Northern Division Family Groups

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ocalized family groups of which I have information are all in the northern division, to which White Moon belongs. He is less familiar with the family groupings in the southern division; he opines that in the southern division there is less concentration by family.

Kuhaiyu

Here there are four houses occupied by several descendants of Gen. I, 1 and 2, White Moon’s paternal grandparents.

House 1: Enoch Hoag (Gen. I, 7), chief; and his wife, a Delaware; and their daughter and son-in-law. (Their son lives at Lookeba, his wife’s home.)

House 2: Sam Houston (Gen. I, 24); and his wife, Bertha Deer, a Muskogee, and their daughter; and Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46), maternal cousin of Sam Houston.

House 3: Seywit’ (Gen. I, 28); and her husband, Little-boy; and their son. (Visited by her sister, Little-girl and family; but Littlegirl lives at her husband’s settlement, Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

House 4: Little-black-head (Gen. I, 44) and his wife, Elsie Hendricks (Gen. I, 45, probably the daughter of Gen. I, 21); and their child. (Visited by his mother, Mrs. Curly; but Mrs. Curly lives at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

In this settlement there is a fifth house, now empty, but formerly occupied by cousins of Enoch Hoag. There is also an earth house, a square dugout, with peak roof of timber,[1] in which before he died lived Biskuachu, Sam Houston’s father’s parallel cousin.

Comparison with the table, Genealogy I, shows that the settlement is composed of the descendants of two sisters and of two brothers, of whom one survives. A female cousin of theirs (Gen. I, 21) and her family used to live in this settlement.

Kudadosa

(“Hill surrounded by trees”)[2]

This is the settlement of White Moon’s mother’s people, in which he grew up. The settlement consists of four houses, in which live the descendants of a sister and brother and of the brother’s wife’s sister or parallel cousin.

House 1: Sho’sin (Gen. II, 6); and her husband, David Shemamy; and the children of a daughter deceased.

House 2: Ch´’uu (Gen. II, 15); and her husband, Tom Williams (her two first husbands also lived here); and her deceased daughter’s son. (Her daughter and son-in-law lived here.) Before their marriage all the children of a deceased female cousin (Gen. II, 19) of Ch´’uu lived with her. Of these Seyhut’ (Gen. II, 45) and her husband and children visit Ch´’uu , but Seyhut’ now lives at Nahaine, her second husband’s home. With Ch´’uu  also lives Grasshopper (Gen. II, 5), an old man whose relationship is obscure. He went to live with Ch´’uu after his wife died. He had no children.

House 3: Belongs to Chu”u°; it harbors Seyhut’ and her family en visite.

House 4: Sachanatih (Gen. II, 14), widow of Ch´’uu  brother; and her children, a daughter and her husband and children, and three unmarried daughters. Her married son lives at Spring Creek, but with his family is often at his mother’s.

NaDacGathaGaiyu’

(at White-bread’s) or Nakahdi (at the chief’s) (one mile east of Kudadosa)

Here are two houses in one of which live the widow of Chief White-bread, her daughter and son-in-law, Ralph Maro’; in the other of which live the old lady’s daughter’s daughter, Cho’otan’ or Grace Aiken and her husband, Gunchaiyo (Whitehead) or Paul Frank.

Nahaine

(Near Minco)

Here some of the Haine-speaking people had lived; but they moved away; the only survivor is Cry-baby or Ross Maro’ (Gen. II, 47), brother of Ralph Marc’ who lives with his wife at Chief White-bread’s.

House 1: Ross Maro’; and his wife Seyhut’; and their children; and Maro”s father, “when he is at home,” not on the move trailing gaming parties and death feasts. The maternal aunt as well as the mother of the Maro’ brothers had lived here.

House 2: Levi Frank (Nehaihi, Levi) and his wife.

House 3: Chonest’iti, Sam Black, who lives alone. As far as known he was never married.

Naikutsi[3]

or Spring Creek

The localized family groups of which I have information are all in the northern division, to which White Moon belongs. He is less familiar with the family groupings in the southern division; he opines that in the southern division there is less concentration by family.

Kuhaiyu

Here there are four houses occupied by several descendants of Gen. I, 1 and 2, White Moon’s paternal grandparents.

House 1: Enoch Hoag (Gen. I, 7), chief; and his wife, a Delaware; and their daughter and son-in-law. (Their son lives at Lookeba, his wife’s home.)

House 2: Sam Houston (Gen. I, 24); and his wife, Bertha Deer, a Muskogee, and their daughter; and Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46), maternal cousin of Sam Houston.

