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Biography of William C. McEntire

WILLIAM C. MCENTIRE. This substantial citizen owes his nativity to the Old North State, where he was born February 5, 1838, a son of Champion and Sarah (Waters) McEntire, both of whom were born in North Carolina in 1806, and on January 10, 1846, landed in Yellville, Arkansas, in which place they lived for one year prior to moving to Bruno. They purchased a claim near this place, and here made their home until the father’s death, March 2, 1879. He was a Union sympathizer during the war, and at that time was a resident in Greene County, Missouri After the war he returned to Arkansas, and prior to his death became the owner of an excellent farm of 238 acres, and was well and favorably known throughout northern Arkansas. He was a public-spirited citizen, and was a member of the Baptist Church, as was his wife who died May 2, 1888. Their children were as follows: John, who died at Salt Lake City many years ago; James was killed while with Price on his Missouri raid; Lawson was killed in the Mountain Meadow Massacre; William C., the subject of this sketch; Joseph, who died in 1873, was a farmer of this county and was a soldier in the Union Army; Rachel D. is the wife of Dr. Elam; and Arch, who is living in this county. The maternal grandfather, John Waters, was a Revolutionary soldier. William C. McEntire came from North Carolina to Arkansas, with his parents, in a wagon, the journey thither occupying about three months. He received a fair education in the common schools, and at...

Biography of G. W. McDowell

This gentleman is one of the oldest and most reliable merchants of Yellville, and is in every way deserving the large patronage which he commands. He has been a resident of the town since 1868, but owes his nativity to the Old Dominion, where he first opened his eyes upon the light April 12, 1832, his parents being Thomas and Rebecca (Lytle) McDowell, the former of whom was born on the Isle of Erin, and came with a brother to the United States about 1800. He-settled in Virginia and his brother in one of the Carolinas, and he became a very wealthy farmer and trader. He was a finely educated gentleman and of unblemished reputation, and left the heritage of an honorable name as well as a goodly property to his descendants. He was born in 1780 and died in 1840. He was married after coming to the United States to a Miss Patton, who bore him five children, two of whom are living: John, of Batesville, Arkansas, and Elizabeth, of Texas. His second mar-riage took place in Virginia, and was to the mother of the subject of this sketch, by whom he became the father of ten children, four now living: Mary, of Summerville, Ore.; G. W.; Cyrus D., who is also in Summerville, Ore.; Virginia, of Howell County, Missouri Four of the others grew up, David, Thomas, Sarah and Missouri, and two died young. None of the sons took part in the Civil War except Cyrus D., who was a soldier in the Union Army. Thomas McDowell emigrated to Missouri in 1835, and after five years’ residence...

Biography of W. C. McBee

There are lines of business in which good management is everything, and to this essential merit, coupled with large experience and accurate judgment, is due the success which has attended the mercantile business of W. C. McBee, of McBee’s Landing, Marion County, Arkansas This wide-awake man of affairs is a native of Mississippi County, Missouri, where he was born August 25, 1848, to S. E. and Lucy (Blackburn) McBee, both of whom were born on Kentucky soil, the former being of Irish lineage, and descended from one who fought for the Colonial cause in the Revolutionary War. S. E. McBee removed to Missouri during the early history of that State, but in 1857 became a resident of Marion County, Ark:, and took up his abode at what was known as Talbert’s Ferry, where he made his home for many years, dying in the neighborhood in 1875, after having spent a useful and honorable life as a farmer and stockman. In antebellum days he was a Whig in politics, during the war was a stanch Union man, but after the close of hostilities he gave his support to the Democrat party, and supported its men and measures up to the time of his death. He was a member of Yellville Lodge of the A. F. & A. M., and became well and favorably known throughout Marion County. His wife died in 1873, after having borne him two sons: W. C., and Vardrey, a resident of Baxter County, Arkansas The early life of W. C. McBee was spent in attending the common schools of this county, and being a young man...

