R. Hager and S. Loman, Choctaw

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R. Hagar and S. Loman

Hugo, Okla., February 28, 1912

Chas. D. Carter, Esq..
Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. Carter: You will remember I wrote you some time ago with reference to the claims of a number of Choctaw Indians with whom I have contracts to get them enrolled. I have taken the testimony in behalf of a large number of them (75 in all), which will be properly submitted.

I desire to ask your aid in behalf of just two of them-these being the only two that I know personally, of my own knowledge, should be enrolled. The first is Sylvester Loman, a full-blood Indian boy, 22 years of age, the son of Elias Loman and Sarah Jackson-an illegitimate. He is penniless and absolutely friendless, being deserted by both his father and mother. I have ample proof that he is a full-blood Choctaw Indian, born in 1892, at Antlers. This proof I have sent to Washington to Webster Ballinger. This boy needs his allotment, and I want him to get it, whether I ever receive a cent for it or not.

The other case is that of R. Hagar, whom I believe you know. This is a simple-minded old man who employed a “quack” attorney several years ago to get him enrolled, and he thought until 1906 that he had been enrolled. Now his witnesses are dead. His father was Sterling Hagar, an Indian by blood, and lived near Idabel at an old trading post called Eagletown. R. Hagar was born in the Choctaw Nation, and is now past 70 years of age. He served in the Civil War, joining at Mena, Ark. I have known him 12 years, and I know several Indians who will swear they are kin, or they have always understood they were kin, but none of them can trace it past the present generation. I believe you are acquainted with this old man, and if so you know, as I do, that he has always been recognized as an Indian by blood and always voted in the tribal elections, ever since the Civil War. I ask your aid in these two because I know that justice will be done if these two are put on: and the last one, at least, it is not likely I can get on without your aid. The other cases I have. I think, are also meritorious, but as I do not know of my own knowledge I do not ask you to trouble about them. These I know to be worthy and entitled to an allotment, and I think you will be doing your full duty to extend your kindly offices to their assistance.

With best personal regards, I remain,
Yours, very truly,
E. D. Copping.


State Of Oklahoma, Le Flore County, ss:

Caroline Jackson, being duly sworn, on oath states: I live at Poteau, Okla., in Le Flore County. I am about 50 years old. I was born and raised In the Choctaw Nation, Ind. T. I know Sarah Jackson. She is my sister-in-law. I knew Ellias Loman in his lifetime. I knew him about eight or nine years. He was a full-blood Choctaw Indian. He lived near Antlers, In the Choctaw Nation, Ind. T. I also know Sylvester Loman. He is the son of Elias Loman and Sarah Jackson. I was present when Sylvester Loman was born and have known him all his life. Elias Loman’s father was named Jim Loman, and he had a brother named Clay Loman. Elias Loman’s wife was named Narcissy Loman. She is now dead, and Elias Loman is also dead.

Clay Loman’s wife was named Sillen Loman, and she is still alive. She lives near Antlers, Okla.

Sylvester Loman is living at Poteau, Okla., with his mother, Sarah Jackson.

Caroline (her x mark) Jackson.

Witness to mark:
Eben L. Taylor.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of February 1912.

[seal.] Eben L. Taylor, Notary Public.
My commission expires May 30, 1912.


State Of Oklahoma, Le Flore County, ss:

Sarah Jackson, being duly sworn, on oath states: I live at Poteau, Le Flore County, Okla. I am 49 years old. I was born in the Choctaw Nation. Ind. T., in what was then Cedar County, near Doaksville. I lived in that neighborhood around Doaksville and Antlers all my life until I moved to Poteau, about two mouths ago. I knew Elias Loman in his lifetime. He was a full-blood Choctaw Indian. I knew him about six years. I also know Sylvester Loman. He is my son and the son of Elias Loman. I was never married to Elias Loman, but lived with him for about six months at Antlers, in the Choctaw Nation, Ind. T., and Sylvester Loman is our child. Sylvester Loman was born July 27, 1892, at Antlers. In the Choctaw Nation. Ind. T., and has lived in Indian Territory and Oklahoma all his life.

Elias Loman’s father was named Jim Loman, and Elias Loman had a brother named Clay Loman, who was enrolled as a member of the Choctaw Tribe of Indians. Elias Loman died before he was placed on the final rolls. Clay Loman’s wife was named Sillen Loman, and she is still living near Antlers, Okla. Clay Loman and Sillen Loman have a son named Wilken Loman, who is living near Antlers, Okla.

Elias Loman’s wife was named Nareissy Loman. She was enrolled as a Choctaw Indian. She died about eight or nine years ago.

Sylvester Loman is living with me, and has lived with me all his life.

Sarah (her x mark) Jackson.

Witness to mark:
Eben L. Taylor.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of February 1912.
[seal.! Eben L. Taylor, Notary Public.
My commission expires May 30, 1915.

Clay Loman, brother of applicant’s father, is enrolled on the finally approved rolls, No. 4524, as a Choctaw by blood, together with his wife, Sillen Loman, and son, Wilken Loman, enrolled opposite Nos. 4525 and 4526 respectively.

The cases of R. Hagar and Sylvester Loman are submitted by

E. D. Copping,
Webster Ballinger, Attorneys

Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma

Notes About the Book:

Source:  Five Civilized Tribes In Oklahoma, Reports of the Department of the Interior and Evidentiary Papers in support of S. 7625, a Bill for the Relief of Certain Members of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, Sixty-second Congress, Third Session, Published 1913, by the Department of the Interior, United States.

Online Publication: The manuscript was scanned and then ocr’d. Minimal editing has been done, and readers can and should expect some errors in the textual output. Several spellings have been used for the same tribe of Indians.


This site includes some historical materials that may imply negative stereotypes reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record and should not be interpreted to mean that the WebMasters in any way endorse the stereotypes implied.



MLA Source Citation:

United States Congress. Five Civilized Tribes In Oklahoma, Reports of the Department of the Interior and Evidentiary Papers in support of S. 7625, a Bill for the Relief of Certain Members of the Five Civilized Tribes in Oklahoma, Sixty-second Congress, Third Session. Department of the Interior, United States. 1913. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 2 September 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/r-hager-and-s-loman-choctaw.htm - Last updated on Oct 28th, 2013


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