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Mackinac Marriage Records 1790-1799

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January 21, 1792, I, the undervsigned Justice of the Peace, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Jean Baptiste La Borde dit Sans regret, and of marguerite Machar Chevalier, In the presence of the undersigned witnesses * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.1

Alexis Laframboise; J. B. Barthe; C. Gaultier; Joseph Laframboise; J. B. la Borde Di Sanregret; Ezechiel Solomon; John Kirby; Louis Chevalier, + His Mark; Madme Gaultier, + Her Mark.


March 19, 1792, I the Undersigned, Commandant of this Post, received the Mutual Marriage Consent of Alexis Laframboise, Esquire, and of Josette Adhemar,2 in the presence of the Undersigned witnesses, in the House of Gabriel Cotté, Esquire, Michilimakinac, * * *

Edw. Charleton3, Capt. 5th Reg. Comg.

J. B. Barthe; Chles Chaboillez; C. Gaultier; Benjamin Roche4 , Lieut. 5th foot; J. Laframboise; R. Widenham; Charles Morison; W. Gleadowe, Ensign 5th foot5 ; Josette Adhemar; Alexis Laframboise; Adhemar St Martin.


July 1, 1792, I, the undersigned, one of His Majesty’s justices of the peace, received the Mutual Marriage Consent of Sieur Charles Chandonnet and of Charlotte Marcot in the presence of the undersigned witnesses, in The house of Sieur Daniel Bourassa at Michilimakina * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Char. Chandonette; Dl. Bourassa; Chadonat; James King; Jean Baptiste la Borde; C. Langlade, fils6 ; Be Molaire, + his mark; M. Bisbois;7 C. Gaultiere; Jean Mopreesk.


January 14, 1794, I the undersigned, one of His Majesty’s justices of the peace, received The mutual Marriage Consent of Paul Gina and of Marie Josephte, In the presence of the undersigned witnesses, in the House of Sieur Gabriel Cotté, Esquire, at Michilimakina, * * *

D. Mitchell, J. P.8

Alexis Laframboise; Jos. Blunt Lehke; E. Young; J. B. Barthe; Patrice Adhemar; Guillaume aMothe; Adhemar St Martin; Harriet Blunt; Louisa Hamilton;9 Blon Deau Adhemar; Adhemar Larfamboise; Angelique Adhemar; Paul Gina, + his mark; Marie Josephte, + her mark.


February 6, 1794, I the Undersigned, one of His Majesty’s justices of the Peace, received The mutual Marriage Consent of Jean Baptiste La Fontaine and of Marguerite, In the presence of the Undersigned witnesses, in the House of Mr Alexis La Framboise at Michilimakinak * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Alexis Laframboise; R. Young; T. Pothier; Angelique Adhemar; + Nane Deau; Patrice Adhemar; Adhemar Laframboise; Marguerite, + Her Mark.


June 25, 1794, I, the undersigned priest and apostolic Missionary, Received the mutual consent of Jean Bouga and of Jeanne, the former a negro and the latter a negress, both free, and I gave them the nuptial Benediction in the presence of the following witnesses, towit: Messr. Jean Nicolas Marchesseaux, Hamelin, the elder, Francois Soulignny, Charles Chandonnet, some of whom signed; the others, being unable to write, made their usual marks. * * *

Le Dru, apostolic Missionary.

On the same day and in the presence of the same witnesses aforesaid. The husband and wife acknowledged as their legitimate daughter a girl called Charlotte, about twelve years old, and have signed.

Le Dru, apostolic Missionary.10

F. Hamelin; Marchessau; Fr. Souligny; Charles Chaudonnet.


October 26, 1794, I the Undersigned, one of his majesty’s justices of the peace, received the mutual Marriage consent of Baptiste Mineville and of Charlotte, a woman Savage, In the presence of the undersigned witnesses, in the house of Sieur Robert McKenzie, at Michilimakinac on the day and in the year Above written.

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Witness: Robert Mc Kenzie; Robt. Campbell; Alex. Shaw; Ezechiel Solomon; Bte Mineville, + his mark; Charlotte, + her mark; Pr. McGulpin, + his mark.


September 21, 1795, I the Undersigned, one of His Majesty’s justices of the Peace, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Sieur Laurent Bertrand and of Dame Felicité Pilot, widow Carignant, In the presence of the undersigned witnesses in Madame Carignant’s House, * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Laurant Bertrand; Felicite Pillet Bertrand; G. L. Mothier; J. B. Barthe; Dl. Bourassa.


