A- California Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

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A complete listing of all the Indian villages, towns and settlements as listed in Handbook of Americans North of Mexico.

Abaxcal. A Diegueño rancheria near San Diego, Southern California. Ortega (1795) quoted by Bancroft, History California, I, 253, 1886.

Abmoctac. A former Costanoan village connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, California. Taylor in California Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Achasta. A former village of the Rumsen division of the Costanoan family, on the spot now occupied by the town of Monterey, Cal. The Rumsen were sometimes called Achastliens from the name of this settlement. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 20, 1860.

Achilla. A Costanoan village of Santa Cruz mission, Santa Cruz co., Cal., in 1819. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 5,1860.

Achillimo. A Chumashan village formerly existing near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Achois. A native place in Encina valley, s. Cal., at which the mission of San Fernando was established, Sept. 8, 1797.

Aclutoy. A village supposed to be of the Patwin division of the Copehan family which formerly lived in Napa and Yolo cos., Cal. Its inhabitants concluded a treaty with Gov. Vallejo in 1836. Bancroft, Hist. Cal., IV, 71, 1886.

Acnagis. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Acuragna. A former Gabrieleño village in Los Angeles co., Cal., at a place later called La Presa. Ried ( 1852) quoted by Taylor in Cal. Farmer, June 8, 1860.

Acyum. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Adac. A Cochimi rancheria belonging to Santa Gertrudis mission, E. side of Lower California, about lat. 27º 58′ . Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Jan. 17, 1862.

Aestaca. A Costanoan rancheria connected with Santa Cruz mission, Cal., in 1819. Olbez quoted by Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 5, 1860.

Aggavacaamanc (arroyo of the gulls (?)). A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purísima (Cadegomo) mission, w. Lower California, in the 18th century. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., v, 189, 1857.

Agtism. Mentioned as a Costanoan village near Santa Cruz mission, Cal., in 1819. Olbez quoted by Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 5, 1860.

Aguama. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Aguin. A Chumashan village w. of the Shuku village at Ventura, Ventura co., Cal., in 1542; placed by Taylor (Cal. Farmer, Apr. 17, 1863) on the beach of Las Llagas.

Ahapchingas. A former Gabrieleno rancheria in Los Angeles co., Cal.. between Los Angeles and San Juan Capistrano. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, May 11, 1860.

Ahuamhoue. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Ahuanga. A Luiseño settlement, consisting of 2 villages, about 30 m. from the coast, lat. 33º, 25′, in San Diego co., Cal. Hayes (ca. 1850) quoted by Ban croft, Nat, Races, I, 460, 1882.

Ahwaste. A division of the Costanoan family formerly living near San Francisco bay, Cal., and connected with Dolores mission.

Aiapai. Mentioned by Powers (Cont. N. A. Ethnol., in, 370, 1877) as a division of the Yokuts at Soda Spring, on Tule r., Cal., but it is merely the name of a locality at which the Yaudanchi or perhaps other divisions once lived. ( A. L. K.)

Aika. A former Shasta village near Hamburg Bar, on Klamath r., Siskiyou co., Cal. (R. B. D. )

Akachumas. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Gatschet in Chief Eng. Rep., pt. in, 553, 1876.

Akaitsuk. A former Chumashan village about Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal.

Alacupusyuen. A former Chumashan village near Purísima mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Alahulapas. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Gatschet in Chief Eng. Rep., pt. 3, 553, 1876.

Alali. A former Chumashan village on Santa Cruz id., off the coast of California.

Alamo Bonito (Span.: beautiful cottonwood). A small settlement of Mission Indians on Torres res., 75 m. from Mission Tule River agency, s. Cal. California Mission Indians

Alcash. A former Chumashan village at La Goleta, or, as stated by a Santa Barbara Indian, on Moore’s ranch, near Santa Barbara, Cal.

Alcoz. A former village of the Kalindaruk division of the Costanoan family in California. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 20, 1860.

Aleta. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Alican. A former Chumashan village at Canada Maria Ignacio, near Santa Barbara, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 24, 1863.

Alizway. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Alloc. A Chumashan village w. of Pueblo de las Canoas (San Buenaventura), Ventura co., Cal., in 1542 (Cabrillo, Narr., 1542, in Smith, Coll. Doc., 181, 1857). Placed by Taylor on the rancho Orteaga, near the beach.

Alpincha. A former Chumashan village near the center of the present town of Santa Barbara, Cal.

