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H Arizona Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Arizona,Native American | No Comments

A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Harsanykuk (Hársanykük, ‘saguaro cactus standing’). A Pima village at Sacaton Flats, s. Ariz. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 18, 1902.

Hermho (Herm′-ho, ‘once’). A Pima village on the N. side of Salt r., 3 m. from Mesa, Maricopa co., s. Ariz. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 1902.

Hiatam (Hi′-a-tam, ‘sea-sand place’, from Híakatcĭk). A Pima village N. of Maricopa station on the S. P. K. R., s. Ariz. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 18, 1902.

Hinama (Hi′nǎmâ, referring to the head of a variety of fish). A former Maricopa village whose people now live on the s. bank of Salt r., E. of the Mormon settlement of Lehi, Maricopa co., s. Ariz. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 16, 1902.

Homolobi (Hō-mōl′-ōbi, ‘place of the breast-like elevation’). A group of ruined pueblos near Winslow, Ariz., which were occupied by the ancestors of various Hopi clans. See Fewkes in 22d Rep. B. A. E., 23, et seq., 1904; Mindeleff in 8th Rep. B. A. E., 29, 1891.

Honanki (Hopi: ‘bear house’). A pre historic cliff-village, attributed to the Hopi, in the valley of Oak cr., in the “red-rock” country s. of Flagstaff, Ariz. Fewkes in 17th Rep. B. A. E., 558-569, 1898.

Hormiguero (Span.: ant hill). A village, probably of the Pima, on the Pima and Maricopa res., Gila r., Ariz.; pop. 510 in 1860, 514 in 1869.

Huchiltchik (Hü′tcĭlttcĭk, round clearing). A Pima village below Santa Ana, on the N. bank of the Gila, in s. Arizona.

Hueso Parado (Span.: ‘bone set up’ or ‘standing bone’). A former Pima and Maricopa village on the Pima and Maricopa res., Gila r., Ariz.; pop. 263 Pima and 314 Maricopa in 1858.

Hushkovi. A traditionary village about 2 m. N. w. of Oraibi, N. E. Ariz. According to Hopi story Hushkovi and Pivanhonkapi were destroyed by a fire that had been kindled in the San Francisco mts., 90 m. away, at the instance of the chief of Pivanhonkapi and with the aid of the Yayaponchatu people who are said to have been in league with supernatural forces, because the inhabitants of Pivanhonkapi had become degenerates through gambling. Most of the inhabitants were also destroyed; the survivors moved away, occupying several temporary villages during their wanderings, the ruins of which are still to be seen. See Voth, Traditions of the Hopi, 241, 1905.


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