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Biographical Sketch of William B. Blackburn

One of the first resident lawyers of Hopkinsville, and one of the able men of the State, was William B. Blackburn. He came from Woodford County about 1799, a young lawyer just admitted to the bar. He remained four or five years, and during his stay made his home in the family of Bartholomew Wood, the pioneer of Hopkinsville. What his success was while practicing law here is not known, as there is no one here now who knew him then, and it is only through Col. Buckner, of Louisville, who served in the Legislature with him many years later that any facts of him have been obtained. He finally returned to Woodford County probably about 1803, and for years was a prominent lawyer and politician there. He served in the Lower House of the Legislature from 1804 to 1816 inclusive, with the exception of 1808-09-10; and from 1825 to 1828 inclusive. He served in the Senate in 1818-20, 1822-24, and 1832-34, and was an active member throughout his long term of service. He was a brother to Dr. Churchill Blackburn, of Covington, Kentucky, and a cousin of Edward M. Blackburn-the father of ex-Governor, and of Senator Joe Blackburn. He died about 1842 at his home in Woodford...

Slave Narrative of Julia Bowman

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Julia Bowman Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Woodford County KY Date of Birth: 1850 Place of Residence: 1210 North West Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. JULIA BOWMAN-EX-SLAVE 1210 North West Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Bowman was born in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1859. Her master, Joel W. Twyman was kind and generous to all of his slaves, and he had many of them. The Twyman slaves were always spoken of, as the Twyman “Kinfolks.” All slaves worked hard on the large farm, as every kind of vegetation was raised. They were given some of everything that grew on the farm, therefore there was no stealing to get food. The master had his own slaves, and the mistress had her own slaves, and all were treated very kindly. Mrs. Bowman was taken into the Twyman “big house,” at the age of six, to help the mistress in any way she could. She stayed in the house until slavery was abolished. After freedom, the old master was taken very sick and some of the former slaves were sent for, as he wanted some of his “Kinfolks” around him when he died. Interviewer’s Comment Mrs. Bowman was given the Twyman family bible where her birth is recorded with the rest of the Twyman family. She shows it with pride. Mrs. Bowman said she never knew want in slave times, as she has known it in these times of depression. Submitted January 10, 1938 Indianapolis,...

Slave Narrative of Sarah H. Locke

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah H. Locke Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Woodford County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1859 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH H. LOCKE-DAUGHTER [of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor] Mrs. Locke, the daughter of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1859. She went over her early days with great interest. Jacob Keephart, her master, was very kind to his slaves, would never sell them to “nigger traders.” His family was very large, so they bought and sold their slaves within the families and neighbors. Mrs. Locke’s father, brothers, and grandmother belonged to the same master in Henry County, Kentucky. Her mother and the two sisters belonged to another branch of the Keephart family, about seven miles away. Her father came to see her mother on Wednesday and Saturday nights. They would have big dinners on these nights in their cabin. Her father cradled all the grain for the neighborhood. He was a very high tempered man and would do no work when angry; therefore, every effort was made to keep him in a good humor when the work was heavy. Her mother died when the children were very young. Sarah was given to the Keephart daughter as a wedding present and taken to her new home. She was always treated like the others in the family. After the abolition of slavery, Mr Keephart gave Wm. a horse and rations to last for six months, so the children would not starve. Charles and Lydia French, fellow workers...

Slave Narrative of George Henderson

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: George Henderson Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Woodford County, Kentucky Date of Birth: May 10, 1860 Garrard County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Eliza Ison) [HW: Ky 13] Interview with George Henderson: Uncle George tells me that he was born May 10, 1860 near Versailles, in Woodford County, Kentucky. His father’s name was Bradford Henderson, who was a slave of Milford Twiman who belonged to the Cleveland family. He does not know where his family came from. There were 21 children including two or three sets of twins. All died while young, except his brothers: Milford, Sam, and Joe; and sisters: Elle and Betsy. All the slaves lived in log cabins and there were about 30 or 40 of them on a plantation of 400 acres. “The cabin I was born in had four rooms, two above and two below. The rooms above were called lofts, and we climbed up a ladder to get to these rooms. We slept on trundle-beds, which were covered with straw ticks. Our covers were made in big patches from old cast-off clothes. When we got up in the morning we shoved the trundle bed back under the big bed. Some boy would ring a great big bell, called the “farm bell” about sunrise. Some went to the stables to look after the horses and mules. Plowing was done with a yoke or oxen. The horses were just used for carriages and to ride. My work was pulling weeds, feeding chickens, and helping to take care of the pigs. Marse Cleveland had a very bad male hog and had to keep him...

