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Treaty of August 3, 1829

Articles of agreement made between John M’Elvain, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the band of Delaware Indians, upon the Sandusky River, in the State of Ohio, for the cession of a certain reservation of land in the said State. Article I. The said band of Delaware Indians cede to the United States the tract of three miles square, adjoining the Wyandot Reservation upon the Sandusky River, reserved for their use by the treaty of the Rapids of the Maumee, concluded between the United States and the Wyandots, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnees, Potawatamies, Ottawas, and Chippiwa tribes of Indians, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, and the said tribe of Delawares engage to remove to and join their nation on the west side of the Mississippi, on the land allotted to them, on or before the first day of January next, at which time peaceable possession of said reservation is to be given to the United States. Article II.In consideration of the stipulations aforesaid, it is agreed, that the United States shall pay to the said band the sum of three thousand dollars: two thousand dollars in hand, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged by the undersigned Chiefs of said tribe, and the remaining balance of one thousand dollars to be appropriated to the purchase of horses, clothing, provisions, and other useful articles, to aid them on their journey so soon as they are prepared to remove. In witness whereof, the said John McElvain, and the chiefs of the said band, have...

Treaty of September 29, 1817

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians on the one part; and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawanese, Potawatomees, Ottawas, and Chippeway tribes of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby forever cede to the United States the lands comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point on the southern shore of lake Erie, where the present Indian boundary line intersects the same, between the mouth of Sandusky bay and the mouth of Portage river; thence, running south with said line, to the line established in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, by the treaty of Greenville, which runs from the crossing place above fort Lawrence to Loramie’s store; thence, westerly, with the last mentioned line, to the eastern line of the reserve at Loramie’s store; thence, with the lines of said reserve, north and west, to the northwestern corner thereof; thence to the northwestern corner of the reserve on the river St. Mary’s, at the head of the navigable waters thereof; thence, east, to the western bank...

Treaty With The Delaware, August 3, 1829

Articles of agreement made between John M’Elvain, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the band of Delaware Indians, upon the Sandusky River, in the State of Ohio, for the cession of a certain reservation of land in the said State. Article 1. The said band of Delaware Indians cede to the United States the tract of three miles square, adjoining the Wyandot reservation upon the Sandusky river, reserved for their use by the treaty of the Rapids of the Maumee, concluded between the United States and the Wyandots, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnees, Potawatamies, Ottawas, and Chippiwa tribes of Indians, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, and the said tribe of Delawares engage to remove to and join their nation on the west side of the Mississippi, on the land allotted to them, on or before the first day of January next, at which time peaceable possession of said reservation is to be given to the United States. Article 2. In consideration of the stipulations aforesaid, it is agreed, that the United States shall pay to the said band the sum of three thousand dollars: two thousand dollars in hand, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged by the undersigned Chiefs of said tribe, and the remaining balance of one thousand dollars to be appropriated to the purchase of horses, clothing, provisions, and other useful articles, to aid them on their journey so soon as they are prepared to remove. In witness whereof, the said John McElvain, and the chiefs of the said band,...

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