Altahmos. A division of the Costanoan family formerly living on San Francisco bay, Cal., and connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco.

Aluenchi. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Alwathalama. A former Chumashan village at the marsh of Goleta, near Santa Barbara, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 24, 1863.

Alyeupkigna. A former Gabrieleno rancheria in Los Angeles co., Cal., at a place later called Santa Anita.

Amaikiara. A former Karok village on the w. bank of Klamath r., at the rapids a mile or two below the mouth of Salmon r., N. w. Cal. Though not a large village, it was of importance because an annual salmon ceremony and the jumping dance were held here. Together with most of the villages near the mouth of the Salmon it was burned by the whites in the summer of 1852. (A. L. K.)

Amalgua (island of the mists). An island off the w. coast of Lower California, about lat. 30º, on which was a Cochimi rancheria. Venegas, Hist. Cal., II, 437, 1757.

Amani-ini (mescal corner) . A rancheria, probably Cochimi. connected with Purísima mission, Lower California, in the 18th century.

Amen (A’men). A village or a group of 3 adjacent villages of the Yurok on the coast 6 m. N. of the mouth of Klamath r., Cal., their northernmost habitation. (A. L. K.)

Ametzilhacaamanc (mouth of the sandy arroyo). A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purísima mission, Lower California, in the 18th century. Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., v, 190, 1857.

Amolomol (Amó′lomŏl ) . A former Chumashan village at the old wharf at Santa Barbara, Cal. Henshaw, Buenaventura MS. vocab., B, A. E., 1884.

Amonces. A tribe or division, presumably of the Yokuts, said to have lived on San Joaquin r., Cal., in 1854. Henley in Ind. Aff. Rep., 512, 1854.

Amutaja. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Anacbuc. A Chumashan village w. of Pueblo de las Canoas (San Buenaventura), Ventura co., Cal., in 1542. Cabrillo (1542) in Smith, Coll. Doc. Fla., 181,1857.

Anacoac. A. Chumashan village between Goleta and Pt Conception, Cal., in 1542. Cabrillo (1542) in Smith, Coll. Doc. Fla., 189, 1857.

Anacot. A Chumashan village between Goleta and Pt Conception, Cal., in 1542 (Cabrillo (1542) in Smith, Coll. Doc., 188, 1857) ; evidently distinct from Anacoat.

Anamas. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1801.

Anamon. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Anchin. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Anchu. A Cochimi rancheria of San Juan de Londo mission, Lower California. Picolo in Stőcklein, Neue Welt-Bott, no. 72, 36, 1792.

Anejue. A former Chumashan village near Santa Barbara, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 24, 1863.

Animpayamo. A former village of the Kalindaruk, a division of the Costanoan Indians, connected with San Carlos mission, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Apr. 20, 1860.

Ansactoy. A village, probably of a part of the Patwin division of the Copehan family which formerly lived in Napa and Yolo cos. , Cal. It concluded a treaty of peace with Gov. Vallejo in 1836. Bancroft, Hist. Cal., iv, 71, 1886.

Ansaimes. A village, said to have been Costanoan, in California; situated in the mountains 25 m. E. of the Mutsun, whom the inhabitants of this village attacked in 1799-1800. Engelhardt, Franciscans in Cal., 397, 1897.

Antap. A former Chumashan village at the mill near San Pedro, Ventura co., Cal. Henshaw, Buenaventura MS. vocab., B. A. E., 1884.

Aogni. A former Chumashan village in Ventura co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, July 24, 1863.

Apangasi. A former Miwok village on Tuolumne r., Tuolumne co., Cal.

Apeche. A Luiseno village w. of San Luis Rey mission, San Diego co., Cal. Jackson and Kinney, Rep. Miss. Inds., 29, 1883.

Aperger. The Yurok name of a Karok village on the w. bank of Klamath r., several miles below Orleans Bar, said to consist of 10 houses in 1852. (A. L. K. )

Apil. A Costanoan village, containing neophytes in 1819 according to Friar Olbez; situated near the mission of Santa Cruz, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer. Apr. 5, 1860.

Aplache. Given as the name of a band and its village on upper Tuolumme r., Tuolumne co., Cal., in 1850. According to Adam Johnson (Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, iv, 407, 1854) the people could not speak the Miwok language; nevertheless, judging by their location and the bands with which they are mentioned, it is probable that they belonged to the Moquelumnan family.

