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Descendants of Francis Brayton of Fall River, MA

BRAYTON. The first in America by this name, one Francis Brayton, came from England to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where, in 1643, he was received as an inhabitant, in 1655, became a freeman, and to him nearly if not all the Braytons of New England trace their origin. He early entered into the political life of the country, serving as a member of the General Court of Commissioners for the Colony, for many years as member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and frequently during the later generations his descendants have held positions of responsibility and trust in the public offices of State and the private offices of the business world. The name is found on the rolls of the United States Army and Navy, and on the professional records of the clergy, the physician, and the lawyer. This article, however, is confined to one of the branches of the family several of whose members chose the commercial world for their sphere and through which, during the phenomenal growth of Fall River’s industrial life, the name of Brayton became prominent and influential. In 1714, Preserved Brayton, grandson of Francis, purchased 138 acres of land from William Little, whose father was one of the proprietors of the ShawomeOKt Purchase in Swanzey, Massachusetts. This farm, since known as the Brayton Homestead, borders on the west bank of the Taunton river and is located in the present town of Somerset, which, in 1790, was set apart from Swanzey (now spelled Swansea). Preserved had already married Content Coggeshall, the granddaughter of John Coggeshall, whose name is handed down in history as that of a...

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son of James M., being now active and prominent in the same line of operation the father followed, is treasurer of the American Linen Company and Merchants’ Manufacturing Company and president of the Covel & Osborn Company, dealers in hardware and mill supplies. This Osborn family here treated is one of at least a century and three quarters’ standing in Rhode Island and the nearby part of Massachusetts. Still earlier than the beginning of the period just named there is a record of the family of Jeremiah and Mercy Osband at Bristol, now R. I., as early as 1684, the date of birth of their first child. Their children were: Robert Osband, born Aug. 11, 1684; Katherine Osband, born Nov. 12, 1686; John Osband, born Oct. 12, 1689; Jeremiah Osband, born July 25, 1693; Margaret Osband, born May 27, 1695; Sarah Osband, born May 11, 1701; Jeremiah Osband (2), born June 11, 1706. One Nathaniel Osband petitioned the General Court at its May session, held at Newport, 1682. So far as has...

Timothy Fuller

TIMOTHY FULLER, the fourth child and eldest son of Timothy Fuller Sr., attained distinction. The chief steps in his career may be thus summarily stated: He was born in Chilmark, Martha’s Vineyard, 11th of July, 1778; grad. at Harvard College with the second honors in his class, 1801. He was obliged to work his way through college, and be absent much in teaching; but such were his talent, industry, and scholarship, that it is believed he would have borne off the first honors bad he not countenanced a rebellion of the students, caused by certain college rules regarded as oppressive. He was always an ardent advocate for freedom and the rights of man, and even while in college made himself marked as a Democratic Republican, in contradistinction to the Federalists. After graduating, he taught in Leicester Academy, till he had acquired funds to complete his professional study of the law, which he did in the office of Hon. Levi Lincoln, of Worcester, and afterwards practiced law in Boston. He was a member of the Mass. Senate from 1813 to 1816; Representative in Congress from 1817 to 1825; Speaker of the Mass. House of Representatives in 1825; a member of the Executive Council in 1828; and died suddenly of Asiatic cholera, at his residence in Groton, Mass., October 1, 1835. Mr Fuller’s published writings are, “An Oration delivered at Watertown, July 4, 1809; ” “Address before the Massachusetts Peace Society, 1826; ” “The Election for the Presidency considered, by a Citizen; ” Speeches on the Seminole War, Missouri Compromise, &c. Hon. Timothy Fuller married Margaret Crane, daughter of Maj. Peter...

