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Biography of Preston B. Plumb

In the words of his biographer, Preston B. Plumb was a pioneer in Kansas. He was one of the founders of Emporia. He was in the Union army, and both major and lieutenant-colonel of the Eleventh Kansas. He was long United States senator from Kansas. In the Senate he was one of the men who accomplished things. He was the father of the ides of the conservation of the natural resources of America. It was his law that created the National Forest Reserve and extended aid to irrigation and the reclamation of arid lands. Many of the laws on the national statute books were put there by Preston B. Plumb. He was a great man and a great Kansan. No attempt can be made to cover fully the life of this great Kansan in a brief sketch. Here will be found only those details which are the frame work of biography and some reference to the larger work of which his life was an expression. Preston B. Plumb was born at Berkshire, Delaware County, Ohio, October 12, 1837. His parents, David Plumb and Hannah Maria (Bierce) Plumb, were of old New England families, their respective parents having come as pioneers into Ohio. David Plumb was a wagonmaker. As a boy young Plumb put in part of his time in his father’s shop. At the age of twelve, having made all the progress possible in the schools of Marysville, where the family was living at that time, arrangements were made for him to attend Kenyon College at Gambier, Ohio, a fine old school established and long conducted under the auspices...

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe Bruner, was a better master to his slaves than John. Once when Peter stole some sugar and flour, that he and his sister might have a pound cake, Joe caught him. He did not whip him however, because he knew that Peter did not often have enough to eat. Peter, endured torture as...

Biographical Sketch of Edwin D. Rider

Rider, Edwin D.; milk dealer; born, Navarre, O., Nov. 2, 1884; son of Daniel W. and Isabelle Exline Rider; educated at the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Military School, at Xenia, O.; discharged, June 5, 1901, second sargt.; married, East Bangor, Pa., June 12, 1907, Carrie M. Williams; issue, two daughters, Isabelle and Edith; has been in the dairy business in Cleveland twelve years; four years was associated with The Flood-Pratt Dairy Co.; has been conducting The Model Dairy for eight years; stockholder The Doan Savings & Loan Co.; member of Mayflower Lodge, No. 679, I. O. 0....

Biographical Sketch of Charles Orr

Orr, Charles; investments; born, Xenia, O., 1862; son of John and Henriette Kiloh Orr; married, Xenia, O., Emily L. Currie; book business, Xenia, 1880-1886; same New York, 1886-1889; librarian, Case Library, Cleveland, 1889-1905; director of schools, Cleveland, 1905-1912 (member Board of Education, 1902-1905); investment, 1912 to date; pres. Ohio Library Ass’n, 1897-1899; member State Library Commission, 1898-1911; member American Library Ass’n, American Historical Ass’n, Rowfant Club; pres. Glen Valley...

Biography of Amos S. Lapham

Amos S. Lapham. There are but few members of the bar of Southeastern Kansas who have exceeded the record of Amos S. Lapham, of Chanute, for length and continuity of service, for devotion to the best ethics of the profession and for connection with important litigation. His standing is that of one of the foremost members of the bar of this part of the state. Judge Lapham was born on a farm in Champaign County, Ohio, April 6, 1845, and is a son of Oziel and Mahala (Steere) Lapham, and belongs to one of America’s old and honored families. John Lapham, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Judge Lapham, was born in 1635, in Devonshire, England, and came to America prior to 1673, for on April 6, of that year, he was married at Providence, Rhode Island, to Mary, the daughter of William Mann. He lived at Providence and Newport, Rhode Island, and Dartmouth, Massachusetts. In the same year he was a freeman and deputy to the general assembly, and in 1675 was constable. He owned several hundred acres of land in the vicinity of Providence, but in 1676, at the outbreak of King Philip’s war, removed to Dartmouth, Massachusetts. He was a large landholder for his day, and at the time of his death, in 1710, his estate, of which his wife Mary and son John were executors, was found to be worth $3,000, considered somewhat of a fortune for that time. He had four sons and one daughter. Among his sons was John Lapham, who was born December 13, 1677, in Rhode Island, and died in 1734. He married Mary...

Biography of Ralph M. McKee

Ralph M. McKee is superintendent of the consolidated city schools at Neal in Greenwood County. He is one of the younger men engaged in educational work in Kansas, and had a highly creditable record for the work he had already done and stands high both among his fellow teachers and in his home community. Mr. McKee was born at Xenia, Ohio, December 1, 1893. His McKee ancestors were early settlers in America. Mr. McKee had strains of English and Irish ancestry, and inherits good qualities through both lines. His father, W. T. McKee, was born in Ohio in 1861, and first came to Kansas in 1880. For several years he was engaged in the cattle business about Grenola, and he was married at Concordia that state, where he farmed for several years. Later he returned to Xenia, Ohio, where he resumed farming, and in 1908 came back to Kansas, and had since been a farmer at Elk Falls. He is a democrat in politics. He married Anna E. Liggett, who was born in Ohio in 1862. Of their children, Austin, the oldest, died at Elk Falls, Kansas, at the age of twenty-four, having finished his education in Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. The second in age is Ralph M. and the youngest child is Julia, a graduate of the Howard High School and teaches at Howard, Kansas. Ralph M. McKee received his early training in the public schools at Xenia, Ohio, and in 1913 graduated from the high school at Moline, Kansas. The following year he spent as teacher in a rural school near Howard, the next year was...

Biography of Charles Trader Beatty

Charles Trader Beatty. One of the oldest and most prominent names in the history of Chanute is that of the Beatty family. It was in 1870 that the late John Brooke Beatty established himself at the old Town of Tioga, which had since become a part of the City of Chanute. He erected the first flour mill at that point, was the first hardware dealer in the Town of Tioga, and also an early day mayor. For eleven years he held the office of postmaster at Chanute. John B. Beatty married Maria Whiteman Trader. Of this worthy couple two children survive, Charles Trader Beatty and Miss Helen Beatty, both of Chanute. Charles Trader Beatty was born at Xenia, Ohio, March 25, 1857. He is of old American stock. The genealogy of the Beatty family had been published in complete form in the memoirs of Peter D. Ridenour of Kansas City, Missouri. The Colonial record of the Beattys begins in 1720 with John Beatty of Scotland and his English wife, Susannah Asfordby. Her father, Hon. William Asfordby, became the first sheriff of Ulster County, New York. Of the Beatty family Col. Charles Beatty and Capt. William Beatty were of the First Maryland Regiment in the Revolutionary war. In Colonial times the family was also connected with the Brooke, Grosch and Beall lines. Charles Trader Beatty was a boy when brought to Chanute. He attended public schools there and also at Xenia College in Ohio and in early life he followed merchandising, and subsequently took an active part in the mining, cement and brick manufacturing industries in Southeastern Kansas. He is...

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