House 3: Seywit’ (Gen. I, 28); and her husband, Little-boy; and their son. (Visited by her sister, Little-girl and family; but Littlegirl lives at her husband’s settlement, Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

House 4: Little-black-head (Gen. I, 44) and his wife, Elsie Hendricks (Gen. I, 45, probably the daughter of Gen. I, 21); and their child. (Visited by his mother, Mrs. Curly; but Mrs. Curly lives at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

In this settlement there is a fifth house, now empty, but formerly occupied by cousins of Enoch Hoag. There is also an earth house, a square dugout, with peak roof of timber,1 in which before he died lived Biskuachu, Sam Houston’s father’s parallel cousin.

Comparison with the table, Genealogy I, shows that the settlement is composed of the descendants of two sisters and of two brothers, of whom one survives. A female cousin of theirs (Gen. I, 21) and her family used to live in this settlement.

Kudadosa

(“Hill surrounded by trees”)[4]

This is the settlement of White Moon’s mother’s people, in which he grew up. The settlement consists of four houses, in which live the descendants of a sister and brother and of the brother’s wife’s sister or parallel cousin.

House 1: Sho’sin (Gen. II, 6); and her husband, David Shemamy; and the children of a daughter deceased.

House 2: Lottie Pardon (Gen. II, 43) daughter of Minnie; and her husband Tila.

House 3: Helen Pardon, daughter of Minnie; and her husband, Thompson Williams; and Charlie Williams, younger brother of Thompson Williams. (Cousins, Nettie Pardon (Gen. I, 37) and Mrs. Sam Binger (Gen. II, 41) grew up here.)

House 4: Mother of Thompson and Charlie Williams; and her husband Ba’tshush (Tail-cut-off) or K’akitsaiyet’ (Chewed-up) or Benjamin Franklin.

House 5: Kaiyot’iti and his wife.

House 6: Sadie, the daughter of Kaiyot’iti’s wife; and her husband Frank Sargent (Gen. I, 19).

House 7: Johnson Coffee; and his wife who is the sister of Frank Sargent.

House 8: Little-girl, daughter of Kaiyot’iti and his wife; and her husband Chanatih (Gen. II, 30) and child.

House 9: Little-old-woman (Gen. II, 32), sister of Chanatih; and her husband, Little-brave; and two sons, Roy and Bill-when they are not at Kudadosa.

House 10: George Shiyatsi (Youth), related to Little-brave and his father, Hadunko (Shorty).

House 11: Simona who is maternal uncle to George Shiyatsi; and his wife.

Naigaswit’iti

Boggy Creek

Here in separate houses live or lived three sisters, whose mother, Sadipa, Mrs. Long, lived here. The sisters are Sawashish, Mrs. Osage, wife of Washish, Osage, who is, however, a Caddo; Mrs. Mike Williams; Sabinsin, mother of Vincent Johnson and Anna Johnson. Sabinsin has moved away, to Mrs. Peach Orchard’s where she lives with her second husband, Tsa’bata, Mr. Fish or Charlie Adams (Gen. II, 22). Here also lived White-bead, the mother of four men who still live here. White-bead herself has moved away. The four men are Stanley (Washish) and Jerome Age and Frank and Joe White-bead.

House 1: Sawashish; and her husband Washish or Stanley Age.

House 2: Mrs. Mike Williams; and her husband, Mike Williams.

House 3: Jerome Age, brother of Stanley Age; and his wife.

House 4: T’ahsisi or Frank White-bead; and his wife, Lyda Penn.

House 5: Joe White-bead, brother of Frank White-bead; and his wife.

House 6: Hadoshkatsi, Stiff (commonly translated Mr. Strong-man). He is a kinsman of Sadipa and of White-bead. Inferably Sadipa and White-bead are related. Stiff is a widower, living alone.

House 7: His daughter, Bessie Wolf, and her husband, a White man.

House 8: Gantino, Red-head, or Patrick Miller, related to Stiff and to Sadipa and his wife, a White woman.

Nasakaas

at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s[5]

Here lives, excepting one household, a single family connection, the Shemamys who are Muskogee.

House l: Sakaas, Mrs. Peach Orchard, widow of Tom Shemamy.

House 2: Daughter of Mrs. Peach Orchard; and her husband, Tsa’wetsita (Mr. Wichita, he is a Wichita); and their children.

