: he died in the war, and then she married my father; my father was Simpson Moore.

(Witness excused.)


Albert G. McMillan, being duly sworn, states that he reported the proceedings had in the above-entitled cause and that the foregoing is a true and correct transcript of his stenographic notes.

Albert G. McMillan.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 12th day of December 1910.
[seal.] Harby Montague,
Notary Public.



MLA Source Citation:

United States Congress. Five Civilized Tribes In Oklahoma, Reports of the Department of the Interior and Evidentiary Papers in support of S. 7625, a Bill for the Relief of Certain Members of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, Sixty-second Congress, Third Session. Department of the Interior, United States. 1913. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 30 July 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/silas-sharp-mississippi-choctaw.htm - Last updated on Oct 15th, 2012


Categories: ,
Topics: ,

Surnames:

Contribute to the Conversation!

Our "rules" are simple. Keep the conversation on subject and mind your manners! If this is your first time posting, we do moderate comments before we let them appear... so give us a while to get to them. Once we get to know you here, we'll remove that requirement.

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Newsletter Signup

We currently provide two newsletters. Why not take both for a run?

Genealogy Update: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new, or significantly updated, collection or database on our website.

Circle of Nations: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new (or significantly updated) Native American collection or database on our website.

Once you've clicked on the Subscribe button above you'll receive an email from us requesting confirmation. You must confirm the email before you will be able to receive any newsletter.