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Biography of Price Hopkins

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The parents of Price, William, John and Patsey Hopkins, were natives of Queen Anne County, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County. Their children married and lived near the old home place, in the same County. Price was married twice; first to a daughter of Rev; James Price, a pioneer preacher of Virginia, and second to a Miss Slater. By his first wife he had William M., John, Ann, and Sally; we have no record of the names of his children by his second wife. William M. was born July 14, 1802, and was married to Nancy Hudnall, of Bedford County, in 1832. In 1837 they bade farewell to their native place, and started toward the setting sun to find a new home. They settled on Loutre creek, in Montgomery County, near Bryant’s store, in the fall of the same year, and Mr. Hopkins set diligently to work in the cultivation and improvement of his farm. He was an industrious, honest, upright man, and enjoyed the esteem and respect of his fellow citizens in the highest degree, who manifested their confidence in him by repeatedly electing him to the important position of Justice of the Peace. He was an excellent farmer, and rarely ever complained of short crops or hard times, as his barns and cribs were always full of grain, and his stock never had to live on short allowances. He remained on his farm on Loutre until 1855, when he removed to a farm near Montgomery City, where he resided until his death, which occurred on the 11th day of August, 1875. He became a member of the Baptist Church some twenty years before his death, and ever afterward lived a consistent Christian life, doing all he could for the cause of morality and religion in his community. He took an active interest in everything that promised to advance the good of the people with whom he had cast his lot, and when he was called away his neighbors felt that they had lost a friend and counsellor whose place could not easily be filled. His widow and six children survive him. He had nine children in all, but three preceded him to the grave. By his frugality and industry he was enabled to leave his family in good circumstances, and they can now attribute the prosperity which they enjoy to his kind and fatherly interest in their future welfare.

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