C- Arizona Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Caborh. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. Ariz. (Sedelmair, 1744, quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and X. Mex., 366, 1 889) . Mentioned as distinct from the following.

Caborica. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. Ariz. Sedelmair (1744) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and X. Mex., 366, 1889.

Caca Chimir. A Papago village, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz., with a population of 70 in 1858, and 90 in 1865.

Cachanila. A village, probably Pima, on the Pima and Maricopa res., Gila r., Ariz.; pop. 503 in 1860 (Taylor in Cal. Farmer, June 19, 1863), 438 in 1869 (Browne).

Cahuabi. A Papago village in Arizona, near the Sonora border, with 350 in habitants in 1863 and 80 families in 1871. Cf. Guevavi.

Camani. A rancheria, probably of the Sobaipuri, on the Rio Gila not far from Casa Grande, s. Ariz.; visited by Anza and Font in 1775. Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 392, 1889.

Canoa  A former Papago rancheria between Tubac and San Xavier del Bac, on Rio Santa Cruz, s. Ariz. Garcés (1775), Diary, 63, 74, 1900.

Cant. A former rancheria, probably of the Maricopa, not far below the mouth of Salt r., s. Ariz.; visited and so named by Kino and Mange in 1699.

Canyon Butte. The local name for a group of interesting prehistoric pueblo ruins near the N. escarpment of the chief basin of the Petrified forest, at the source of a wash that enters Little Colorado r. from the N. E. at Woodruff, near the Apache-Navajo co. boundary, Arizona. The remains seem to indicate Zuñi origin. Hough in Rep. Nat. Mus. 1901, 309, 1903.

Carrizo  A small band of Apache, probably the clan Klokadakaydn, Carrizo or “Arrow-reed people, q. v. The name is also applied to a Navaho locality and to those Indians living about Carrizo mts., x. E. Ariz. (Cortez, 1799, in Pac. R. R. Rep., in, pt. 3, 119, 1856). In the latter case it has no ethnic significance.

Casa Blanca (so called on account of a pueblo ruin in the vicinity) . A Pima village consisting of about 50 scattered houses on Gila r., s. Ariz. It contained 535 inhabitants in 1858 and 315 in 1869.

Casa Blanca. A ruined cliff pueblo in Canyon de Chelly, in the present Navaho country, N. E. Ariz. Wheeler Survey Rep., vii, 373, 1879.

Casa Grande. A ruined pueblo, measuring 68 by 220 ft., situated a little below the junction of the Verde and Salt rs., Maricopa co., s. Ariz. Bell, New Tracks, i, 199, 1869.

Casa Montezuma (Span.: Montezuma house, also called Casa Blanca, white house). A prehistoric ruin near the Pima villages on the Gila, s. Ariz. Not to be confounded with Casa Grande nor with any other ruin, although the same name has been indiscriminately applied to various cliff-dwellings, ancient pueblos, etc., in s. w. United States and N. w. Mexico, because of their supposed ancient occupancy by the Aztec. ( F. W. H. )

Casas Grandes. A name applied to the ruins of the Franciscan mission of Concepcion, founded in 1780 by Fray Francisco Garcés, near Yuma, Ariz. Hardy, Travels in Mex., 355, 1829.

Casca (prob. Span, casco, potsherd). A Papago village, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz., with 80 families in 1865. Davidson in Ind. Aff. Rep., 135, 1865.

Causac. A former rancheria of the Sobaipuri, on the Rio San Pedro, s. Ariz., visited by Father Kino about 1697. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., i, 279, 1856.

Cerrito (Span.: little mountain). A settlement, probably of the Pima, on the Pima and Maricopa res., Gila r., s. Ariz.; pop. 258 in I860. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, June 19, 1863.

Cerro Chiquito (Span.: little mountain ) . A village, probably of the Pima, on the Pima and Maricopa res., Gila r., s. Ariz.; pop. 232 in I860. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, June 19, 1863.

