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Passamaquoddy Tribe

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Passamaquoddy Indians (Peskěděmakâdi ‘plenty of pollock.’) A small tribe belonging to the Abnaki confederacy, but speaking nearly the same dialect as the Malecite.  They formerly occupied all the region about Passamaquoddy bay and on the St. Croix river and Schoodic lake, on the boundary between Maine and New Brunswick.  Their principal village was Gunasquamekook, on the site of St Andrews, N.B.  They were restricted by the pressure of the white settlements, and in 1866 were settled chiefly at Sebaik, near Perry, on the south side of the bay, and on Lewis Island.  They had other villages at Calais, on Schoodic lake in Washington county, Maine and on St. Croix river in New Brunswick.

They were estimated at about 150 in 1726, 130 in 1804, 379 in 1825, and from 400 to 500 in 1859.

The Passamaquoddy and Penobscot tribes send to the Maine legislature a representative who is permitted to speak only on matters connected with the affairs of the Indian reservations1.  See Abnaki

Footnotes

  1. Prince in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc XXXVI, 481, 1897 

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