House 3: John Shemamy or Tsa’owisha, brother of Tom Shemamy; and his wife, Saowisha; and their son, James Shemamy or Dwi’sha and daughter-in-law, Little-girl (Gen. I, 26).

House 4: Sister of John and Tom Shemamy (also David Shemamy, see Gen. II, 7) and her widowed daughter, Mrs. Curly or Margaret Deer (Gen. I, 14).

House 5: Sam Binger (Binka) (Gen. II, 40) who is a connection through marriage of the Shemamys; and his wife.

House 6: Tsa’bata, Mr. Fish or Charlie Adams (Gen. II, 22); and his wife, Sabinsin.

(Northeast of White-bread’s)

This is the home of two sisters, Spibook.

House 1: Spibook; and her husband, Bob Dunlip (Gen. I, 5).[6]

House 2: Nyuda[7] (Spibook); and her husband, Charlie Pardon.

Another sister who lived here died. (James Spibook, their brother, has also died. He was the first husband of Helen Pardon, sister of Charlie Pardon. See Spring Creek.)

K’ok’anina

(Water-lying lake) (South of Binger)

House 1: Widow of Hina’kahdi (Snow-chief); and a daughter, who is separated from her husband.

House 2: Oldest daughter of a daughter of Snow-chief’s widow; and her husband, James Williams (son of Tom Williams, Gen. II, 18) whose first wife was a White woman.

House 3: Dohkish (Sorrel) (Gen. I, 20) related to Snow-chief family; and his second wife, Sakiansis; and, sometimes, his son, Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46).

House 4: Laury Dunlip; and his wife; and his wife’s mother. (Laury Dunlip is brother of Bob Dunlip, Gen. I, 5.)

House 5: Joe Weller; and his wife; and daughter.

Footnotes

   (↵ returns to text)

  1. Such houses are common, they are for storage of pumpkins, etc. They are not to be identified with the circular earth lodges formerly lived in.
  2. The description is realistic.
  3. Na, locative; ikut’, ocean, lake; t’si, diminutive
  4. The description is realistic.
  5. He had once been married to a Shawnee, Annie Pecan, and in 1893 they had attempted unsuccessfully to introduce the Caddo Ghost dance to the Shawnee (Voegelin).
  6. See Mooney, where she is mentioned as a Ghost dance singer.
  7. ocalized family groups of which I have information are all in the northern division, to which White Moon belongs. He is less familiar with the family groupings in the southern division; he opines that in the southern division there is less concentration by family.

    Kuhaiyu

    Here there are four houses occupied by several descendants of Gen. I, 1 and 2, White Moon’s paternal grandparents.

    House 1: Enoch Hoag (Gen. I, 7), chief; and his wife, a Delaware; and their daughter and son-in-law. (Their son lives at Lookeba, his wife’s home.)

    House 2: Sam Houston (Gen. I, 24); and his wife, Bertha Deer, a Muskogee, and their daughter; and Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46), maternal cousin of Sam Houston.

    House 3: Seywit’ (Gen. I, 28); and her husband, Little-boy; and their son. (Visited by her sister, Little-girl and family; but Littlegirl lives at her husband’s settlement, Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

    House 4: Little-black-head (Gen. I, 44) and his wife, Elsie Hendricks (Gen. I, 45, probably the daughter of Gen. I, 21); and their child. (Visited by his mother, Mrs. Curly; but Mrs. Curly lives at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

    In this settlement there is a fifth house, now empty, but formerly occupied by cousins of Enoch Hoag. There is also an earth house, a square dugout, with peak roof of timber,[1] in which before he died lived Biskuachu, Sam Houston’s father’s parallel cousin.

    Comparison with the table, Genealogy I, shows that the settlement is composed of the descendants of two sisters and of two brothers, of whom one survives. A female cousin of theirs (Gen. I, 21) and her family used to live in this settlement.

    Kudadosa

    (“Hill surrounded by trees”)[2]

    This is the settlement of White Moon’s mother’s people, in which he grew up. The settlement consists of four houses, in which live the descendants of a sister and brother and of the brother’s wife’s sister or parallel cousin.

    House 1: Sho’sin (Gen. II, 6); and her husband, David Shemamy; and the children of a daughter deceased.

    House 2: Ch´’uu (Gen. II, 15); and her husband, Tom Williams (her two first husbands also lived here); and her deceased daughter’s son. (Her daughter and son-in-law lived here.) Before their marriage all the children of a deceased female cousin (Gen. II, 19) of Ch´’uu lived with her. Of these Seyhut’ (Gen. II, 45) and her husband and children visit Ch´’uu , but Seyhut’ now lives at Nahaine, her second husband’s home. With Ch´’uu  also lives Grasshopper (Gen. II, 5), an old man whose relationship is obscure. He went to live with Ch´’uu after his wife died. He had no children.