Chakpahu (Hopi: speaker spring, or speaking spring). A ruined pueblo on the rim of Antelope mesa, overlooking Jeditoh valley, in the Tusayan country, N. E. Arizona. It is regarded by the Hopi as one of three “Kawaika” pueblos the others being Kawaika and Kokopki (?) from which it may be assumed that it was built and occupied by Keresan people from New Mexico, the name Kawaika being the Hopi designation of the present Keresan pueblo of Laguna.

The ruin was first described and surveyed in 1885 by V. Mindeleff, of the Bureau of American Ethnology, and in 1893 James Mooney of that Bureau was present during the excavation by some Navaho of its main spring in which a sacrificial deposit of pottery vessels was uncovered. In ground-plan the ruin recalls those of the Rio Grande pueblos, well represented in the Payupki and Sikyatki ruins of Tusayan, but the Chakpahu pottery, noted for its excellence of texture and decoration, has little in common with that of Payupki, which was occupied within historic time, while it resembles closely the Sikyatki ware. This, coupled with the fact that one of the neighboring ruined Kawaika pueblos was traditionally occupied by Kokop clans, who lived also in Sikyatki, would indicate a connection between the Sikyatki and the Kawaika people, although the former are reputed to have come from Jemez. (J. W. F. )

Charco (Span. : pool). A Papago village in s. Arizona with 50 inhabitants in 1858; probably identical with Chioro.

Chelly (pron. shay-ee, frequently shay, Spanish corruption of Navaho Tsé‛gi, or Tséyi, among the cliffs. Matthews). A canyon on the Navaho res., N. E. Ariz., in which are numerous ancient cliff-dwellings. Cortez in 1799 (Pac. R. R. Rep., in, pt. 3, 119, 1856) gave the name (Chellé) to a Navaho settlement, but this is true only in so far as the canyon contains numerous scattered hogans or huts.

Chemisez (apparently from Spanish chamizo, a species of small cane). A Pima village on the Rio Gila in Arizona; pop. 312 in 1858. Bailey in Ind. Aff. Rep. , 208, 1858.

Chichilticalli (Nahuatl: chichiltic ‘red’, calli ‘house': ‘red house’). A ruined pueblo visited by Coronado’s army on its journey to Cibola (Zuñi) in 1540; apparently situated on the Gila, E. of the mouth of the San Pedro, s. Ariz., probably not far from Solomonsville. Owing to the glowing account of the place given by Fray Marcos de Niza in the preceding year, Coronado and his followers were “much affected by seeing that the fame of Chichilticalli was summed up in one tumble-down house without any roof, al though it appeared to have been a strong place at some former time when it was inhabited, and it was very plain that it had been built by a civilized and warlike race of strangers who had come from a distance” (Castaneda). The same writer also states that it “was formerly inhabited by people who had separated from Cibola.” Many writers have wrongly identified it with the present Casa Grande. See Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Papers, in, 178, 1890; Hodge, Coronado s March, 1899; Winship, Coronado Exped., 14th Rep. B. A. E., 1896. (F. W. H.)

Chilchadilkloge (grassy-hill people). An Apache band or clan at San Carlos agency and Ft Apache, Ariz., in 1881.

Chioro. A village of 35 Papago, probably in Pima co., s. Ariz., in 1865 (Davidson in Ind. Aff. Rep., 135, 1865) . Possibly identical with Charco.

Choutikwuchik (Pima: Tcóûtĭk Wü′tcĭtck, ‘charcoal laying’). A former village of the Maricopa, in s. Arizona, which was abandoned by its inhabitants on their removal down the Gila to their present location below Gila crossing. It was then occupied by the Pima, who in turn abandoned it. Russell, MS., B. A. E., 16, 1902.

Chuba. A Papago village in s. Arizona; pop. about 250 in 1863. Ind. Aff. Rep., 385, 1863.

