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Will of William Betts – 1673

WM. BETTS, Yonkers. “The Twelfth day of the Twelfth month 1673.” “I William Betts of the Yonckers Plantation, in the Jurisdiction now of New Orange so called.” Leaves to wife Alice, “house, barn and home lot, and meadows that are lying by my house lot,” also one third of my lot in the Planting Field, during her life: Also leaves her household goods. Leaves to son Samuel Betts, after his wife’s decease, the said house, Home lot and meadows, and one third of all lands in the Yonckers Plantation. Also a Home lot next to the home lot of Goodman Newman, in the Town of Westchester. Also six acres of meadow next to Samel Barrets, in the west meadow of Westchester. Leaves to son Hopestill Betts, one third of his lands in the Planting Field, and one third of the rest of his lands in the Yonckers Plantation. Also “eight acres of fresh meadow lying to the west of Long neck in Westchester.” Leaves to son John Betts, one third of land in the Planting Field and one third of land in the Yonckers Plantation, also two six acre lots of meadow in the west meadow of Westchester, next to Consider Woods, and six acres I bought of Cregier next to Consider Woods, and the other six acre lot lying between the meadow of Edward Walters and meadow of Joseph Hunt, of Westchester. And he is to live with his mother during her life, and manage her farm and stock. Also leaves to son John, “my house and orchard and two home lots next to the orchard, and eleven...

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Houghton Otis

Otis, Arthur Houghton; Northern Ohio mgr. Otis Elevators Co.; born, Yonkers, N. Y., Aug. 21, 1881; son of Norton Prentiss and Elizabeth Fahs Otis; educated, Yonkers public and High School, and Princeton University, B. S., 1906; married, Cleveland, June 21, 1912, Mildred Vilas; issue, Malcolm V. and Arthur H., Jr.; since graduation from college, connected with The Otis Elevators Co.; mgr. for Northern Ohio; his father, who died in 1904, was pres. of the Otis Elevators Co.; was a native of Vermont; member of New York Assembly, and Mayor of Yonkers; served two terms in Congress, and in 1900, was one of the United States Commissioners to the International Exposition in Paris; member Tiger Inn, Hermit, and Athletic...

Manhattan Tribe

Manhattan Indians (‘the hill island,’ or ‘the island of hills,’ from manah ‘island’, –atin ‘hill.’ Tooker). A tribe of the Wappinger confederacy that occupied Manhattan Island and the east bank of Hudson river and shore of Long Island Sound, in Westchester County, New York. Early Dutch writers applied the name also to people of neighboring Wappinger tribes. The Manhattan had their principal village, Nappeckamack, where Yonkers now stands, and their territory stretched to Bronx river. From their fort, Nipinichsen, on the north bank of Spuyten Duyvil creek, they sallied out in two canoes to attack Hendrik Hudson when he returned down the river in 1609. Manhattan Island contained several villages which they used only for hunting and fishing. One was Sapohanikan. The island was bought from them by Peter Minuit on May 6, 1626, for 60 guilders’ worth of trinkets1 . Their other lands were disposed of by later sales.FootnotesMartha J. Lamb, Hist. City of N. Y., I, 53,...

From Yonkers to West Point along the Hudson River

Passing Glenwood, now a suburban station of Yonkers, conspicuous from the Colgate mansion near the river bank, built by a descendant of the English Colgates who were familiar friends of William Pitt, and leaders of the Liberal Club in Kent, England, and “Greystone,” once the country residence of the late Samuel J. Tilden, Governor of New York, and presidential candidate in 1876, we come to Hastings to Dobbs Ferry Hastings, where a party of Hessians during the Revolutionary struggle were surprised and cut to pieces by troops under Colonel Sheldon. It was here also that Lord Cornwallis embarked for Fort Lee after the capture of Fort Washington, and here in 1850 Garibaldi, the liberator of Italy, whose centennial was observed July 4, 1907, frequently came to spend the Sabbath and visit friends when he was living at Staten Island. Although there is apparently little to interest in the village, there are many beautiful residences in the immediate neighborhood, and the Old Post road for two miles to the northward furnishes a beautiful walk or driveway, well shaded by old locust trees. The tract of country from Spuyten Duyvil to Hastings was called by the Indians Kekesick and reached east as far as the Bronx River. Dobbs Ferry is now at hand, named after an old Swedish ferryman. The village has not only a delightful location but it is also beautiful in itself. In 1781 it was Washington’s headquarters, and the old house, still standing, is famous as the spot where General Washington and the Count de Rochambeau planned the campaign against Yorktown; where the evacuation of New York was...

From New York City to Yonkers along the Hudson River

This upper landing of the Hudson River Day Line has a beautiful location and is a great convenience to the dwellers of northern Manhattan. On leaving the pier the steel-arched structure of Riverside Drive is seen on the right. The valley here spanned, in the neighborhood of 127th Street, was once known as “Marritje Davids’ Fly,” and the local name for this part of New York above Claremont Heights is still known as “Manhattanville.” The Convent of the Sacred Heart is visible among the trees, and Trinity Cemetery’s Monuments soon gleam along the wooded bank. Among her distinguished dead is the grave of General John A. Dix whose words rang across the land sixty days before the attack on Fort Sumter: “If any man attempts to pull down the American flag shoot him on the spot.” The John A. Dix Post of New York comes hither each Decoration Day and garlands with imposing ceremonies his grave and the graves of their comrades. Near Carmansville was the home of Audubon, the ornithologist, and the residences above the cemetery are grouped together as Audubon Park. Near at hand is the New York Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, and pleasantly located near the shore the River House once known as West-End Hotel. Washington Heights Washington Heights rise in a bold bluff above Jeffrey’s Hook. After the withdrawal of the American army from Long Island, it became apparent to General Washington and Hamilton that New York would have to be abandoned. General Greene and Congress believed in maintaining the fort, but future developments showed that Washington was right. The American troops, so...

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