C- Louisiana Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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Native American Records

A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Caiasban. An unidentified village or tribe mentioned in 1687 to Joutel (Margry, Dec., in, 409, 1878), while he was staying with the Kadohadacho on Red r., of Louisiana, by the chief of that tribe as being among his enemies.

Caitsodammo. An unidentified village or tribe mentioned to Joutel in 1687 (Margry, Dec., in, 409, 1878), while he was staying with the Kadohadacho on Red r. of Louisiana, by the chief of that tribe as being among his enemies.

Campti. A village, probably of the Natchitoches, formerly on Red r. of Louisiana, about 20 m. above Natchitoches. In his report to President Jefferson in 1805, Sibley (Hist. Sketches, 1806) says the town was inhabited by the French, the Indians having left it on account of sickness in 1792. (A. C. F. )

Capiche. A village, probably of one of the southern Caddoan tribes, near Red r. of Louisiana, “20 leagues inland from the Mississippi,” visited by Tonti in 1690.

Catouinayos. An unidentified village or tribe mentioned to Joutel in 1687 (Margry, Dec., in, 409, 1878), while he was staying with the Kadohadacho on Red r. of Louisiana, by the chief of that tribe as being among his enemies.

Chactoo. A body of Indians, possibly related to the Attacapa, mentioned in 1753 as living in Louisiana. In 1805 they were on Bayou Boeuf, about 10 m. s. of Bayou Rapide, toward Opelousas, and numbered 30 men. They were not Choctaw, and in addition to their own tongue they spoke the Mobilian trade language. (A. s. G.)

Chaquantie. A tribe, probably affiliated with the Caddo confederacy, living on a N. branch of Red r. of Louisiana in the 17th century. They were met by Bienville, in 1700 (Margry, Dec., iv, 42, 1880), about 4 days journey above the Kadohadacho, who dwelt on the main stream. The people were said to be at peace with the Hainai. (A. C. F.)

Choupetoulas. A village formerly on the left bank of the Mississippi, 2 or 3 leagues above New Orleans; spoken of by Pénicaut in 1718 as old and apparently abandoned. The name of the people, who were possibly of Choctaw affinity, is perpetuated in that of a street in New Orleans. (A. S. G.)

Choye. A village, mentioned by Tonti (French, Hist. Coll. La., i, 72, 1846) in 1690, as near the settlements of the Yatasi on Red r., in the N. w. part of what is now Louisiana. The people were said to be hostile to the Kadohadacho, perhaps some passing quarrel. From its association with the Yatasi and Natasi, the village was probably inhabited by a subdivision of one of the Caddo tribes. The subsequent history of the settlement is not known; its inhabitants were probably scattered among their kindred during the contentions of the 18th century, later becoming extinct. (A. C. F. )

 

Villages of the Untied StatesLouisiana Indian Villages

This site includes some historical materials that may imply negative stereotypes reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record and should not be interpreted to mean that the WebMasters in any way endorse the stereotypes implied .

Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, Frederick Webb Hodge, 1906



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 19 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/c-louisiana-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 15th, 2013


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