C- Mexican Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Caborca. A rancheria of the Soba division of the Papago and the seat of a mission established by Kino about 1687; situated on the s. bank of the Rio Asuncion, lat. 30º 30′, long. 112º, Sonora, Mexico. It had 4 subordinate villages in 1721 (Venegas, II, 177, 285, 1759) and a population of 223 in 1730, but it was totally destroyed in the Pima rebellion of 1751. It is now a white Mexican village. (F. W. H.)

Cacaria. A former Tepehuane pueblo on the upper waters of the Rio San Pedro, central Durango, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 319, 1864.

Caiman. A former Tepehuane pueblo in Jalisco, Mexico.

Camoa. A Mayo settlement on the Rio Mayo, 70 in. from the coast, in s. Sonora, Mexico.

Canatlan (kan-at-lan′) . A former Tepehuane pueblo on the upper waters of the Rio San Pedro, central Durango, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 819, 1864.

Carapoa  An ancient settlement, apparently of the Tehueco or the Cahita, situated near El Fuerte, which is on the E. bank of the Rio Fuerte, N. Sinaloa, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 332, 1864.

Carichic (garichic, where there are houses. Lumholtz). A former Tarahumare settlement E. of Rio Nonoava, the upper fork of Rio Conchos, lat. 27º 5′, long. 107º, about 72 m. s. of Chihuahua, Mexico. Although often visited by the Tarahumare, the place is now thoroughly Mexicanized. In the neighborhood are numerous Tarahumare burial caves. (A. H.)

Casa Blanca (Span.: white house). Formerly a summer village of the Laguna tribe, but now permanently inhabited; situated 4½ m. w. of Laguna pueblo, Valencia co., N. Mex.

Cerocahui. A settlement of the Temoris branch of the Guazapar in lat. 27º 25′, long. 108º 25 X′, w. Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 324, map, 1864.

Chalichiki A Tarahumare rancheria near Palanquo, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, inf’n, 1894.

Chamada. A former rancheria of the Jova division of the Opata, near the Sonora-Chihuahua boundary, about lat. 29º, Mexico. It appears to have been abandoned after 1690, the inhabitants finally moving to Sahuaripa. Doc. of 18th century quoted by Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Papers, iv, 511, 1892.

Charac. A Tehueco settlement on the Rio del Fuerte, about lat, 26º 15′, N. w. Sinaloa, Mexico. Hardy mentions it as a Mayo pueblo, which is improbable, although it may have contained some people of that tribe.

Charco Escondido (hidden pool). A locality about 9 leagues s. w. of Reynosa, between Matamoros and Victoria, in Tamaulipas, Mexico, one of the sections occupied by the Carrizo.

Chinapa. An Opata pueblo, and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1648, on the Rio Sonora, lat. 30º 30′, Sonora, Mexico; pop. 393 in 1678, and 204 in 1730. It was burned by the Apache in 1836.

Chinatu ( Chi-na-tu′, the hidden back of a mountain. Lumholtz). A pueblo, in habited by both Tepehuane and Tarahumare, in the Sierra Madre, w. Chihuahua, Mexico.

Chonacate. A Huichol settlement at the E. border of their territory, in the Sierra de los Huicholes, Jalisco, Mexico. Lumholtz, Unknown Mex., ii, 16, map, 1902.

Chueachiki (snouts). A Tarahumare rancheria in Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, inf’n, 1894.

Chugita (edge of a precipice). A Tarahumare rancheria of about 30 families, not far from Norogachic, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, inf’n, 1894.

Chuhuirari (Chu-hwi′-ra-ri, from a term meaning the dead ones). A rancheria, with a cave dwelling containing a single Tarahumare family, not far from Norogachic, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, inf’n, 1894.

Cienega. A large Cora rancheria in the Sierra de Nayarit, in the N. part of the territory of Tepic, Mexico.

Cinco Llagas (Span.: five wounds, referring to the wounds of Christ). A Tepehuane village near the Cerro de Muinora, in the Sierra Madre, on the head waters of the Rio del Fuerte, in the extreme s. w. part of Chihuahua, Mexico, the inhabitants of which are of pure blood, but speak Spanish. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., iv, 93, 1857; Lumholtz, Unknown Mexico, i, 429, 1902.

