Condition of Tribes by State in 1890

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Condition of the Arkansas Indians in 1890

Total                    250

Indians in prisons, not otherwise enumerated        32

Self-supporting Indians, Taxed                            218

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Arkansas number 218, 146 males and 72 females, and are distributed as follows: Pulaski County, 47; Sebastian County, 47; other counties with 11 or less in each, 124.

The Indians of Arkansas are mostly in a county bordering on the Indian Territory, and in the county containing the state capital.  There are not enough to form a distinctive class.

Condition of the Connecticut Indians in 1890

The civilized, (self-supporting) Indians of Connecticut, counted in the general census, number 228, 107 males and 121 females, and are distributed as follows: Fairfield County, 31; New Haven County, 25; New London County, 105; Windham County, 32; other counties with 17 or less in each, 35.

These Indians are mainly fishermen and laborers; some of them indistinguishable in appearance from other people of like employments.

Condition of the Delaware Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Delaware, counted in the, general census, number 4, 3 males and 1 female, and are distributed as follows: Kent County, 1; Newcastle County, 3.

Condition of the District of Columbia Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of the District of Columbia counted in the general census number 25, 13 males and 12 females.

These are Indians educated like whites, including college graduates, and some of them ate employed in the government departments.

Condition of the Florida Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Florida, counted in the general census, number 171, 97 males and 74 females, and are distributed as follows: Brevard county, 23; Dade county, 134; other counties with 3 or less in each, 14.

There is a small remnant of the Seminoles, mainly in the swamp regions of Dade County, among whom are counted some persons of more or less Negro blood. The Indians live by hunting, fishing, and the cultivation of semitropical vegetables.

The difficulties of penetrating the swamps where they live keep up a great mystery as to these Indians and lend some persons to estimate their number as vastly greater than call be authenticated by any substantial authority.

Condition of the Georgia Indians in 1890

The, civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Georgia, counted in the general census, number 68, 36 males and 32 females, and are distributed as follows: Ware County, 14; other counties with 6 or less in each, 154.

The Indians of Georgia are principally of Cherokee descent, The number of persons with some remote trace of Indian blood, but usually known only as whites, is probably much larger than the number recognized in the census. It is to be remembered that these claims of remote Indian ancestry produce discussions and disputes which no enumerator can settle.

Condition of the Illinois Indians in 1890

Population As Of June 1, 1890.

Total 98

Indian in prison not otherwise enumerated 1
Indians self-supporting and taxed (counted in the general census) 97

The self-supporting Indians of Illinois number 97, 46 males and 51 females, and are distributed as follows: in Cook County, 20; other counties, 11 or less in each, 77.

Condition of the Indiana Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Indiana, counted in the general census, number 343, 163 males and 180 females, and are distributed as follows: Allen County, 26; Grant County, 48; Miami County, 97; Wabash County, 94; other counties, 10 or less in each, 78.

Of the people counted as Indians there are probably more descendants of the Miamis than of any other tribe. There is a school for Indians at Wabash with an average attendance of about 75, and a school at Rensselaer with an average attendance of about 40.

Condition of the Kentucky Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Kentucky, counted in the general census, number 71 (41 males and 30 females), and are distributed as follows:
Floyd County, 14; Jefferson County, 14; other counties (10 or less in each), 43.

Condition of the Louisiana Indians in 1890

Indian Population as of June 1, 1890

Total 628
Indian in prisons, not otherwise enumerated 1
Indians off reservations, self-supporting and taxed. (counted in the general census) 627

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Louisiana, counted in the general census, number 627 (335 males and 292 females), and are distributed as follows:

Avoyelles Parish, 47; Calcasieu Parish, 148; Catahoula, Parish, 34; Orleans Parish, 21; St. Landry Parish, 120; St. Mary Parish, 32; St. Tammany Parish, 60; Terrebonne Parish, 55; other parishes (14 or less in each), 110.

In Louisiana are a few descendants of Caddos, Alabamas, Biloxis and others, mostly of various degrees of mixed blood.

Condition of the Maryland Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Maryland, counted in the general census, number 44 (9 males and 35 females), and are distributed as follows:

Cecil County, 23; other counties (10 or less in each), 21.

Condition of the Massachusetts Indians in 1890

Indian Population as of June 1, 1890

Total 428
Indians in prisons not otherwise enumerated 4
Indians off reservations, self-supporting and taxed (counted in the general census) 424

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Massachusetts, counted in the general census, number 424 (222 males and 202 females), and are distributed as follows:

Barnstable County, 146; Dukes County, 133; Middlesex, County 19; Plymouth County, 27; Suffolk County, 29; Worcester County, 21; other counties (13 or less in each), 49.