    House 3: Belongs to Chu”u°; it harbors Seyhut’ and her family en visite.

    House 4: Sachanatih (Gen. II, 14), widow of Ch´’uu  brother; and her children, a daughter and her husband and children, and three unmarried daughters. Her married son lives at Spring Creek, but with his family is often at his mother’s.

    NaDacGathaGaiyu’

    (at White-bread’s) or Nakahdi (at the chief’s) (one mile east of Kudadosa)

    Here are two houses in one of which live the widow of Chief White-bread, her daughter and son-in-law, Ralph Maro’; in the other of which live the old lady’s daughter’s daughter, Cho’otan’ or Grace Aiken and her husband, Gunchaiyo (Whitehead) or Paul Frank.

    Nahaine

    (Near Minco)

    Here some of the Haine-speaking people had lived; but they moved away; the only survivor is Cry-baby or Ross Maro’ (Gen. II, 47), brother of Ralph Marc’ who lives with his wife at Chief White-bread’s.

    House 1: Ross Maro’; and his wife Seyhut’; and their children; and Maro”s father, “when he is at home,” not on the move trailing gaming parties and death feasts. The maternal aunt as well as the mother of the Maro’ brothers had lived here.

    House 2: Levi Frank (Nehaihi, Levi) and his wife.

    House 3: Chonest’iti, Sam Black, who lives alone. As far as known he was never married.

    Naikutsi[3]

    or Spring Creek

    The localized family groups of which I have information are all in the northern division, to which White Moon belongs. He is less familiar with the family groupings in the southern division; he opines that in the southern division there is less concentration by family.

    Kuhaiyu

    Here there are four houses occupied by several descendants of Gen. I, 1 and 2, White Moon’s paternal grandparents.

    House 1: Enoch Hoag (Gen. I, 7), chief; and his wife, a Delaware; and their daughter and son-in-law. (Their son lives at Lookeba, his wife’s home.)

    House 2: Sam Houston (Gen. I, 24); and his wife, Bertha Deer, a Muskogee, and their daughter; and Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46), maternal cousin of Sam Houston.

    House 3: Seywit’ (Gen. I, 28); and her husband, Little-boy; and their son. (Visited by her sister, Little-girl and family; but Littlegirl lives at her husband’s settlement, Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

    House 4: Little-black-head (Gen. I, 44) and his wife, Elsie Hendricks (Gen. I, 45, probably the daughter of Gen. I, 21); and their child. (Visited by his mother, Mrs. Curly; but Mrs. Curly lives at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s.)

    In this settlement there is a fifth house, now empty, but formerly occupied by cousins of Enoch Hoag. There is also an earth house, a square dugout, with peak roof of timber,1 in which before he died lived Biskuachu, Sam Houston’s father’s parallel cousin.

    Comparison with the table, Genealogy I, shows that the settlement is composed of the descendants of two sisters and of two brothers, of whom one survives. A female cousin of theirs (Gen. I, 21) and her family used to live in this settlement.

    Kudadosa

    (“Hill surrounded by trees”)[4]

    This is the settlement of White Moon’s mother’s people, in which he grew up. The settlement consists of four houses, in which live the descendants of a sister and brother and of the brother’s wife’s sister or parallel cousin.

    House 1: Sho’sin (Gen. II, 6); and her husband, David Shemamy; and the children of a daughter deceased.

    House 2: Lottie Pardon (Gen. II, 43) daughter of Minnie; and her husband Tila.

    House 3: Helen Pardon, daughter of Minnie; and her husband, Thompson Williams; and Charlie Williams, younger brother of Thompson Williams. (Cousins, Nettie Pardon (Gen. I, 37) and Mrs. Sam Binger (Gen. II, 41) grew up here.)

    House 4: Mother of Thompson and Charlie Williams; and her husband Ba’tshush (Tail-cut-off) or K’akitsaiyet’ (Chewed-up) or Benjamin Franklin.

    House 5: Kaiyot’iti and his wife.

    House 6: Sadie, the daughter of Kaiyot’iti’s wife; and her husband Frank Sargent (Gen. I, 19).

    House 7: Johnson Coffee; and his wife who is the sister of Frank Sargent.