Biographical Sketch of Michael F. Healy

Michael F. Healy is a San Mateo County pioneer who has proved his confidence in the county and particularly in South San Francisco by the investment of his fortune in that city. Healy has resided in San Mateo county for 24 years, most of them being spent in South San Francisco where he is now the owner of a large grocery business and many other interests. Since coming to South San Francisco Mr. Healy has engaged in many lines of business. ‘He was best known as a lumber man, his yards supplying lumber and building material to South San Francisco and many of the surrounding towns. He has now retired from this business and is devoting his time to the large grocery store of which he is the proprietor. Mr. Healy has always taken an active interest in civic and municipal affairs. During his long residence in South San Francisco there has never been a general welfare movement in which he has not been a leader. He recently completed a term as city trustee and while in this office he was an indefatigable worker for South San Francisco. Michel F. Healy was born in County Claire, Ireland in June, 1852. After emigrating to America he spent some time in Worcester, Mass., where he was married in 1872. He brought his bride to California where he has resided for the past thirty-four years. Mr. Healy is a member of the...

Biography of Josiah Edwards Dwight

Josiah Edwards Dwight, a member of the noted old New England family to which President Timothy Dwight of Yale College belonged, is one of the leading Concord, N.H. Born in Belchertown, Mass., May 17, 1839, son of Harrison D. and Sophia (Cook) Dwight, he traces his lineage through his mother, also, back to the early days of the New England colonies. On the paternal side his first ancestor to settle in this country was John Dwight, who came from Dedham, England, in 1634, and located in the part of Massachusetts afterward named Dedham. He was the second man of wealth in the settlement, and with eighteen others owned the land comprising later the town of Dedham and about nine surrounding towns. His daughter Mary was the first white child born in the town of Dedham. John Dwight’s son Timothy, from whom the subject of this sketch is directly descended, was born in Dedham, England, in 1629. He inherited the estate and virtues of his father, and was one of the prominent men of his day. A sturdy soldier, he was cornet of a troop in his younger days, and was afterward commander of a company of foot, and is commonly alluded to as Captain Timothy Dwight. His title was no empty honor, for he was engaged in ten expeditions against the Indians; and in 1660 he was one of two agents appointed to treat with the Indians, which they did with satisfactory results. He was for ten years Town Clerk of Dedham, twenty-five years Selectman, and two years Representative to the General Court. Captain Dwight is said to have...

Biography of Henry Harrison Edwards

Henry Harrison Edwards, a watchmaker of acknowledged ability, who is now residing in Allenstown, was born in Laconia, N.H., July 28, 1840, son of Nathaniel and Rachel (Ranlett) Edwards. His grandfather, Ebenezer Edwards, who in his earlier years followed the sea, subsequently learned the hatter’s trade, and followed it in Laconia for many years. Another source of income to him was the Martha Watson, a native of Dover, N.H., who also died at the age of sixty-eight. Of their eleven children David, William, Charles, Eben, Mary, and Pierpont are living. Nathaniel Edwards, father of Henry H., was born in Plymouth, N.H., December 7, 1813. He learned the shoemaker’s trade in New Market, N.H., and followed it for several years in his native town. Later he became assistant superintendent of the Lake Water Company. In politics he was originally a Whig, and later became a Republican. He served as Tax Collector for some time, and was Chief of the Fire Department for a number of years. In his latter years he attended the Baptist church. He died at the age of seventy-two years. His wife, Rachel, who is a native of Gilmanton, N.H., became the mother of three sons-George W., Henry H., and Frank A. George W., now deceased, married for his first wife Miss Lawton, of Pittsfield, Mass., who had no children. His second wife, Ida Mills Edwards, of Williamstown, Mass., now resides in Pittsfield, Mass., with her two children-George W. and Blanche. Frank A. married Nellie Tilletson, of Whitefield, N.H., and his children are: Frank, Nathaniel H., Louise, and Jessie. Mrs. Nathaniel Edwards, now eighty-four years old, is...