Chubkwichalobi (Hopi: antelope notch place). A group of ruined pueblos on the hills above Chaves pass, 20 m. s. w. of Winslow, Ariz., claimed by the Hopi to have been built and occupied by some of their clans. Excavations by the Bureau of American Ethnology in 1897 revealed mortuary objects practically identical in character with those found in the valleys of the Verde and the Gila to the southward, thus indicating a common origin. See Fewkes in 22d Rep. B. A. E. , 32, 1904.

Chukubi. A traditional settlement situated a mile N. E. of Shipaulovi, N. E. Arizona. It was occupied by the Squash, Sand, and other clans of the Hopi, who were afterward joined by the Spider clan. Being harassed by enemies, among them the Ute and the Apache, it was abandoned, its inhabitants joining those of old Mashongnovi in building the present Mashongnovi pueblo.

Chupatak (Tcüpatäk, ‘rnortar stone’). A former Pima village in s. Arizona. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 16, 1902.

Chuwutukawutuk (Tcü′wütütkawütúk, ‘earth hill’). A former Pima village in s. Arizona. Russell, Pima MS., B. A. E., 16, 1902.

Coat. A rancheria, probably of the Maricopa, visited by Kino and Mange in 1699. Mange quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 358, 1889.

Coca. A former Papago village in s. Arizona. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, June 19, 1863.

Cojate. A Papago village of 103 families in 1865, in s. w. Final co., Ariz., near the present town of the same name.

Comac. A former Pi ma rancheria, visited by Kino and Mange in 1699; situated on the Rio Gila, 3 leagues (miles?) below the mouth of Halt r., s. Ariz. S. Bartolome Comac. Mange in Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., I, 306, 1856.

Comarchdut. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. Ariz.; visited by Father Sedelmair in 1744. Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 366, 1889.

Comarsuta. A former Sobaipuri rancheria visited by Father Kino about 1697; situated on the” Rio San Pedro, s. Ariz., between its mouth and the junction of Aravaipa cr. Bernal (1697) quoted by Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 356, 1889.

Comohuabi. A Papago village in s. Ariz., on the border of Sondra; pop. 80 families in 1871. Wilbur in Ind. Aff. Rep. 1871, 365, 1872.

Cops. A former Papago rancheria visited by Kino and Mange in 1699; situated w. of the Rio San Pedro, probably in the vicinity of the present town of Arivaca, s. w. of Tubac, s. Ariz.

Cudurimuitac. A former Maricopa rancheria on the Rio Gila, s. Ariz., visited by Father Sedelmair in 1744. Bancroft, Ariz, and N. Mex., 366, 1889.

Cuercomache. Apparently a division or rancheria of the Yavapai on one of the heads of Diamond cr., near the Grand Canyon of the Colorado, Ariz., in the 18th century. They lived N. E. of the Mohave, of whom they were enemies, and are said to have spoken the same language as the Havasupai. (F. W. H.)

Cuitciabaqui. A former rancheria of the Papago, visited by Father Kino in 1697; situated on the w. bank of the Rio Santa Cruz, in the vicinity of the present Tucson, s. Ariz. According to Father Och a mission was established at the Papago settlement of “Santa Catharina” in 1756 by Father Mittendorf, but he was forced to abandon it, evidently shortly afterward, on account of cruel treatment by the natives. This is doubtless the same.

Cuitoat. A former settlement, evidently of the Papago, between San Xavier del Bac and Gila r., s. Ariz; visited by Father Garcés in 1775. The name has been confused with Aquitun.

Cumaro. A Papago village in s. Arizona, near the Sonora border, having 200 families in 1871.

Villages of the Untied States | Arizona Indian Villages

This site includes some historical materials that may imply negative stereotypes reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record and should not be interpreted to mean that the WebMasters in any way endorse the stereotypes implied .

Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, Frederick Webb Hodge, 1906



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 21 October 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/c-arizona-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 15th, 2013


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