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Other Muskogee Towns and Villages

Besides the recognized tribes or towns of major importance and such of their offshoots as can be identified, the literature of this region contains many names of towns or villages which can not be definitely connected with any of those given. In some cases it may be that we have to deal with ancient divisions in process of decline which were never connected with the rest, but in at least nine-tenths of the cases they are nothing more than temporary offshoots of the larger bodies.

Opilłåko (“Big Swamp”) seems to have been one of the most ancient and important of these. It appears as far back as 1733, on the De Crenay map.1 It appears also in the census lists of 1750 and 1760,2 but not in that of 1761. The trader located there in 1797 was Hendrik Dargin.3 Swan spells the name ”Pinclatchas,”4 and Hawkins has the following description:

O-pil-thluc-co; from O-pil-lo-wau, a swamp; and thluc-co, big. It is situated on a creek of that name, which joins Puc-cun-tal-lau-has-see on the left side. It is 20 miles from Coosau River; the land about this village is round, flat hills, thickets of hickory saplings, and on the hillsides and their tops, hickory grub and grapevines. The land bordering on the creek is rich, and here are their fields.5

The town does not appear in the census list of 1832, and seems to have vanished out of the memories of the living Indians. By his classification of Opilłåko, Hawkins clearly indicates that he considered it a branch of one of the other towns. It is probably the Weypulco of the Mitchell map (pl. 6).

Hawkins thus describes another branch village:

Pin-e-hoo-te; from pin-e-wau [pinwa], a turkey, and ehoo-te [huti], house. It is on the right side of a fine little creek, a branch of E-pe-sau-gee. The land is stiff and rich, and lies well; the timber is red oak and hickory, the branches all have reed, and the land on them, above the settlement, is good black oak, sapling, and hickory. This and the neighboring land is fine for settlement; they have here three or four houses only, some peach trees and hogs, and their fields are fenced. The path from New-yau-cau to Cow-e-tuh-tal-lau-has-see passes by these houses.6

Another town of the same name was in Bibb County, Alabama, east of Cahaba River, opposite the mouth of Shuts Creek.7

There is very much less information regarding the other villages, and I will arrange them alphabetically with the few facts we have concerning them appended:

Footnotes

  1. Plate 5; also Hamilton, Col. Mobile, p. 190. 

  2. MS., Ayer Lib.; Miss. Prov. Arch., I. p. 96. 

  3. Ga. Hist. Soc. Colls., IX, p. 170. 

  4. Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, V, p. 262. 

  5. Ga. Hist. Soc. Colls., III, p. 50. 

  6. Ga. Hist. Soc. Colls., III, p. 50. 

  7. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 50. 

  8. Gatschet, Creek Mig. Leg., II, p. 182 [214]; Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 391. 

  9. Eighteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., map of Alabama. 

  10. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 43. 

  11. Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, V, p. 262. 

  12. Ga. Col. Docs., VIII p. 523. 

  13. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 43. 

  14. MSS., Ayer Lib. 

  15. Jefferys, French Dom., I, p. 134, map, 1761; Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 44; Woodward Reminiscences, p. 37. 

  16. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 44. 

  17. Gatschct in Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 395, quoting Drake, Book of Indians (1848), IV, p. 55. 

  18. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 44. 

  19. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 44. 

  20. Royce in Eighteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., pl. CVIII, 1899. 

  21. Woodward, Reminiscences, p. 37, 1859; Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 45. 

  22. Hawkins in Ga. Hist. Soc. Colls., IX, p. 173. 

  23. Thirteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., map of Alabama. 

  24. Amer. State Papers, Ind. Aff., I, p. 289. 

  25. Ibid.,II, p. 372. 

  26. Copy of MS in Ayer Coll., Newberry Lib., Chicago, vols, on Indian Trade, II, p. 35. 

  27. Senate Doc. 512, 23d Cong., 1st sess., IV, pp. 319-320. 

  28. See p. 270; Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 48. 

  29. Senate Doc. 512, 23d Cong., 1st sess., IV, pp. 301-302. 

  30. Morse, Rept. to Sec. of War, p. 364. 

  31. Royce in Eighteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., pl. CVIII, 1899. 

  32. Gatschet, Creek Mig. Leg., I, p. 130. 

  33. Senate Doc. 512, 23d Cong., 1st sess., IV, pp. 359-363. 

  34. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 46. 

  35. Gatschet, Creek Mig. Leg., I, p. 133; Misc. Coll. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 399; Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 47. 

  36. Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 403. 

  37. Pickett, Hist. Ala., II, p. 294. 

  38. Ruidiaz, La Florida, II, p. 485. See plate R. 

  39. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 48. 

  40. Woodward, Reminiscenses, p. 37, 1859. mentions a band of Upper Creek Indians of this name. They seem to have been located near Tukabahchee.

  41. NIPKY. McCall ((Hist. Ga., I, p. 367. 

  42. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 48. 

  43. Eighteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., pl. CVIII. 

  44. Gatschet in Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 407. 

  45. Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, V, p. 282. 

  46. Ga. Col. Docs., VIII, p. 523. 

  47. Senate Doc. 512, 23d Cong., 1st sess., IV, pp. 313-315. 

  48. Ruidiaz, La Florida, II, p. 484. 

  49. Ga. Col. Docs., VII, p. 427. 

  50. Gatschet in Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 410. 

  51. Senate Doc. 512, 23d Cong. , 1st sess., IV, p. 334; Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, IV, p. 578. 

  52. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 51. 

  53. Adair, Hist. Am. Inds., p. 242. 

  54. Gatschet, Creek Mig. Leg., I, p. 146; Misc. Colls. Ala. Hist. Soc., I, p. 411. 

  55. De Brahm, Hist. Prov. of Ga., p. 54. 

  56. Handbook Ala. Anth. Soc. for 1920, p. 52. 

  57. Royce in Eighteenth Ann. Rept. Bur. Amer. Ethn., pl. CVIII.