Cocomorachic. A Tarahumare settlement on the headwaters of the Rio Yaqui, lat. 28º 40′, long. 107º 40′, Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 323, 1864.

Cocori. A former Yaqui settlement s. E. of the lower Rio Yaqui, Sonora, Mexico, with an estimated population of 4,000 in 1849. It is now a white Mexican town, the only Yaqui living there being those employed as laborers. See Escudero, Not. Son. y Sin., 100, 1849; Velasco, Noticias de Sonora, 84, 1850.

Cocospera (place of the dogs) . A former Pima settlement on the headwaters of Rio San Ignacio, lat. 31º, Sonora, Mexico; pop. 74 in 1730, 133 in 1760. The Apache compelled the abandonment of the village in 1845. See Bartlett, Pers. Narr., i, 417, 1854; Bancroft, No. Mex. States, i,563, 1884.

Coguinachi. Given by Velasco (Bol. Soc. Mex. Geog. Estad., la s., x, 705, 1863) as one of the 4 divisions of the Opata, inhabiting principally the valley of the Rio Babispe, a tributary of the Yaqui, and adjacent small streams in E. Sonora, Mexico. Their villages, so far as known, were: Bacadeguachi, Guazavas, Matape (in part), Mochopa, Nacori, Oposura, Oputo, and Tonichi. As the division was based on neither linguistic nor ethnic characters, Coguinachi, Teguima, and Tegui were soon dropped as classificatory names.

Coloradas. A Tepehuane (?) village, apparently situated s. E. of Morelos, in the Sierra Madre, s. w. Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, Unknown Mexico, i, 439, 1902.

Comaquidam. A former Papago rancheria visited by Kino and Mange in 1701; situated in N. w. Sonora, Mexico, on the Rio Salado, 10 m. below Sonoita.

Comatlan. A former pueblo of the Colotlan division of the Cora and the seat of a mission; situated on the Rio Colotlan, lat. 21 50 , long. 104 10 , Jalisco, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 280, 1864.

Comecrudo (eaters of raw meat) . One of the few tribes of the Coahuiltecan family that have been identified. The surviving remnant was visited in 1886 by Gatschet, who found only 8 or 10 old per sons who could speak the dialect, living on the s. side of the Rio Grande, 2 of them at Las Prietas, Coahuila. Crozco y Berra (Geog., 293, map, 1864) placed them in Tamaulipas, Mexico, in the vicinity of the Tedexenos. They appear to have been known in later times as Carrizos, q. v.

Comopori. A warlike tribe of the Cahita group formerly inhabiting a peninsula 7 leagues from Ahome, N. w. Sinaloa, Mexico. They subsisted by fishing, and appear to have been related to the Vacoregue, speaking the same language. Orozco y Berra, Geog. , 58, 332, 1864.

Conicari (Nahuatl: coni ‘crow’, ‘raven’, cari house: ‘house of the raven’. Buelna). A settlement of the Mayo, probably of the Tepahue division, on the Rio Mayo, 30 m. N. of Alamos, in lat. 27º 6′, s. E. Sonora, Mexico. It contained 200 families in 1645, and is still one of the most important Mayo settlements. For discussion as to its linguistic relations see Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Papers, in, 53, 1890.

Contla. A branch of the Opata inhabiting the pueblo of” Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico (Orozco y Berra, Geog. , 344, 1864). The name is probably that applied by the natives to their town.

Corapa. A pueblo pertaining to the Cora division of the Piman stock and a visita of the mission of Nuestra Senora del Rosario. Probably situated on the Rio San Pedro, Jalisco , Mexico. S. Juan Corapa. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 280, 1864.