July 29, 1796, after granting dispensation from three Bans, I received the consent of and gave the nuptial Benediction, according to the ceremonies of the Holy Roman Church, to Alexis la Framboise, born at Three Rivers in Canada, of Jean Baptiste and of Genevieve le Bissoniere; and Josepte Adhemar, born at Detroit, of Antoine Adhemar and of Genevieve Blondeau, already civilly married as appears in the present register; the Undersigned Witnesses present and consenting.

Adhemar St Martin. Levadoux, Vicar-General.11

Alexis Laframboise; Adhemar Laframboise; Joseph Laframboise; Francois Laframboise; Isidore Lacroix; C. J. Adhemar; D. L. Solomonton [?]; Angelique Adhemar; Patrice Adhemar, witness.


July 30, 1796, after granting dispensation from three bans, in the presence of [witnesses] Joseph Laurent Bertrand [and Felicité Pillett] widow of Jean Louis la Carignant, we received their mutual consent and gave them the nuptial Benediction * * * in the presence of Jean Ecuyer and of Francois le Sieur, all of whom signed with us.12

Levadoux Vicar-general.

Laurent Bertrand; Felicité Pillett; Jean Ecuyer, witness; Francois Lesieur, witness.


August 8, 1796, after granting dispensation from the three bans, to Michel Brisbois, son of age of Joseph and of Marguerite Nault, of the parish of Yamaska, diocese of Quebek, and to Domitille Gautier, minor daughter of Charles and Madeleine Chevalier, of the parish of Michilimakina, authorized by Mr Her father, I received their consent and gave them the nuptial Benediction according to the rite of the roman church, there being present and consenting: Charles Gaultier, father of the bride, Isidore la Croix, John Reeves, Antoine Guillory, all of whom signed with us, as did also the husband, the wife declaring that she could not sign her name when thereunto requested.

Levadoux, Vicar-general.

M. Brisbois; Jean Reeves; C. Gaultier; Isidore La Croix; Antoine Guillory.


January 21, 1797, I, the undersigned, one of the judges of the Peace for this District, received the mutual Marriage consent of Sieur Andre Charlebois and of Demoiselle Josephe Hamelin. In the presence of the undersigned witnesses, in the House of Mr Louis Hamlin, the father, on The day and in the year Above written, at Michilimakinac.

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

A. Laframboise; L. Hamelin; H. Burbeck13 , major commanding; Eben Massey, Lt. Art. & Eng;14 A. Prior, Capt 1st Regt15 ; Jno. Michael, Lieut. 1st U. S. Regt.16 ; Bouthillier; Chaboillez; Geo. Schindler,17 E. Solomon; L. Bertrand; M. Labruyere; J. Bte Gatien.18


December 7, 1797, I, the Undersigned, one of the Justices of the Peace for this District, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Sieur Michel Labruyer and of Inawois Kamoquay, of the Sauteux nation, in the presence of the Undersigned witnesses, in the House of Sieur Labruyere, at Michilimakinak. * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

M. Labruyer; G. E. Young; Dl. Bourassa; C. Maillet; L. Hamelin; Alexis Laframboise; T. Bouthillier.


July 23, 1798, I, the Undersigned, one of the justices of the of the Peace for this District, received the mutual Marriage consent of Sieur Isidore Pelletier and of Demoiselle Sophie Solomon, In the presence of the Undersigned Witnesses, in the House of Sieur Ezechiel Solomon,19 at Michilimakinac on The day and in the year Above written.

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Isidore Pellatier, + his mark; Sophia Solomon; Ezechiel Solomon; George Meldrum; Ignace Petit; Charles Morison; Saml Solomon; William Solomon; Francois Lanelault, + his mark; Solomon, Junr; James Clark.


January 28, 1799, I, the Undersigned, one of the justices of the Peace of the United States, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Sieur Andre La Chaine and of Dame Suzanne Hirebour In the presence of the Undersigned witnesses, at Makinac, in the House of the said Dame Hirebour. * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Andre Lachaine, + His Mark; Suzanne Hirebuor, + Her Mark; Alexis Laframboise; Charles Maillet; David Mitchell; Adhemar; A. Laframboise.


May 16, 1799, I the Undersigned, one of the justices of the Peace of the United States, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Sieur Charles Maillet and of Demoiselle Isabelle McDonald, In the presence of the Undersigned witnesses at McKinac In the house of Sieur John McDonald20 * * *

Adhemar St Martin J. P.

Charles Maillet; Isabella McDonald; Alexis Laframbois; H. Burbeck; Jno. Michael; Margaret Michael; John Reid; John Mc Donald; Elizabeth McDonald.


