Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Slightly Mixed Sometimes

Discover your
family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

choose a state:
Start Now

How much the events of the war have been twisted, confused, and mixed up in the annual reunions, it is impossible for any but the most exact historian to tell. Some of the more important events of the war are slightly confused in the minds of many.

W. R. Sirrine of Paw Paw, related an anecdote which shows to good advantage the discipline of the troops. “When we were at Lookout Mountain,” said Comrade Sirrine, “we established a convalescent camp which we maintained a half mile from the quarters of the regiment. I was detailed to take command of the camp, look after the guards, and among other things, to grow a garden for the officers’ mess. But, I regret to report, I forgot all about my gar-den, and what should have gone to the officers’ mess went to the boys, some of whom are here tonight.”

“Jimmie” Bullard, although a member of the 4th Michigan Cavalry, was present to assist in the singing and to relate for the-well, it’s an old story, anyway-the story of the capture of Jefferson Davis, the president of the confederacy, in which he played a rather prominent part. When it comes to the singing end of the camp fire, Comrade “Jimmy” is right there with the “goods.” All alone, he sang all the verses of the late popular song hit, “Marching Through Georgia,” the audience joining in the chorus. It was a splendid spectacle to see all those old fellows standing and singing the song which “started the world along.” And the 13th Michigan can appreciate that song, too, for they were with Sherman to a man, and saw some good service under that general’s command.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Pin It on Pinterest


Share This

Share this post with your friends!