B- Mexican Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Babasaqui. A ruined village, probably of the Papago, 3 m. above Imuris, between Cocospera and Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico.

Babiacora. A pueblo of the Teguima Opata and the seat of a Spanish mission established in 1639; situated on the Kio Sonora, Sonora, Mexico, 110 m. s. of the Arizona boundary; pop. 445 in 1678, 294 in 1730.

Babispe (from babipa, the point where the river takes a new course. Hardy). An Opata pueblo and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1645; situated on an E. branch of Rio de Babispe, in N. E. Sonora, Mexico, near the Chihuahua boundary. Pop. 402 in 1678, 566 in 1730. The town was destroyed by an earthquake in May, 1887. (F. W. H)

Baborigame. A former Tepehuane pueblo, situated in a plain lo m. in diameter, in lat. 26º 40′ , long. 107º, s. w. Chihuahua, Mexico. The settlement is now Mexicanized, but it is surrounded by Tepehuane rancherias.

Babuyagui. A pueblo founded in 1670 by Father Alvaro Flores de la Sierra with some converted Varohio of Yecarome; situated on or near the headwaters of the upper Rio Fuerte, in N. Sinaloa, Mexico. It was given a resident priest in 1673, but on the death of Sierra in that year it soon became a mere visita of the mission of Taro (Tara), whence many of the converts removed 3 years later. Bancroft, No. Mex. States, 247, 1886.

Baca (abbr. of bacapa, reed grass. Buelna). A Mayo settlement near the E. bank of Rio del Fuerte, about lat. 26º 50′, in the northernmost corner of Sinaloa, Mexico.

Bacaburiachic. A Tarahumare settlement of Chihuahua, Mexico; definite locality unknown. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 323, 1864.

Bacadegúachi. A Coguinachi Opata pueblo and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1645; situated on the Rio de Batepito, or Babispe, in E. Sonora, Mexico; pop. 370 in 1678, 272 in 1730. In 1884, when visited by Bandelier, it contained about 500 Mexicans and Mexicanized Indians, but the town was much neglected and dilapidated on account of Apache depredations.

Bacanora. A pueblo of the Eudeve division of the Opata and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1627; situated in E. Sonora, Mexico, on Rio Batepito, lat. 29 1CK, long. 109. Pop. 253 in 1678, 116 in 1730.

Bacanuchi. A rancheria, apparently of the Opata, on the E. hank of the Rio Sonora, Sonora, Mexico, in lat. 30º 40′. It was visited by Father Kino in Oct., 1706, and was the seat of a mission with 266 inhabitants in 1777 (Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., i, app., 1856). Distinct from Bacuachi.

Bacapa (said by Buelna to signify reed grass (carrizo), but the term bac, or vac, in Pima signifies house, ruined house ). A Papago rancheria in x. w. Sonora, Mexico, located slightly s. E. of Carrizal on the map of Father Kino (1701) , by whom it was visited in 1700, and by Anza and Font in 1776. Not to be confounded with Matape in any of its various forms, but identical with the later Quitobac in lat. 31º 40′, long. 112º 45′. (F. W. H.)

Bacoburito. A rancheria, apparently occupied by one of the Cahita tribes of the Piman family, situated on the Rio Petatlan, or Rio Sinaloa, in lat. 26º, N. w. Sinaloa, Mexico. Christianized early in 17th century, the natives rebelled about 1604 and burned their church, but the up rising was soon quelled by Gov. Hurtaide who put the leading rebels to death and compelled the others to rebuild the edifice. Bancroft, No. Mex. States, i, 213, 1886.

Bacuachi. A former pueblo of the Teguima Opata and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1650; situated on the head waters of the Rio Sonora, in Sonora, Mexico, below latitude 31º. It still existed as a mission in 1777 (Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., i, app., 1856). Pop. 195 in 1678, and 51 in 1730, but Bartlett (Personal Narr., i, 278, 1854) found it almost depopulated in 1851.

