- Access Genealogy - http://www.accessgenealogy.com -

Kashehotapalo

Posted By Dennis On In Louisiana,Native American | No Comments

Kashehotapalo[[1]] is neither man nor beast. His head is small and his face shriveled and evil to look upon; his body is that of a man. His legs and feet are those of a deer, the former being covered with hair and the latter having cloven hoofs. He lives in low, swampy places, away from the habitations of men. When hunters go near his abiding place, he quietly slips up behind them and calls loudly, then turns and runs swiftly away. He never attempts to harm the hunters, but delights in frightening them. The sound uttered by Kashehotapalo resembles the cry of a woman, and that is the reason for his name (kashcho, “woman;” tapalo, “call”).

[[1]]This myth was told by Ahojeobe at Bayou Lacomb in March, 1909, and he assured the writer that only a few days before one of the boys, while hunting in a swamp not far from the bayou, had been frightened by Kashehotapalo, whom he saw distinctly, and that he immediately ran home and related his experience. The great similarity between the subject of this myth and the Faun of Latin mythology at first glance would lead one to suspect that the conception had been acquired by the Choctaw after their contact with Europeans. But such does not appear to have been its origin with the tribe. So firmly convinced are they that such a spirit exists that it is probable the tradition has been handed down through many generations. [[1]]


Article printed from Access Genealogy: http://www.accessgenealogy.com

URL to article: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/kashehotapalo.htm

Copyright © 2013 Access Genealogy (http://www.accessgenealogy.com/). All rights reserved.