Biography of Judge William Keener

JUDGE WILLIAM KEENER. Success in professional life is cautiously bestowed upon people by the goddess, who, in a measure, guides and invariably decorates man’s efforts. And this success is more apt to come because of the pursuer’s genius or adaptability for his calling than from any other cause. This is particularly the case in law, a profession which Judge William Keener’s talents caused him to adopt when starting out for himself. He is now a prominent attorney at Lead Hill, Arkansas, and United States commissioner for the Western District of the State. Judge Keener came originally from the Keystone State; born in Slate Lick Armstrong County, November 30, 1833. The son of John and Sarah (Hetselgeser) Keener, also natives of that State, the father born in 1804 and the mother in 1821. The grandfather, John Keener, was also a Pennsylvanian by birth and passed his entire life as a farmer in that State. He served his country in the War of 1812. His father, Christian Keener, also a native of Pennsylvania, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The Keener family originated in Switzerland, eleven brothers of that name having emigrated to America at an early day and located in Pennsylvania. Our subject’s maternal grandfather, William Hetselgeser, was a Pennsylvania Dutchman and a wealthy and influential farmer and stockman. He reared a family of fourteen children. His wife’s parents, William and Sarah Beatty, were natives of the Emerald Isle, but came with their parents to America and settled with them in Pennsylvania. The six children born to our subject’s parents, two sons and four daughters, were named as follows:...

Biography of J. H. Berry

This gentleman is one of the oldest residents of Marion County, Arkansas, and through his enterprise, energy and push he has done much to make that section the prosperous region that it is. He was born in Washington County, Virginia, April 26, 1824, being the third of eight children born to Samuel and Sarah (Hickey) Berry, the former of whom was born in Washington County, Virginia, in 1796, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Duff) Berry. William Berry was a Virginian also, but his father, John Berry, was a native of the State of New York, and in his day was in many engagements with the Indians. Elizabeth Duff was born on the ocean when her parents were on their way to this country. In 1843 Samuel Berry emigrated to Missouri, the journey thither bring made in a wagon which he himself had made, and a location was made in what is now Webster County, the father taking up a tract of Government land. In tilling the soil and raising stock he acquired a good property and became a highly-respected and honored citizen. He was a stanch Democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1844 was called to that bourne whence no traveler returns. The maternal grand-parents of the subject of this sketch were William and Rachael Hickey who spent their lives in Virginia, in which State Mrs. Berry was born in 1794, her death occurring in Missouri in 1856. The children she bore were named as follows: William E., who died in 1880, was a soldier in the Confederate service, was circuit clerk of Taney...

Biography of J. E. Wickersham

J. E. WICKERSHAM. The evolutions in the industrial world and the improved modes of manufacturing things have been marvelous in the past half century, and scarcely an industry exists that has been left untouched by the spirit of reform. The demand of the age is for labor-saving machinery, improved tools and appliances, and short cuts generally to desired ends. The general hardware store is an excellent means of supplying the demand. An excellent establishment of this kind is owned by J. E. Wickersham, of Yellville, of which city he is a native. His parents, James and Narcissus (Hamblet) Wickersham, have resided in the vicinity of Yellville for over fifty years, the birth of the former occurring in Marion County, Kentucky, November 1, 1824. His parents were Daniel and Susannah (Martin) Wickersham, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Virginia. The great-grandfather, Samuel Wickersham, was born in the East, but removed to Kentucky at an early day. Daniel and Susannah Wickersham first moved from Kentucky to Indiana, thence to Arkansas in 1848, and engaged in milling and farming in the vicinity of Yellville, accumulating a goodly fortune. When he had reached the age of seventy-five years his house was attacked by robbers, and in order to make him tell where his money was concealed they took him from his home and hung him to a tree, but still he would not tell when let down. He was then left with a guard and the other robbers went to the house to force his wife to tell where the money was concealed, but Mr. Wickersham managed to make...

Biography of Hon. J. C. Floyd

The profession of law is a branch of human endeavor which brings into play the most brilliant talents, the most extensive knowledge, the strongest sentiments, moral, spiritual and material, and its power for good or evil is vast and invincible. In the hands of mean men its practices often become as shameful and despised as its adaptions and usefulness are made, by those inspired with noble principles and generous emotions, sublime and admired. As a legal practitioner whose honor is above criticism, whose ability places him in the front rank of the Arkansas bar, and whose name is widely known and highly respected, is Hon. J. C. Floyd, who is admirably adapted to prosecute this most exalted of professions. He is the able prosecuting attorney of the Fourteenth Judicial District, and is a resident of Yellville, Marion County, Arkansas. He was born in Sparta, Tennessee, April 14, 1858, a son of John W. and Eliza J. (Snodgrass) Floyd, both Tennesseans by birth and bringing up. During Colonial times several brothers of the name of Floyd came to this country from Wales, one settling in Virginia, another in North Carolina and the other in Georgia, the first mentioned being the immediate ancestor of the subject of this sketch. John W. Floyd was in the Confederate service during the war, and was quartermaster of his regiment. In 1869 he came with his family to Benton County, Arkansas, and is now living in Bentonville, retired from the active duties of life. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and is a son of William Floyd, who was also a...