July 22, 1799, after three publications of bans of marriage between Pierre La Croix, son of age of Pierre La Croix and of Therese La France, a native of Quebec now residing in this Parish, of the one part; and Marie McGulpin, minor daughter of Patrick McGulpin and Madeleine Crequi, a native of the Parish of Ste Anne du Detroit and now residing in this parish, of the other part – no impediment having been discovered – We, the Undersigned, Priest, received their mutual marriage consent * * * in the presence of Patrick McGulpin, father of the bride, of Thomas Richardson, of Jean Baptiste La Borde, of Jean Baptiste Gatien, who signed with us on the day and in the year above written.

Gabriel Richard.21

Jn Bte Gatien : Pierre Lacroix, + his mark; Marie McGulpin, + her mark; Jean Baptiste la Borde; Patt. McGulpin.


August 5, 1799, after one publication of bans, with dispen sation from the two others, between Jacques Vasseur^ son of Jacques Vasseur and of Madeleine Gatien, a native of Montreal, of the one part; and Madeleine of the Outawas Nation, bap tized the same day, there being no opposition whatsoever thereto. We, the LTndersigned priest, received their mutual consent and gave them the nuptial benediction and legitimized five children whom they acknowledged, namely: Marie Louise, about eleven years old; Jacques, about nine aud a half years old; Louis, about eight years old; Genevieve, about seven years old; and Joseph, bom on the eighth of the month of August 1797. The whole in the presence of Pierre Queri, of Augustin Hamelin and of others who signed with us. Gabriel Eichard, priest.

P. Thierry, witness; Madelaine, + Her Mark; August Hamelin; Jac Vasseur.

Footnotes

  1. A well-known family of Detroit, whose ancestor came there in 1709. At what time this person was appointed justice of the peace at Mackinac does not appear. 

  2. See a reference to this family in Wisconsin Historical Collections, xiv, p. 20. 

  3. Capt. Edward Charleton was captain in the 5th infantry of the British army in 1783. Apparently he was commandant at Fort Michilimackinac from 1790-92. In 1794 he was promoted to a majority, and three years later retired on half-pay, dying at his English home in 1839. 

  4. Benjamin Roche, of the same regiment, entered the army in 1782, being made lieutenant of the 5th in 1789. In 1796 he was transferred to the 30th as captain, and either died or resigned in 1801. 

  5. William Gleadowe was made ensign of the 5th in 1788, and retired therefrom in 1795. 

  6. Charles Langlade Jr. was the son of Charles Langlade Sr. and an Ottawa woman, being born before the latter’s marriage in 1754. This half-breed was educated in Montreal, and became an Indian trader and interpreter. He was first employed in the latter capacity in 1782; and having been made ensign in the British Indian department, migrated to St. Joseph’s Island with the garrison in 1796. There he was chosen in 1799 as official interpreter, to succeed Lamothe. He aided in the recapture of Mackinac by the British in 1812, and in the repulse of the Americans in 1814. After the war he retired to Drummond Island, and probably died there. His descendants were recently living in Canada; see Ontario Historical Society Records, iii, pp. 147-149. Angelique Langlade, with whom an interview is there given, was probably the granddaughter (not the daughter) of Charles Langlade Jr., and either she or her interviewer has confused the facts in the life of her grandfather and great-grandfather, making them appear as one. 

  7. Michael Brisbois was born in Maska, Canada, in 1759. While being educated at Quebec, he was one of a corps of students enrolled to repel Montgomery’s invasion in 1775. In 1779 Brisbois entered the fur-trade, arriving at Mackinac that year. Within a year or more he had permanently settled at Prairie du Chien, where he became the leading citizen. His trade was with the Winnebago Indians, and in the decade of the nineties he had a post near Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. He had several children by a Winnebago woman, and married in 1796 the daughter of Charles Gautier. In 1809 he received an American commission as militia lieutenant of Illinois Territory; his sympathies, however, in the War of 1812-15, were with the British, to whom he furnished supplies, but personally he was non-combatant. He was arrested about 1816 for treason, being defended at St. Louis by Thomas H. Benton, who secured his acquittal. In 1829 Brisbois became blind, and died at his Prairie du Chien home in 1837. See interview with his son, in Wisconsin Historical Collections, ix, pp. 282-285; also numerous references in other volumes of this series. 

  8. David Mitchell came to America in 1771, entering the British army as surgeon’s mate in 1774. Soon thereafter his regiment was ordered to Mackinac, and upon its removal (1783) Dr. Mitchell continued his services until relieved in 1786. Meanwhile he had married a Chippewa woman, and had a fine house and garden upon the island. He entered the Indian trade and was made justice of the peace for his district. Upon the removal of the British, Dr. Mitchell, set up an establishment on St. Joseph’s Island, but his wife elected to remain at Mackinac. In 1811 he was reappointed surgeon in the Indian Department, and aided in the British invasion of 1812. At the close of the war, he retired with the troops to Drummond Island, where he remained in public service until his death, which occurred after 1825. His wife was one of the best-known residents of early Mackinac; see Wisconsin Historical Collections, xiv, pp. 35-38. 

