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Cherokee Advocate 1886

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Native American,Oklahoma | No Comments

 

February 15, 1886
Vinta, Indian Territory

Editor Advocate:

Dear Sir; Your Correspondents has not forgotten you if the weather has. We will try to be on time in the future provided the blizzards don’t interfere.

News at this place is not very plentiful, we might say there we have had very cold weather, but doubtless our neighbors are aware of that as well as ourselves.

Since our last items we have had intense cold and tremendous snow drifts.

Business is very dull owing to the scarcity of cash.

We give it up, that last snow beats us, nothing like it since we were born in this country.

Our open winter prophets have hunted their holes, now and then you see the hindest one’s tail sticking out. What do muskrats know about weather anyway?

The comparative pleasant weather, last Saturday, thawed out the country folks in a manner entirely satisfactory to merchants.

The sick people in town so far as heard from today are on the mend.

Hon. George W Scraper who has been very feeble this winter, has been very low for several days past; talking into consideration his advanced age, not much hope is entertained of his recovery.

During the severe weather, or big snow, our coal dealers were out of coal and several families of our village were in the same condition. The roads to the coal tanks were however, opened in time to supply our wants.

During the temporary snow blockade railroad travelers complimented our village very highly when they found that they could not get anything stronger to drink than tea or coffee.

Mr. J Lamar, our public school teacher has resigned and gone to preaching. S S Stephens is engaged to teach the school at present. Mr. Stephens will do a good work as he is competent and one of the best teachers in the Cherokee Nation today. Stand by him directors.

A good many able bodied tramps have been visitors in Vinita this winter but we believe they have fared poorly in securing provisions.

We are repeatedly forced to the conclusion that life is made up of sunshine and shadow- one day bright and sunny, just like Saturday and Sunday- but tomorrow spoils all of today’s plans.

The girls of Vinita wonder why so nice a fellow as George Butler, with those sparkling eyes and mustache of raven locks, can’t be captured by some fair lady. We heartily say, go girls, but be careful how you approach him- he may show resentment. R H F

Notice

To all whom it may concern; I, Aaron Terrell, Sheriff, in and for Tahlequah District, do hereby notify all non-citizens from cutting, hauling and selling timber from off the Public Domain of the Cherokee Nation. And if said non-citizens continue to cut timber off Public Domain contrary to my orders, I shall levy upon all timber so cut, for the benefit of the Nation, and seize all such non-citizens with all their wagons and teams for such offense, and turn them over to the U S Agent, to b prosecuted under the Intercourse Law.

This notice is given under an act of the National Council, restricting non-citizens from trespassing upon the Public Domain of the Cherokee Nation. Aaron Terrell, Sheriff.

Notice

Notice to all citizens of Cooweescoowee District who have permits for citizens of the United States to not allow them to hunt and kill game as it is strictly against the laws of the Cherokee Nation, as published in this paper in An Act entitled An Act to Prevent the Shipping of Game Beyond the Limits of the Cherokee Nation. Notice is also given to all non-citizens from cutting, hauling and selling timber from the Public Domain of the Cherokee Nation. And if said non-citizens continue to cut timber off the Public Domain contrary to my orders, I shall levy all timber so cut for the benefit of the Nation, and seize all such non-citizens with all their wagons and teams for such offense, and turn them over to the U s Agent to be prosecuted under the Intercourse Law. This notice is given under an Act of the National Council, restricting non-citizens from trespassing upon the Public Domain of the Cherokee Nation. W E Sanders, Sheriff, Cooweescoowee District.

Oak Items

Editor Advocate:

Dear Sir:- I enclose you the following items from our neighborhood.

Times are tolerably good but money scarce, cattle look well after the thirty inch snow has passed off.

A great many hogs lost their taw during that snow.

Oaks merchants use coon and deer hides for their money. A coon hide is good dollar for dollar.

J S Hunter is the most enterprising citizen in the neighborhood in the way of farming. He has done a great deal of improvements on his farm inside of one year. He is a good example for any neighborhood.

U S Marshals made a raid in our neighborhood a short time since, and captured Simon Dry and James Stover, for introducing whiskey and old George Miller for stealing corn from Duckworth and Israel. We were told by a little boy, that this same set of marshals robbed three houses before they caught Stover.

Wheat crops are looking well on Spring Creek this season.

Corn is holding very well. It is worth only 40 cts. Per bushel.

Every body in this section of country is expecting a per capita payment next spring, of that lease money. They say that there was an act passed some time back to that effect by the National Council.

A big fine boy at G W Mitchell’s. What have you named him George? Do you think the per capita payment is sure to come?

The Oaks School commences on the 15th of February. It’s teacher is Miss Nannie McNair. Our children are anxious for the day to come.

There has been ten deaths and five births on Spring Creek within the past year.

Hoping these few lines will find room in the peoples journal of the Cherokee Nation, the Advocate. I remain respectfully, Whippoorwill.


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