Julia Thompson Dawes Consolidated Cases

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The record in the above consolidated case shows that there were, originally, thirteen applications made separately, by the parties named, at the times and places herein set forth, to wit:

In the matter of the application of Julia Thompson, for the identification of herself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 17, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Candis Allen for the identification of herself and her eight minor children, John, Minnie, Ella, Della, Pearl, Byrd, Aleck and Farly Allen as Mississippi Choctaws, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 11, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Banistor Allen for the identification of himself and his four minor children, Lewis, Annie, Cora and Luther Allen, as Mississippi Choctaws, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 11, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Indiana Coleman for the identification of herself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 11, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Margaret Ferrill, for the identification of herself and her three minor children, Ella, Lemuel, and Charley Ferrill, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 12, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Emma Hayes for the identification of herself and her six minor children, Minnie, Bamar, Ollie, Maggie, Lucy and Cicero Hayes, as Mississippi Choctaws taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 12, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Jack Ferrill for the identification of himself and his two minor children Mary Ella and George Ferrill, as Mississippi Choctaws, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 12, 1901.

In the matter of the application of John Ferrill for the identification of himself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 12, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Willoughby Thompson for the identification of himself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 18, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Tobias Brock for the identification of himself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 18, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Julia Turner for the identification of herself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 23, 1901.

In the matter of the application of Charlie Allen for the identification of himself as a Mississippi Choctaw, taken at Meridian, Mississippi, April 30, 1901.

While these several applications have been consolidated, and are to be considered together as a whole, yet in view of the varied proceedings had in each, it will be necessary to consider them in a measure, separately.

Taking them in the order above named, we find from the record in the   application of Julia Thompson that on April 17, 1901, the said Julia Thompson appeared before the Commission at Meridian, Mississippi, and there made personal application for the identification of herself as a Mississippi Choctaw, claiming to be a descendant of Choctaw Indians who resided in the state of Mississippi in 1830 and took advantage of the provisions of article fourteen of the treaty made between the United States government and the Choctaw tribe of Indians concluded September 27, 1830, and known as the treaty of “Dancing Rabbit Creek.”  She claims descent from Willoughby Trotter, an alleged one half blood Choctaw, who married Ann Trotter, a Negro woman, and who are the parents of this applicant.

The record in this case further shows that the applicant Julia Thompson has never been enrolled by the tribal authorities of the Choctaw Nation as a citizen of that tribe, nor is her name found upon any of the tribal rolls of the Choctaw Nation in the possession of the Commission, nor has she ever been admitted to Choctaw citizenship by a duly constituted court or committee of the Choctaw Nation, or by the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, or by a decree of the United States Court in Indian Territory under the provisions of the act of Congress of June 10, 1896.  (29 states. 321)

The evidence offered in support of this application, aside form the oral statement of the applicant, embraces the joint ex parte affidavit of Wash Ferrill and Cato Evans.  By the oral statement of the applicant, it is attempted to be shown that she was born in the state of Alabama in about the year 1827, and that she has resided all her life in the states of Alabama and Mississippi, and claims to be a one-quarter blood Choctaw.  She attempts to trade her alleged Choctaw descent form her father Willoughby Trotter, to her grandfather, Sam Trotter, who she alleges, was a full blood Choctaw Indian.  There is nothing in her statement which tends to show that any of her alleged Choctaw ancestors were recognized members of the Choctaw tribe of Indians in Mississippi and complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article fourteen of the treaty of 1830.  By the joint ex parte affidavit filed herewith it is attempted to be shown that affiants are acquainted with the applicant, Julia Thompson, who they allege, is a one quarter blood Choctaw and derives her Choctaw blood from her father, Willoughby Trotter, an alleged half blood Choctaw who was the son of “Gilbert Indian”, who they allege, was a full blood Choctaw.  From said affidavit it also appears that the applicant was married to Berry Thompson, a Negro, in the year 1854 and by said union there was born one Willoughby Thompson.  There is nothing in the affidavit filed herewith which tends to show that the applicant or any of her alleged Choctaw ancestors were ever recognized by the Choctaw tribal authorities as members of the Choctaw tribe of Indians in Mississippi, or that they complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article fourteen of the treaty of 1830, in fact, affiants state positively that they know that neither the applicant, her ancestors or descendants have ever received any benefits under the provisions of the treaty of “Dancing Rabbit Creek.”

 



MLA Source Citation:

AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 27 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/julia-thompson-dawes-consolidated-cases.htm - Last updated on Mar 22nd, 2013


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