  9. Probably a daughter of Dr. Mitchell; see Wisconsin Historical Collections, ix, p. 204. 

  10. F. le Dru was a Dominican priest, who had been employed in Canada. In 1788 he was sent by Archbishop Carroll to the Illinois, and about 1790 retired to the Spanish side of the Mississippi, where he accepted a parish. Some time about 1796, he was at Detroit, where he is spoken of as “an apostate.” He seems to have been the first American priest at Mackinac. 

  11. Michel Levadoux was appointed (1796) vicar-general of the Northwest Territory by Archbishop Carroll at Baltimore. He took charge of the church at Detroit, but made visitations to Mackinac, until recalled to Baltimore in 1801, after which he returned to France. 

  12. This is the religious entry for the civil marriage performed by the justice of the peace the preceding year. Something was omitted, in the original, but this is tentatively supplied in brackets. 

  13. Maj. Henry Burbeck was of Massachusetts, and had been in the Revolution. In 1791 he was commissioned major of artillery and engineers, and served through the Northwest campaign with great efficiency, being much trusted by Wayne and Hamtramck. His sojourn at Mackinac seems to have been from 1796-99. In 1798 he was promoted to a lieutenant-colonelcy, and in 1802 to a colonelcy. Brevetted brigadier in 1812, he served through the War of 1812-15, and was honorably discharged, dying in 1848. 

  14. Eben Massey, of the corps of artillery and engineers, entered the army from Maryland (1792) as lieutenant. Promoted to be captain in 1798, he died Sept. 3 of the following year. 

  15. Capt. Abner Prior was from New York, and had served in the Revolution as surgeon’s mate. In 1786 he was commissioned ensign in the regular army, lieutenant in 1790, and captain two years later. He was very efficient in Wayne’s campaign, and so severely wounded at Fallen Timbers that his death was reported. On the reorganization of 1796, he entered the 1st infantry, dying in 1800. 

  16. John Michael (Mishall) of Pennsylvania enlisted as ensign in 1792. Two years later he became lieutenant, and in 1799 captain. He was honorably discharged in 1802. 

  17. George Schindler seems to have come to the upper country as a soldier, and remained to enter the fur-trade; see Wisconsin Historical Collections, xiv, pp. 17, 22, 52. 

  18. These names bear witness to the American occupation of Fort Mackinac, which occurred in the autumn of 1796. A company of artillery, and one of the 1st infantry, appear to have been detailed to take possession under these officers. 

  19. For this person see Wisconsin Historical Collections, vol. xviii, p. 254, note 50. His descendants removed to Drummond Island, and later to Penetanguishine on Georgian Bay; see interview with grandson in Ontario Historical Society Records, iii, pp. 127- 129. 

  20. John McDonald was a British soldier, who was assistant barrack-master under the last English commandant. After the troops retired to St. Joseph’s Island, he seems to have remained at Mackinac. 

  21. Father Gabriel Richard has been called “the apostle of Michigan.” Born in Saintes, the ancient capital of the Santones, France (1761), he was educated at Angers, and consecrated to the priesthood in Paris (1791). A member of the Sulpician order, the hostilities of the French Revolution drove him into exile. In 1792 he came to Baltimore, and was sent to minister to the French of the Illinois. He served there for six years, traveling in a wide circuit from Ste. Genevieve to Cahokia.In 1798 he was appointed to Detroit, arriving there in June of that year. The following year he took a voyage to Mackinac, where he remained for three months, bringing the voyageurs and Christian Indians to a remembrance of their religious duties. His vast parish extended from Detroit to Sault Ste. Marie and Prairie du Chien. He does not appear to have visited Wisconsin until 1820. Father Richard being an American, was during the War of 1812-15 arrested and confined by the British at Sandwich. In 1823 he was elected territorial delegate from Michigan to the United States House of Representatives, being the first priest to sit therein. Two years later, however, he failed of re-election. He was active in educational movements, opening schools in Detroit and elsewhere, and aiding in the foundation of the Univer sity of Michigan. The first printing press set up in Detroit (1807) was ordered by Father Richard. Indefatigable in good works, he cared for the sick and dying during the cholera epidemic, only to fall himself a victim to the disease (Sept. 13, 1832). 


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