    House 8: Little-girl, daughter of Kaiyot’iti and his wife; and her husband Chanatih (Gen. II, 30) and child.

    House 9: Little-old-woman (Gen. II, 32), sister of Chanatih; and her husband, Little-brave; and two sons, Roy and Bill-when they are not at Kudadosa.

    House 10: George Shiyatsi (Youth), related to Little-brave and his father, Hadunko (Shorty).

    House 11: Simona who is maternal uncle to George Shiyatsi; and his wife.

    Naigaswit’iti

    Boggy Creek

    Here in separate houses live or lived three sisters, whose mother, Sadipa, Mrs. Long, lived here. The sisters are Sawashish, Mrs. Osage, wife of Washish, Osage, who is, however, a Caddo; Mrs. Mike Williams; Sabinsin, mother of Vincent Johnson and Anna Johnson. Sabinsin has moved away, to Mrs. Peach Orchard’s where she lives with her second husband, Tsa’bata, Mr. Fish or Charlie Adams (Gen. II, 22). Here also lived White-bead, the mother of four men who still live here. White-bead herself has moved away. The four men are Stanley (Washish) and Jerome Age and Frank and Joe White-bead.

    House 1: Sawashish; and her husband Washish or Stanley Age.

    House 2: Mrs. Mike Williams; and her husband, Mike Williams.

    House 3: Jerome Age, brother of Stanley Age; and his wife.

    House 4: T’ahsisi or Frank White-bead; and his wife, Lyda Penn.

    House 5: Joe White-bead, brother of Frank White-bead; and his wife.

    House 6: Hadoshkatsi, Stiff (commonly translated Mr. Strong-man). He is a kinsman of Sadipa and of White-bead. Inferably Sadipa and White-bead are related. Stiff is a widower, living alone.

    House 7: His daughter, Bessie Wolf, and her husband, a White man.

    House 8: Gantino, Red-head, or Patrick Miller, related to Stiff and to Sadipa and his wife, a White woman.

    Nasakaas

    at Mrs. Peach Orchard’s[5]

    Here lives, excepting one household, a single family connection, the Shemamys who are Muskogee.

    House l: Sakaas, Mrs. Peach Orchard, widow of Tom Shemamy.

    House 2: Daughter of Mrs. Peach Orchard; and her husband, Tsa’wetsita (Mr. Wichita, he is a Wichita); and their children.

    House 3: John Shemamy or Tsa’owisha, brother of Tom Shemamy; and his wife, Saowisha; and their son, James Shemamy or Dwi’sha and daughter-in-law, Little-girl (Gen. I, 26).

    House 4: Sister of John and Tom Shemamy (also David Shemamy, see Gen. II, 7) and her widowed daughter, Mrs. Curly or Margaret Deer (Gen. I, 14).

    House 5: Sam Binger (Binka) (Gen. II, 40) who is a connection through marriage of the Shemamys; and his wife.

    House 6: Tsa’bata, Mr. Fish or Charlie Adams (Gen. II, 22); and his wife, Sabinsin.

    (Northeast of White-bread’s)

    This is the home of two sisters, Spibook.

    House 1: Spibook; and her husband, Bob Dunlip (Gen. I, 5).[6]

    House 2: Nyuda{{7}} (Spibook); and her husband, Charlie Pardon.

    Another sister who lived here died. (James Spibook, their brother, has also died. He was the first husband of Helen Pardon, sister of Charlie Pardon. See Spring Creek.)

    K’ok’anina

    (Water-lying lake) (South of Binger)

    House 1: Widow of Hina’kahdi (Snow-chief); and a daughter, who is separated from her husband.

    House 2: Oldest daughter of a daughter of Snow-chief’s widow; and her husband, James Williams (son of Tom Williams, Gen. II, 18) whose first wife was a White woman.

    House 3: Dohkish (Sorrel) (Gen. I, 20) related to Snow-chief family; and his second wife, Sakiansis; and, sometimes, his son, Leg-shaker (Gen. I, 46).

    House 4: Laury Dunlip; and his wife; and his wife’s mother. (Laury Dunlip is brother of Bob Dunlip, Gen. I, 5.)

    House 5: Joe Weller; and his wife; and daughter.



MLA Source Citation:

Parsons, Elsie Clews. Notes on the Caddo, Memories of the American Anthropological Association. Supplement to American Anthropologist, Volume 43, No. 3, Part 2. 1921. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 28 July 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/northern-division-family-groups.htm - Last updated on May 7th, 2013


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