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Slave Narrative of Millie Simpkins

Person Interviewed: Millie Simpkins Location: Nashville, Tennessee Age: 109 Place of Residence: 1004 10th Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee “Black Mamie” I claims I’s 109 ye’ars ole en wuz bawn neah Winchester, Tennessee. Mah marster wuz Boyd Sims en mah missis wuz Sarah Ann Ewing Sims. Mah mammy wus named Judy Ewing en mah daddy wuz Moses Stephens en he wus “free bawn.” He wuz de marster’s stable boy en followed de races. He run ‘way en nebber kum back. Mah fust missis wuz very rich. She had two slave ‘omen ter dress her eve’y mawnin’ en I brought her breakfust ter her on a silvah waitah. She wuz ma’ied three times, her second husband wuz Joe Carter en de third wuz Judge Gork. Mah fust missis sold me kaze I wuz stubborn. She sent me ter de “slave yard” at Nashville. De yard wuz full ob slaves. I stayed dere two weeks ‘fore marster Simpson bought me. I wuz sold ‘way fum mah husband en I nebber se’d ‘im ‘gin. I had one chile which I tuk wid me. De slave yard wuz on Cedar Street. A Mr. Chandler would bid de slaves off, but ‘fore dey started biddin’ you had ter tek all ob yo Clothes off en roll down de hill so dey could see dat you didn’t hab no bones broken, er sores on yer. (I wouldin’ tek mine off). Ef nobody bid on you, you wuz tuk ter de slave mart en sold. I wuz sold dere. A bunch ob dem wuz sent ter Mississippi en dey had dere ankles fas’end tergedder en dey had ter...

Biography of Hon. W.W. Gordon

Hon. W. W. Gordon was born in Winchester, Tennessee, May 20, 1848. His father, Dr. Amzi B. Gordon, was a native of the county of Bedford, moving to Franklin County in about the year 1841, where he began the practice of medicine, soon building up a large and lucrative practice. He was a zealous member of the Baptist Church and one of the founders of the celebrated Mary Sharp College, at Winchester. He died in 1855. His mother is a daughter of John March, a highly respected farmer of the county, and a sister of Hon. Hayden March, who represented Franklin County several times in the Legislature. Mr. Gordon received only the rudiments of an English education at Carrick Academy, in his native town, the suspension of the schools during the five years of war depriving him, as it did thousands of the youth of the south, of the means of obtaining an education. He entered a printing office during the war, partly for the educational advantages thus offered, but principally for the meager salary thereby obtained for the support of his widowed mother and sister. He moved to Nashville soon after the war, working in the various departments of the newspaper offices of that city. He spent several years in visiting the principal cities of the Union. In 1870 he was married to Miss Mary E. Fletcher, daughter of G. G. and Ann Fletcher, of Shelbyville, Tennessee. He has but one child, Russell W., born in 1871. In 1874 he moved to Lynchburg, Moore County, and in April of that year established the Sentinel, continuing its publication for...

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