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Hupa Indians

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In California,Native American | No Comments

Hupa Indians. Derived from the Yurok name of the valley, Hupo. Also called:

  • Cha’parahihu, Shasta name.
  • Hich’hu, Chimariko name.
  • Kishakevira, Karok name.
  • Nabiltse, given by Gibbs (1877) and translated “man.”
  • Natinnoh-hoi, own name, after Natinnoh, “Trinity River.”
  • Num-ee-muss, Yurok name.
  • Trinity Indians, translation of their own name.

Hupa Connections. The Hupa belonged to the Athapascan linguistic stock, forming one closely knit linguistic group with the Chilula and Whilkut.

Hupa Location. On the middle course of the Trinity River and its branches, particularly a beautiful stretch of 8 miles known as Hupa (or Hoopa) Valley, and on New River. C. H. Merriam (1926) treats these latter as a distinct tribe of Shastan affinities, but J. P. Harrington (personal information) states that they were Hupa.

Hupa Villages

  • Aheltah, name perhaps Yurok; said to be in the upper part of Hupa territory.
  • Cheindekotding, on the west bank of Trinity River between Kinchuhwikut and Miskut.
  • Dakis-hankut, on the west bank of Trinity River between Honsading and Kinchuhwikut.
  • Djishtangading, on the east bank of Trinity River between Howunkut and Haslinding.
  • Haslinding, in the “Sugar Bowl” above Hupa Valley.
  • Honsading, the village farthest down Trinity River and on the east bank.
  • Howunkut, on the west side of Trinity River between Medilding and Djishtangading.
  • Kachwunding, on Trinity River near the mouth of Willow Creek.
  • ‘Kek-kah’-na-tung, at Martha Ziegler’s place on the lower part of New River.
  • Kinchuhwikut, on the east bank of Trinity River between Dakishankut and
  • Cheindekotding.
  • Ki-ooch-wet-tung, at Sally Noble’s place on New River, about a quarter of a mile below the mouth of Panther Creek.
  • Klo-ne6-tung, at the present site of Quinby on New River.
  • Medilding, on the east bank of Trinity River between Totltsasding and Howunkut.
  • Me-yemma, possibly belonging to this tribe, but more likely Chimariko, on Trinity River just below the mouth of New River.
  • Mingkutme, on Trinity River near the mouth of Willow Creek.
  • Miskut, on the east bank of Trinity River between Cheindekotding and Takimitlding.
  • Sehachpaya, the name perhaps Yurok; said to have been in the upper part of the Hupa territory.
  • Sokeakeit, ibid.
  • Takimitlding, on the east bank of Trinity River between Miskut and Tsewenaiding.
  • Tashuanta, the name perhaps Yurok; said to have been in the upper part of the Hupa territory.
  • Tlelding, at the forks of the Trinity River.
  • Tl’okame, a subsidiary settlement of the preceding, 5 miles up the South Fork of Trinity River.
  • Totltsasding, on the west bank of Trinity River between the preceding and Medilding.
  • Tsa-nah’-ping-ah’-tung, on the bar or flat at New River Forks, at the junction of East Fork with maip New River.
  • Tsewenalding, on the east bank of Trinity River between Takimitlding and Totltsasding.
  • Waugullewatl, the name perhaps Yurok; said to have been in the upper part of the Hupa territory.

Hupa Population. Kroeber (1925) places the number of Hupa at 1,000 in 1770; the census of 1910 returned 500. In 1937 the United States Office of Indian Affairs returned 575. (See Bear River Indians.)

 

Connection in which the Hupa have become noted. A village in Humboldt County, preserves the name of the Hupa.

 


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