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Accominta Tribe

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Accominta Indians (possibly related to the Chippewa ä‛ku‛kŭmiga‛k, a locative expression referring to the place where land and water meet, hence, specifically, shore, shore-line – Wm. Jones.)  The name was given by the Indians to York River.

A small tribe or band of the Pennacook confederacy, commonly called Agamenticus or Accominticus, that occupied a village of the same name at or near the site of the present York, York County, Maine, to which the name “Boston” was given on some early maps. Capt. John Smith1 says that the people of this place were allied to those immediately North of them, and were subject to the bashabees of Penobscot, which would seem to place them in the Abnaki confederacy, though they are now generally and apparently correctly included in the Pennacook confederacy. Schoolcraft2 includes this area in the Pennacook dominion. Under what name the Accominta people were subsequently recognized is not known. (James Mooney, Cyrus Thomas)

Footnotes

  1. Smith, Virginia, II, 183, repr. 1819 

  2. Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, v, 222, 1856