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Biography of Elias P. Boudinot

The subject of this sketch was born January 2, 1854, the son of W. P. Boudinot, a poet and scholar, and brother of the late well-known E. C. Boudinot. Elias is a grandson of the celebrated Elias Boudinot, who was, perhaps, the most illustrious Cherokee of his day. He was almost a full blood, was educated at Cornwall, Connecticut, and there married Miss Harriet Gold, daughter of Rev. B. Gold, a Presbyterian minister, and president of the academy at Cornwall. An account of the tragical death of Elias Boudinot, Sr., will be found in the historical pages of this work. Young Elias’ mother was a member of the Fields family, one of the leading families in the Cherokee Nation. As a pupil of the old Gunnery School, Washington, Connecticut, at the age of eleven years, Elias there went through the ordinary routine of education till his fourteenth year, when he returned to his home in the Indian Territory, and dwelt upon his father’s farm for two years. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to the printers’ trade, in the office of the Cherokee Advocate, Tahlequah, and perfected himself in the craft at the establishment of Ennis & Co., St. Louis, at the age of twenty years. Returning to Tahlequah, he took charge of the typographical department of the Advocate. In that office he remained until the fall of 1879, Elias taught at intervals in the national schools for two sessions, and after resigning the position of foreman was elected editor of the Advocate, and held the position two years. In 1882, ’83, and ’84, he was connected more or less with the publication of that paper and the editing of the present laws, which is a very complete and, altogether, a very creditable work. In 1883 and 1884 Mr. Boudinot was clerk of the senate, and in 1885 was again created editor of the Advocate for a term of two years. The previous year he had commenced the study of law, and was soon practicing in the Cherokee courts. To day, after eight years practice, Mr. Boudinot can flatter himself with having prosecuted or defended more than one hundred individuals charged with capital offenses, and of being successful in gaining verdicts in all but three cases. As a criminal lawyer Mr. Boudinot stands pre-eminent at the top of the list. He is the senior partner of the firm of Boudinot, Thompson & Hastings, their office being in Tahlequah, while their practice is extended to all the courts of justice in the country. Mr. Boudinot was re-nominated for the editorship of the Advocate in 1887, but refused the offer. In 1890 he was elected a member of the town council of Tahlequah, and while in office, in connection with his father, gave the town its present code of laws. In 1891 Mr. Boudinot was appointed district clerk, and in the same year was appointed by the chief as delegate to Washington City. During council of 1891 Mr. Boudinot was chairman of the commission to negotiate with the United States for the sale of the Cherokee outlet. May 26, 1880, the subject of our sketch married Miss Addie Foreman, granddaughter of Thomas B. Wolfe, the founder of the city of Tahlequah, and a man of prominence in the Cherokee Nation. Elias Boudinot is five feet eleven and one-half inches in height, and weighs 235 pounds. He is a man of a great deal of force and magnetism, handsome and intellectual looking. His influence over a jury is said to be remarkable, while as an advocate he would rank high in any court of justice. In disposition he is good-humored and pleasant, and very popular. Mr. Boudinot is a member of the Masonic lodge. He owns a fine residence in Tahlequah, and 700 acres of land in cultivation.

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