Apyu. The Yurok name of the northern part of the important Karok village of Katimin, on Klamath r., Cal., a mile above the mouth of the Salmon. (A.L.K.)

Aramay. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Aranimokw. The Yurok name of a Karok village near Red Cap cr. , an affluent of Klamath r., Cal. (A. L. K.)

Ashegen. A Yurok village on the coast of California, 5 or 6m. s. of the mouth of Klamath r. (A. L. K.)

Ashipak  (in the basket). A Karok village on Klamath r., a few miles above the mouth of Salmon r., in Siskiyou co., N. w. Cal.

Asimu. A Chumashan village w. of Pueblo de las Canoas (San Buenaventura), Ventura co. , Cal. , in 1542. Cabrillo (1542) in Smith, Colec. Doc., 181, 1857.

Asisufuunuk. A Karok village on Klamath r. at Happy Camp, at the mouth of Indian cr., N. w. Cal. (A. L. K.)

Asiuhuil. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Aspasniagan. A former village of the Chalones, of the Costanoan family, near Soledad mission, Monterey co., Cal.

Assunta. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Astakiwi (es-ta-he′, ‘hot spring’. Powers) . A Shastan village near Canby, in Warm Springs valley, Modoc co., Cal., whose people were described by Powers (Cont. N. A. Ethnol., in, 267, 1877) as most miserable and squalid, having been brutalized not only by their scanty and inferior diet, but also by the loss of their comeliest maidens and best young men, who were carried off into slavery by the Modoc.

Asumpcion. A group of Alchedoma rancherias on or near the Rio Colorado, in California, more than 50 m. below the mouth of Bill Williams fork. They were visited and so named by Fray Francisco Garcés in 1776. Garcés, Diary, 426, 1900.

Asystarca. A former Costanoan village of central California attached to the mission of San Juan Bautista. Engelhardt, Franciscans in Cal., 398, 1897.

Ataakut. A village of the Tolowa formerly situated on the coast of N. Cal. Dorsey in Jour. Am. Folklore, III, 236, 1890.

Atarpe. A former village, presumably Costanoan, connected with Dolores mission, San Francisco, Cal.

Atsep. A Yurok village on lower Klamath r., 5 m. below the mouth of Trinity r., N. Cal.

Atsepar. The uppermost village of the Yurok on Klamath r., Cal., situated at the mouth of Bluff cr., 6 m. above the junction of Trinity r.

Atsugewi. A Shastan tribe formerly residing in Hat Creek, Burney, and Dixie valleys, Cal. Their language is quite divergent from that of the Achomawi, from whom they regard themselves as distinct. Very few of them survive. (K. B. D.)

Atuami. A Shastan tribe formerly living in Big valley, Lassen co., Cal.

Augustine. A rancheria and reservation of 615 acres of desert land occupied by Mission Indians; situated 75 m. from the Mission Tule River agency, s. Cal. Rep. Ind. Aff., 175, 1902.

Aulintac. A Costanoan village at Santa Cruz mission, Cal. The name has been taken for a dialectic division of the Costanoan family.

Ausion. A former Chumashan village near Purísima mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal. Taylor in Cal. Farmer, Oct. 18, 1861.

Avolabac. A rancheria, probably Cochimi, connected with Purísima mission, Lower California, about lat. 26 20 . Doc. Hist. Mex., 4th s., v, 189, 1857.

Awashlaurk. A former Chumashan village near Santa Inez mission, Santa Barbara co., Cal.

Awhawhilashmu. A former Chumashan village on the coast between Pt Conception and Santa Barbara, Cal., in the locality now called Punta Capitan.

Awhut. A Diegueño rancheria in N. Lower Cal. whose inhabitants spoke the Hataam dialect. Gatschet, Yuma Spr., 107, 1886.

Ayotl. A Yurok village 1 m. above the mouth of Blue cr., on Klamath r., N. Cal.

Azucsagna. A former Gabrieleño rancheria in Los Angeles co., Cal., at the locality now called Azusa. Hoffman in Bull. Essex Inst, xvii, 2, 1885.

Villages of the Untied States California Indian Villages

This site includes some historical materials that may imply negative stereotypes reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record and should not be interpreted to mean that the WebMasters in any way endorse the stereotypes implied .

Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, Frederick Webb Hodge, 1906



MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 26 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/a-california-indian-villages-towns-and-settlements.htm - Last updated on Nov 7th, 2013


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