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Chimariko Tribe

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In California,Native American | No Comments

Chimariko Indians (from Djimaliko, the name they apply to themselves; derived from (djimar ‘man’). A small tribe, comprising the Chimarikan family, formerly on Trinity River, near the mouth of New River, Northern California, extending from Hawkins Bar to about Big Bar, and probably along lower New River; they adjoined the Hupa downstream and the Wintun upstream. The Chimariko first became known to the whites on the influx of miners about 1850. They were then a small tribe, friendly with the Hupa and the neighboring Shastan tribes, but at war with the Wintun of Hay fork of Trinity River. In 1903 they numbered only 9 individuals, including ‘mixed bloods, who lived scattered from Hupa up Trinity River, and on New River, among Indians of other tribes, and among the whites1 In general culture the Chimariko were much like their neighbors to the north west, the Hupa, though they are said to have lacked canoes, and did not practice the deerskin dance of the Hupa and Yurok. They appear to have lived largely on salmon and eels caught, in Trinity River, and on vegetal foods, especially acorns. Like the other tribes of north west California, they had no political organization or divisions other than villages, one of which was at or near Hawkins Bar, others at Burnt Ranch, Taylor’s Flat, and Big Bar, and probably at other places, though their names for these settlements are not known with certainty.

Footnotes

  1. Goddard, MS., Univ. Cal. 


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