The Indians of southern New England are mainly descendants of the tribes that inhabited the region when the white people came, and some of them inherit legal claims by reason of Indian blood; but to the casual observer there is often little in their appearance to distinguish them from hunters and fishers of the neighboring population, toward whom they have been assimilating in blood and in habits.

Descendants of the Wampanoag Indians, as many consider them, form a quiet community at Gay Head, on the western part of the island of Marthas Vineyard. They are sailors and fishermen with their white neighbors. A few Negroes and some Portuguese have been absorbed in the community. The use of Indian words even has almost disappeared, English being used by all.

On the mainland, in Barnstable County, are those of similar tribal ancestry, sometimes known as Mashpee Indians. Occasionally one of these Indians has been elected to the state legislature.

Condition of the Missouri Indians in 1890

Indian Population as of June 1, 1800.
Total 128
Indian in prison, not otherwise enumerated 1
Indians, self-supporting and taxed (counted in the general census) 127

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Missouri, counted in the general census, number 197 (69 males and 58 females), and are distributed as follows:

Jasper County, 13; McDonald County, 10; Newton County, 10; St. Louis city, 31; other counties (8 or less in each,) 63.

A few Indians are living like whites in the counties adjacent to Indian Territory, and a few are in miscellaneous, occupations in the city of St. Louis.

Condition of the New Hampshire Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of New Hampshire, counted in the general census, number 16 (13 males and 3 females), and are distributed as follows:

Coos County, 7; other counties (5 or less in each), 9.

Condition of the New Jersey Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of New Jersey, counted in the general census, number 84 (47 males and 37 females), and are distributed as follows:

Burlington County, 15; Mercer County, 19; Monmouth County, 18; other counties (7 or less in each), 32.

Condition of the Ohio Indians in 1890

Indian Population as June 1, 1890

Total 206

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Ohio, counted in the general census, number 193 (119 males and 74 females), and are distributed as follows:

Franklin County, 14; Hamilton County, 14; Highland County, 22; Paulding county, 18; Washington County, 18; other counties (9 or less in each), 107.

Condition of the Oklahoma Indians in 1890

Condition of the Pennsylvania Indians in 1890

Indian Population As Of June 1, 1890.
Total 1,081

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Pennsylvania, counted in the general census, number 083 (590 males and 393 females), and arc distributed as follows:
Bucks County, 166; Chester County, 30; Cumberland County, 370; Delaware County, 13; McKean County, 44; Montgomery County, 17; Philadelphia County, 258; other counties (10 or less in each), 85.

There are 11 Onondagas and 87 Senecas on the Cornplanter reservation, Warren County, adjacent to Allegany, Seneca reservation, New York. The conditions of the Indians are similar to those of the Six Nations of New York, with whom they belong. Some particulars regarding them will be found in the discussion of the Six Nations under New York.

The Indian training school at Carlisle is an outgrowth, in a measure, of the Hampton institute at Hampton, Virginia, where Negroes and Indians have been educated together.

The Carlisle training school has become the largest of all schools of its kind; if in fact there are others organized so closely on its pattern as to be comparable with it. Various industries are taught to those of both sexes brought from their tribal homes. The enrollment in 1890 was given as 789. There is also Lincoln institution in Philadelphia, reporting an enrollment of 216. These Indians are in part counted with the reservations, which are considered as their homes.

Condition of the Rhode Island Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Rhode Island, counted in the general census, number 180 (96 males and 84 females), and are distributed as follows:

Newport County, 9; Providence County, 60; Washington County, 111.

The Indians on Block Island, Rhode Island, are a remnant of the Narragansetts, as are some of those in the rest of the state.  They have intermarried with the whites, some of them with Negroes.  They till the soil and engage in ordinary labor.  Since their first contact with the whites the life of these people has been in the main as uneventful as that of the other Indians of the New England coast and the adjacent Long Island; they have a history that is not without interest and connection with the settlement of the island by the white people who colonized Rhode Islend.

Condition of the South Carolina Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of South Carolina, counted in the general census, number 173 (82 males and 91 females), and are distributed as follows:

Charleston County. 47; Colleton County, 15; Marion County, 21; York County, 61; Other counties (7 or less in each), 29.

Condition of the West Virginia Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of West Virginia, counted in the general census, number 9 (6 males and 3 females), and are distributed as follows:

Berkeley County, 1; Lewis County, 7; Nicholas County, 1.




MLA Source Citation:

Department of the Interior. Report on Indians Taxed and Indians not Taxed in the United States, Except Alaska at the Eleventh Census: 1890. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1894. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 14 April 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/condition-of-tribes-by-state-in-1890.htm - Last updated on Jun 25th, 2013

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