Bacuancos. A Pima rancheria visited by Father Kino about 1697; situated 7 leagues s. of the mission of Guevavi in Pimeria Alta, N. w. Sonora, Mexico. Probably the later Buenavista.

Bacum. A Yaqui settlement on the s. bank of the lower Rio Yaqui, s. w. Sonora, Mexico, with an estimated population of 4,000 in 1849.

Badeuachi. A former Opata village, now in ruins, a short distance w. of Rio Sonora, about lat. 30, near Huepaca and Aconchi, N. central Sonora, Mexico. Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Papers, in, 71, 1890.

Baipia. A former settlement of either the Soba or the Papago proper, situated slightly N. w. of Caborca, probably on the Rio Altar, N. w. Sonora, Mexico.

Bamoa According to Orozco y Berra, a pueblo “founded by the Pima who came with Cabeza de Vaca and his companions on that famous expedition which gave rise to the story of the Queen of Quivira and the Seven Cities. Settled on the shore of the river [Sinaloa], they received in after times a goodly number of their compatriots who, drawn by the fame of the missionaries before the latter reached their country, placed themselves in the way of receiving Christianity. They speak the Pima and generally the Mexican, being also well accustomed to the Castilian tongue.”

Banamichi. A pueblo of the Teguima Opata and the seat of a Spanish mission in 1639; situated below Arizpe, on the Rio Sonora, Sonora, Mexico; pop. 338 in 1678, 127 in 1730. Not to be con founded with Remedios, q. v.

Baqueachic (bāká ‘bamboo reed’, chik ‘place of’. Lumholtz). A Tarahumare settlement on or near the Rio Conchos, lat. 27º 40′, long. 106º 50′, Chihuahua, Mexico.

Baquiarichic. A Tarahumare settlement on or near a branch of the s. tributary of the Rio Conchos, lat. 26º 55′, long. 106º 30′, Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 322, 1864.

Baquigopa (baqui-go ‘cane'; Buelna says the name means ‘plain of the canes’). A former Opata village on the upper Yaqui, locally known as the Rio Babispe, E. of Guachinera, N. E. Sonora, Mexico. Its abandonment was the result of attacks by Indians of w. Chihuahua, the inhabitants finally settling at Guachinera. See Batesopa. (F. W. H.)

Basaseachic. A Tarahumare settlement of Chihuahua, Mexico; definite locality unknown. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 323, 1864.

Baserac (‘place where the water is seen’, because up to this point the river is so deep among the mountains that in most places it is invisible. Rudo Ensayo). An Opata pueblo, and the seat of a Spanish mission founded in 1645, on an E. branch of Rio de Batepito, a tributary of the Yaqui, in N. E. Sonora, Mexico. Population 399 in 1678, 839 in 1730. There are many descendants of the Opata in the modern town, but only a few of them speak their native tongue. ( F. W. H.)

Basigochic (sand bank, flat). A Tarahumare rancheria near Achyarachki, Chihuahua, Mexico. Cubas, Mexico, 74, 1876.

Basiroa. A Nevome division, doubtless in s. central Sonora, Mexico; definite locality unknown. The name is probably that of their settlement. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 58, 1864.

Basonopa. A Tepehuane pueblo in the Sierra Madre, on the head waters of the Rio del Fuerte, s. w. Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 324, 1864.

Basotutcan. Apparently a former rancheria of the Papago, visited by Kino in 1701; situated on the Rio Salado, 28 in. below Sonoita, N. w. Sonora, Mexico.

Batacosa. A Mayo settlement on a small independent stream w. of the Rio de los Cedros, an arm of the Rio Mayo, s. w. Sonora, Mexico.

Batepito (‘where the water turns’ (Rudo Ensayo), doubtless in allusion to the bend of the river). An Opata pueblo in N. w. Sonora, Mexico, about lat. 31, on the upper waters of the Rio Babispe, a tributary of the Rio Yaqui.

