Koyukon Indians

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Koyukon Indians. A contraction of Koyukukhotana, “people of Koyukuk River.”

Koyukon Connections. The Koyukon belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock.

Koyukon Location. On the drainage of the Yukon River south of the mouth of the Tanana to about latitude 63° N., including the drainage of the Innoko River north of the latitude named, and of the Koyukuk in west central Alaska.

Koyukon Subdivisions

  • Kaiyuhkhotana, on Yukon River between the Anvik and Koyukuk, including the drainage of Innoko River north of latitude 63° N.
  • Koyukukhotana, the drainage of the Koyukuk River.
  • Yukonikhotana, the drainage of Yukon River south of the mouth of the Tanana to the mouth of the Koyukuk.

Koyukon Villages

(1) Kaiyuhkhotana villages:

  • Anilukhtakpak, on Innoko River.
  • Chinik, or, the east bank of Yukon River at the junction with the Tallbisok.
  • Iktigelik, un Unalaklik River.
  • Innoka, on Tlegon River.
  • Ivan, on the divide between Unalaklik and Yukon Rivers.
  • Kagogagat, on the north bank of Yukon River at the mouth of Medicine Creek.
  • Kaiakak, on the west bank of Yukon River.
  • Kaltag, on the left bank of Yukon River.
  • Khogoltlinde, on Yukon River.
  • Khulikakat, on Yukon River.
  • Klamaskwaltin, on the north bank of Yukon River near the mouth of Kaiyuh River.
  • Kunkhogliak, on Yukon River.
  • Kutul, on Yukon River 50 miles above Anvik.
  • Lofka, on the west bank of Yukon River.
  • Nulato, on the north bank of Yukon River about 100 miles from Norton Sound.
  • Taguta, on the north bank of Yukon River 15 miles below the mouth of the Kaiyuh.
  • Takaiak, east of Yukon River near Nulato.
  • Talitui, on Tlegon River.
  • Tanakot, on the right bank of Yukon River near the mouth of Melozi River.
  • Terentief, on the Yukon below Koyukuk River.
  • Tutago, on Yukon River at the mouth of Auto River.
  • Wolasatux, on the east bank of Yukon River on a small stream north of Kaiyuh River.

(2) Koyukukhotana villages:

  • Batza, on Batza River.
  • Bolshoigor, on Yukon River 25 miles above the mouth of Koyukuk River.
  • Dotle, on Koyukuk River.
  • Hussliakatna, on the right bank of Koyukuk River, 2 miles above the south end of Dall Island.
  • Kakliaklia, on Koyukuk River at the mouth of Ssukloseanti River.
  • Kaltat, on an island in Yukon River not far from its junction with Koyukuk River.
  • Kanuti, on Koyukuk River in latitude 66°18′ N.
  • Kautas, on Koyukuk River.
  • Kotil, at the junction of Kateel River with Koyukuk River.
  • Koyukuk, near the junction of Koyukuk and Yukon Rivers.
  • Mentokakat, on the left bank of Yukon River 20 miles above the mouth of Melozi River.
  • Nohulchinta, on the South Fork of Koyukuk River 3 miles above the junction.
  • Nok, on the west bank of Koyukuk River near its mouth.
  • Notaloten, on Yukon River 20 miles above the mouth of Koyukuk River.
  • Oonigachtkhokh, on Koyukuk River.
  • Soonkakat, on the left bank of the Yukon River below Nulato.
  • Tashoshgon, on Koyukuk River.
  • Tlialil, on Koyukuk River.
  • Tok, on an island at the junction of Koyukuk River with the Yukon.
  • Zakatlatan, on the north bank of Yukon River, in longitude 156°30′ W.
  • Zogliakten, on the east bank of Koyukuk River.
  • Zonagogliakten, on the east bank of Koyukuk River.

(3) Yukonikhotana villages:

  • Chentansitzan, on the north bank of Yukon River 30 miles below the mouth of Melozi River.
  • Medvednaia, on the south side of Yukon River.
  • Melozikakat, on Melozikakat River.
  • Noggai, on Yukon River.
  • Nowi, on the south side of Yukon River at the mouth of Nowikakat River_.
  • Tohnokalong, on the north bank of Yukon River in longitude 154°25′ W.
  • Tuklukyet, on the north bank of Yukon River 15 miles below the mouth of the Tozi River.

Koyukon History. Russian influences began to penetrate the country of the Koyukon after the establishment of the Russian settlement of before any settlements had been made on the Kuskokwim or Yukon. In 1838 the most important Russian settlement on the lower Yukon was made at Nulato, and this was the center of one of the very native uprisings. The post was attacked by neighboring Indians in 1851 and most of the inmates butchered. With American ownership in 1867 the influences of civilization began to increase, and the current was swollen still further by the discovery of gold, though this was hardly to the advantage of the aborigines. (See Ahtena,.)

Koyukon Population. Mooney (1928) estimated that there were 1,500 Koyukon in the year 1740. In 1890, 940 were returned.




MLA Source Citation:

Swanton, John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 145. Washington DC: US Government Printing Office. 1953. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 25 April 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/koyukon-indians.htm - Last updated on Aug 11th, 2012


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