Biography of De Roos Bailey

Of the younger element of our prominent, energetic and influential citizens, none are better known than De Roos Bailey, one of the distinguished attorneys of the northwestern part of Arkansas, whose home is at Harrison. During the years that he has practiced his profession here he has shown that he is endowed with superior ability, and his comprehensive knowledge of the law, together with the soundness of his judgment, secured his almost immediate recognition at the bar. Since that time to the present he has so identified himself with the affairs of his section that its history can-not be recorded without according him a conspicuous and honorable part. He was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, May 27, 1857, and traces his ancestry back to his great-great-grandfather, William Bailey, who came to this country from England many years prior to the Revolution and is supposed to have settled in one of the Carolinas. His son, William, however, was born in Virginia, from which State he enlisted in the Colonial Army during the Revolutionary War, at the age of sixteen years; he died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. John Bailey, the grandfather of De Roos Bailey, was born in the Old North State, and was the first to establish the Bailey family in Tennessee. At a very early day he came with his wife, Beersheba (Cunningham) Bailey, to Arkansas and located on a farm on Crooked Creek, Carroll (now Boone) County, and died in 1876. He and his wife reared the following children: M. J. (Rosson); W. W.; M.. of Walnut Springs, Tex.; Calaway, who died in 1887; Washington,...

Biography of W. R. Jones

The subject of this sketch was born in Wayne County, Illinois, December 1, 1861. His father and mother were born in Illinois; both his grandfathers were born in Kentucky, and his great-grand-father, Cadwaledar Jones, was born in South Carolina. His ancestors took a prominent part in the Revolutionary War, one of them, Robert Anderson, being a chieftain along with Marion and Sumter. The Jones family originally came from Wales. The Anderson family, into which the grandfather of the subject of this sketch married, came from Ireland. The Staten family, into which the father of the subject of this sketch married, were of Scotch-Irish descent. The Statens settled in Kentucky, it is thought near Crab Orchard, in an early day, and the great-grandmother of the subject of this sketch was murdered by the Indians while at a spring doing some washing. The savages cut her all to pieces and hung the remains in a black jack bush. The grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Cadwaledar Jones, left Kentucky and went into Indiana in the year 1808, and settled in what is now Gibson County. He was in the Indian War that came up in 181I , and fired the first shot at the battle of Tippecanoe, he being one of the night sentinels. In 1816 he removed to what is now Wayne County, Illinois, and built the first cabin ever erected in that county. Here, the same year, John Jones, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born, he being the first white child born in that county. In 1835 John Jones left Illinois and emigrated with...

Biography of T. W. Johnson

T. W. JOHNSON. There is no country in the world in which the march of civilization is more noticeable than America, where home life is at the highest ebb of refinement and moral excellence. In every branch of life is this noticeable, the homes in particular showing the delicate touch of the housewife whose keen sense of refinement leads her to command the best and most artistic class of furniture. All classes of furniture may be found at the emporium of T. W. Johnson, who is the largest and only exclusive dealer in furniture and sash and doors in this part of the State. He has been a resident of Harrison since June, 1876, coming from Bellefonte. On first coming to the State he located at Yellville, where he followed the trade of a carpenter for two years. In 1870 he came to this country from Copenhagen, Denmark, landing at Boston; from there he removed to Marshalltown, Iowa, where he worked at his trade one year, then to Grinnel, Iowa, two years, and then came to Arkansas. After coming to Harrison he followed contracting and building for some time and erected many of the most important business buildings and private residences of the place. He is still following this occupation, is a master mechanic, a careful and painstaking workman, and that this fact is realized is shown by the large number of contracts given him. In the fall of 1885 he embarked in the furniture business with a stock worth from $4,000 to $5,000, and his annual sales amounted to from $12,000 to $15,000. When he came to this...
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