Batequi ( a well. Buelna). Apparently a rancheria of the Soba or the Papago proper; placed E. of the Rio Altar in N. W. Sonora, Mexico, on early Spanish maps, as that of Kino (1701) in Bancroft, No. Mex. States, i, 499, 1884. Not to be con founded with the Tadeo Baqui of the Maricopa, which bears also a similar name. (F. W. H. )

Batesopa. A former Opata village on the Rio Babispe, E. of Guachinera, in N. E. Sonora, Mexico. Repeatedly attacked by Indians from Chihuahua, it was abandoned, its inhabitants finally settling at Guachinera. Bandelier in Arch. Inst. Pap., in, 59, 1890; iv, 519, 1892.

Batucari (batuhue river, cari house: houses in the river; or batui dove, and cari: dove houses. Buelna). A sub division of the Cahita, speaking the Vacoregue dialect and formerly subsisting by hunting in the vicinity of a large lagoon 3 leagues from A home, N. Sinaloa, Mexico. They afterward united with the Ahome people under the Jesuit missionaries and abandoned their wandering life. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 58, 322, 1864.

Batuco (shallow water. Och). A former pueblo of the Eudeve division of the Opata, on the Rio Oposura, a w. branch of the Rio Yaqui, a league N. of Santa Marfa Batuco, about lat. 29º 30′, Sonora, Mexico. It became the seat of the Jesuit mission of San Javier about 1629. Pop. 480 in 1678, 188 in 1730.

Batuco. A former pueblo of the Opata on the Rio Oposura, a w. tributary of the Yaqui, 8 leagues E. of San Jose Matape, in Sonora, Mexico. It was apparently the Batuco that was visited by Coronado’s army in 1540-42, and was the seat of the Jesuit mission of Santa Maria founded in 1629. Population 428 in 1678, 212 in 1730.

Bawiranachiki (red water place) . A Tarahumare rancheria in Chihuahua, Mexico. Lumholtz, inf’n. 1894.

Belen. A settlement of the Yaqui, including some members of the Seri and Guayma tribes, on the N. bank of Yaqui r., about 20 in. above its mouth, in s. Sonora, Mexico. It was the seat of an important mission founded about 1678, and in 1849 its population was estimated at 3,000.

Biara. A subdivision or settlement of the Tehueco, formerly on the lower Rio Fuerte or the Fuerte-Mayo divide, N. w. Sinaloa, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 58, 1864.

Bibiana. A former rancheria, probably of the Papago, in N. w. Sonora, Mexico, between Busanic and Sonoita, near (or possibly identical with) Anamic. It was visited by Kino in 1702.

Bicam. A Yaqui settlement on the s. bank of the lower Rio Yaqui, s. w. Sonora, Mexico, with an estimated population of 9,000 in 1849.

Bichechic. A Tarahumare settlement on the headwaters of the Rio Conchos, lat, 28º 10′, long. 107º 10′, Chihuahua, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 323, 1864.

Bisani. A Pima settlement 8 leagues s. w. of Caborca, in the present Sonora, Mexico, of which it was a visita in Spanish colonial times. Pop. 178 in 1730.

Borego (sheep). An ancient settlement of the Tepecano, now in ruins, situated on the E. bank of the Rio de Bolaños, approachable from Monte Escobedo, in Jalisco, Mexico. There is a native tradition that its people warred against those of Azqueltan after the first coming of the Spaniards. Hrdlicka in Am. Anthrop., v. 409, 1903.

Buena Vista. A pueblo of the Nevome on the Rio Yaqui, about lat, 28º, in Sonora, Mexico. Orozco y Berra, Geog., 351, 1864.

Buquibava. A former Pima rancheria of Sonora, Mexico, visited by Kino about 1697-99; situated on San Ignacio r., below San Ignacio (of which mission it was subsequently a visita), at the site of the present town of Magdalena. Pop. 63 in 1730, probably including some Tepoca. (F. W. H.)



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 7 October 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/b-mexican-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Oct 14th, 2013


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