Biography of Charles Gilkey

Charles Gilkey, a prominent resident of Cornish, who was formerly engaged in the gunsmith business, is a native of Plainfield, N.H., born September 29, 1826. Charles Gilkey, his grandfather, born in Connecticut, was the first of the family to come to Plainfield. He came originally as agent of a wealthy Connecticut family, and remained in their employ for some time. After failing in an attempt to buy a farm with the Continental money in which his salary was paid, owing to the depreciated value of that currency then, he succeeded in leasing one from the State for nine hundred and ninety-nine years. This property is still in the possession of the family, subject to an annual rental of six or eight dollars, which is paid to the treasurer of the Episcopal church of the town. Grandfather Gilkey married Lucy Avery, who bore him five children-Jonathan, John, Charles, William, and James. Jonathan married a Miss Spaulding, and lived in Vermont. John married and spent his life in Vermont, working at the trade of ship-carpenter. He had one daughter, who married the Rev. Robert Christie. Charles was drowned when a young man. William died young. James Gilkey, the father of Charles Gilkey, a native of Connecticut, born in September, 1769, came to Cornish when about seven years old. By trade he was a mechanical woodcutter, in which he carried on a large business for some time. After the death of his brother Charles he took charge of the farm. Highly esteemed in the community, he served in every office in the gift of the town, including that of legislative Representative. He...

Richard Wait Genealogy

Richard Wait Richard1 Wait, b. at Watertown, Mass., 1637; farmer in Watertown; m. Mary ; d. at Watertown, Jan. 16, 1668-9; wid. Mary d. at Watertown, Jan. 21, 1678. Thomas Wait Thomas2 Wait, b. at Watertown, March 3, 1641-2; m. Sarah, dau. of James Cutler of Lexington, Mass. Thomas Wait was a farmer; d. at Weston, Mass., Jan. 3, 1722-3; wid. Sarah d. at Weston, Jan. 17, 1743-4, aged 91. Joseph Wait Joseph3 Wait, b. at Watertown, Feb. 4, 1682-3; m. Sarah, wid. of Joseph Stone; in Sudbury, Mass., 1715; constable 1735; removed to Worcester, Mass., 1743; d. at Worcester, Oct. 5, 1753; wid. Sarah d. at Worcester, April 24, 1754. John Wait John4 Wait, b. at Watertown; bap. at Watertown, Sept. 26, 1708; m. first at Watertown, 1727-8, Hannah Wellington, d. before March 17, 1764, the date on which John Wait m. second, Eunice Morse of Sherborn, Mass., dau. of John and Hannah [Morse] Wellington, descended from Roger’ Wellington, “Planter,” selectman at Watertown seven years. He m. Mary, dau. of Dr. Richard Palgrave of Charlestown, Mass. John Wait removed to Brookfield, Mass., 1746, having bought a farm of 300 acres on Foster’s Hill. He was a veteran in the Indian Wars. Five of his sons were officers in the Revolutionary War. He d. at Brookfield, Jan. 27, 1761. See Temple’s North Brookfield for explicit information of the service of the five sons as officers. Benjamin Wait Benjamin5 Wait, b. at Sudbury, Mass., Feb. 13, 1736; mfirst, Jan. 11, 1767, Lois Gilbert, dau. of Capt. Thomas and Martha [Barnes] Gilbert of Brookfield. She d. at Waitsfield, Vt., April 3,...

Pompey Woodward Genealogy

Pompey Woodward, a negro, who did not know his age or parentage, had served in the Revolution as a waiter to some officer. He came to Sullivan, after his second m. He m (1), in Sterling, Mass., Apr. 15, 1788, Rosanna Hendley; both were of Sterling, Probably their last names were those of families where they had been employed. Feb. 16, 1800, he was published to Miss Polly (Mary) Harry of Worcester, Mass. He d. Jan. 13, 1843. In the Sentinel of Feb. 1, 1843, is the following obituary: “In Sullivan, Pompey Woodward, a colored man, aged 77. He had been a professor of religion for a great number of years, and died a Revolutionary pensioner, always maintaining a character for strict integrity, and was highly respected by his neighbors.” Mrs. Polly Woodward d. in Worcester, Mass., July 28, 1856, aged 95, according to the records of Worcester; and the records say she was b. Southboro, Mass. They do not give her parentage or...
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