Corazones (Span.: hearts). A pueblo of the Opata, determined by Hodge (Coronado’s March, 35, 1899) to have been situated at or near the site of the present Ures, on the Rio Sonora, Sonora, Mexico. It was so named by Cabeza de Vaca in 1536 because the inhabitants presented to him more than 600 deer hearts. It was visited also by Coronado and his army in 1540, called by his chroniclers San Hieronimo de los Corazones, and described as being situated midway between Culiacan and Cibola (Zuñi). The houses were built of mats; the natives raised corn, beans, and melons, dressed in deerskins, and used poisoned arrows. (F. W. H.)

Corodeguachi. A former Opata pueblo on the headwaters of the Rio Sonora, N. E. Sonora, Mexico, about 25 m. below the boundary of Arizona. It was the seat of the Spanish mission of Santa Rosa, founded in 1653, and of the presidio of Fronteras, established in 1690. In 1689 the mission was abandoned on account of the hostilities of the Jocome, Suma, Jano, and Apache; and owing to Apache depredations in more recent years the settlement was deserted by its inhabitants on several occasions, once as late as about 1847. (F. W. H.)

Coyachic. A Tarahumare settlement N. of the headwaters of the central arm of the Rio San Pedro, lat. 28º 20′, long. 106º 48′, Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 323, 1864.

Cubo Guasibavia. A former rancheria, apparently Papago, visited by Kino and Mange in 1701; situated in a volcanic desert in N. w. Sonora, Mexico, between the Rio Salado and the Gulf of California, 2 m. from the shore.

Cuchuta. A former Opata pueblo and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1653; situated in N. E. Sonora, Mexico, near Fronteras; pop. 227 in 1678, 58 in 1730. It was abandoned on account of depredations by the Suma and Jano, war like Mexican tribes.

Cuchuveratzi (valley or torrent of the fish called matalote [the Gila trout]. Bandelier). A former Opata settlement a few miles N. E. of Fronteras, on the headwaters of the Rio Bavispe, in the N. E. corner of Sonora, Mexico. Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Papers, iv, 520, 1892.

Cucurpe. A Eudeve pueblo, containing also some Tegui Opata, and the seat of a Spanish mission subordinate to Arivechi, founded in 1647; situated on the headwaters of the Rio San Miguel de Horcasitas, the w. branch of the Rio Sonora, Mexico, about 25 m. s. E. of Magdalena. Pop. 329 in 1678, 179 in 1730. It is still inhabited by Opata. (F. W. H.)

Cuirimpo. A Mayo settlement on the Rio Mayo, between Navajoa and Echojoa, s. w. Sonora, Mexico.

Cujant. Apparently a former Papago rancheria in N. w. Sonora, Mexico, between the mouth of the Gila and the settlement of Sonoita in 1771. Coues, Garcés Diary, 37, 1900.

Cumpus. A Teguima Opata pueblo and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1644; situated on the Rio Soyopa (or Moctezuma), N. of Oposura, lat. 30º 20′, N. E. Sonora, Mexico. Pop. 887 in 1678, 146 in 1730.

Cumuripa. A Nevome pueblo and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1619; situated on the w. tributary of the Rio Yaqui, about 12 m. N. N. E. of Buena Vista, and about 20 in. N. of Cocori, in Sonora, Mexico; pop. 450 in 1678 and 165 in 1730, but the village contained only 4 families in 1849. It is now practically a white Mexican town. The inhabitants, also called Cumuripa, probably spoke a dialect slightly different from the Nevome proper. (F. W. H.

Cuquiarachi. A former pueblo of the Teguima Opata and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1653; situated about 6 m. southward from Fronteras, N. E. Sonora, Mexico. Pop. 380 in 1678; 76 in 1730. When visited by Bartlett in 1850 it was deserted, apparently on account of the Apache. (F. W. H.)

Curepo. A Chinipa rancheria in Chihuahua, Mexico, in 1601. Bancroft, No. Mex. States, i, 211, 1886.

Cusihuiriachic (where the upright pole is). A former Tarahumare settlement, now a white Mexican town, on the head waters of the Rio San Pedro, lat, 28º 12′, long. 106º 50′, w. central Chihuahua, Mexico.



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 23 July 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/c-mexican-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 14th, 2013


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