Biographical Sketch of William Harper

William Harper, one of the oldest men in Lake County, is the son of John and Elizabeth (Weaver) Harper; they were both probably born in Pennsylvania; they married, and made their home in Kentucky. They had three sons, but one of them living; they both belonged to the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Harper was a farmer, and in politics a Whig. Mrs. Harper lived to be sixty five years old, and he was eighty seven; his ancestors were Dutch. William Harper was born June 10, 1807, in Woodford County, Kentucky At the age of sixteen, he accepted a position as salesman in his brother’s store, but a few years later returned to farming. In 1846 he married Frances N. McGehee, born December 19, 1832; they had no children, and the following year she died. In 1848 he married Sarah H. Tittesworth; she was born November 21, 1832, and died in 1880. They had seven children, five living. Mrs. Harper was a Methodist. Mr. Harper was a Whig before the war, and a democrat since. In 1855 he moved to Madrid Bend. He owns 400 acres of fine land. In 1875 he moved to California on account of his wife’s health, but, as it failed to benefit her, they returned to Madrid Bend. He has been a resident of the county for thirty years, and is now in his eightieth year. His life has been a long and useful one, and he retains the confidence of...

Biography of Carlyle L. Pelot

It is worthy of note that a majority of the pioneers of Idaho Falls were young, or comparatively young, men. They did not come to mold a new community in accordance with antiquated precedents which had been worn out elsewhere. They came open-eyed, susceptible to conviction, ready to take conditions as they existed and shape them according to the logic of the time and the place. How they succeeded, every one knows who knows anything of the history of the town. One of the most far-sighted of these pioneers was the man whose name appears above; and it is the purpose of the writer to give a brief account of his antecedents, his life and his successes to the present time. Carlyle L. Pelot descended from French ancestry. His grandparents in the paternal line came to America at an early day and located at Savannah, Georgia. There Frank L. Pelot, father of Carlyle, our subject, was born. He married Miss Bettie Carlyle, a native of Kentucky. In 1856 they removed to Missouri and settled near Blackburn, in Salem County, where Mr. Pelot became a successful farmer. He is yet living, aged seventy. His wife died in her sixtieth year. Their son, Carlyle L., was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, May 18, 1854. He was two years old when his parents located in Missouri, and there he was educated in the public schools and brought up to the life of a farmer and stockbreeder, and also was taught all the arts of horse-taming, etc. Twenty years ago a change of climate was prescribed for him, and he sought a broader...

Biographical Sketch of Frederick B. Ayer

Ayer, Frederick B.; insurance; born, Unity, N. H., Oct. 27, 1874; son of Benjamin F. and Susan V. Bailey Ayer; educated, Preparatory School Kenyon Military Academy, Gambier, O., 1890-91; Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., class of 1896, degree A. B.; married, Ashtabula, O., June 15, 1899, Agnes Louise Goddard; issue, Edwin, born Aug. 2, 1901, Ethel Louise, born Jan. 22, 1905, Margaret, born Nov. 11, 1906; taught school at Kenyon Military Academy Sept., 1896 to June, 1899; principal of school at Versailles, Ky., from Sept., 1899 to May, 1903; May 1, 1903, became associated with Fred P. Thomas in insurance business in Cleveland; vice pres. and director The Fred P. Thomas Co.; member Chamber of Commerce; Delta Upsilon fraternity. Recreations: Tennis, baseball and...

Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Woodford County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Woodford County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Census Transcription Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Woodford County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Woodford County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1860 Woodford...

Woodford County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Woodford County Woodford County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Woodford County USGenWeb Archives Project Beverly Allen Cemetery James McConnell Family Cemetery Midway Cemetery Pisgah Presbyterian Church Cemetery Slatten-Carter-Thompson Cemeteries Versailles Cemetery Woodford County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Woodford County USGenWeb Archives Project Midway Cemetery Rose Crest Cemetery Singleton Hill Cemetery Steele Cemetery Sunset Memorial Gardens Cemetery Versailles Cemetery...

Biographical Sketch of George H. Carlyle

George H. Carlyle one of Westminster’s successful dairymen, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, March 23, 1827. His father moved to Saline County, Missouri, in 1855, and followed farming there until his death twelve years ago. He had nine children. For several years George (or Henry, as he was generally known) was connected with the stage line under Ben. Holiday, from the Missouri river to Fort Kearney and Salt Lake City. After this he followed farming and the dairy business at Independence, Missouri, until he came to California in 1887. Buying eighty acres of land in the Westminster colony, he is now raising fruits, fine Jersey cattle, and also carrying on the dairy business. Politically Mr. Carlyle is a Democrat, and religiously he is a member of the Christian Church, of which for several years he has been an elder, at Santa Ana. In 1868 he married Arnie Fackler, of Missouri, and a daughter of Dr. J. M. Fackler, of Kansas City. Their children are: Virgie, John, Frankie, Lutie and George...
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