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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Charles A. Kingsbury

Rev. Charles A. Kingsbury, of Redlands, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, in 1839, the third of a family of five children. His father, Isaac Kingsbury, was a market gardener for a period of fifty years. The subject of this sketch was educated at Williams College, and also graduated at the Union Theological Seminary, in New York City, in 1867. After his graduation he filled two pastorates in the Congregational Church. In 1875 he married Miss Mary Augusta Donaldson, a native of New York City. They have one son: Homer Penfield Donaldson Kingsbury. Mr. Kingsbury came to California in 1889 on account of failing health, and has located in Redlands, on what is known as Redlands Heights. He has a most beautiful residence, commanding one of the finest views in Southern California, overlooking the whole San Bernardino...

Biography of Wallace E. Stoddard

WALLACE E. STODDARD – The internal and administrative work of a large business concern is a section of the organization of such paramount importance and so vital to the success of an enterprise that specially trained and very capable men find secure and remunerative posts as secretaries, cashiers, bookkeepers, in addition having the consciousness of contributing in their own effective and indispensable way to the well-being and prosperity of the business. A man whose services in an administrative capacity and as supervisor of labor and finances has always been much appreciated by the concerns with which he has been connected, and who now holds several positions of trust is Wallace E. Stoddard. Wallace E. Stoddard is a native of Vernon, Vermont, where he was born on January 3, 1872, a son of Faith W. and Sarah Augusta (Allen) Stoddard. He received his first education in the public schools of his native town, in Brattleboro High School, Brattleboro, Vermont, and in Eastman’s Business College. After completing his education he started his business career with the Draper Corporation in Hopedale, Massachusetts, where he acted in the capacity of paymaster. His later positions were with the Williamstown Manufacturing Company, the North Pownal Vermont Manufacturing Company, in charge of their offices; as superintendent of the Greylock Mills; secretary to W. B. & C. T. Plunkett; purchasing agent of the Berkshire Cotton Manufacturing Company; assistant treasurer of the Berkshire Cotton Manufacturing Company, and treasurer of the Silver Creek Company, Belzoni, Mississippi. In all these positions Mr. Stoddard has given excellent proof of his superior capacity for administrative and painstaking, conscientious attention to detail and...

Biography of George Brown Waterman

GEORGE BROWN WATERMAN, postmaster of Williamstown, is a descendant of an old and prominent Massachusetts family, his paternal great-grandfather, John Waterman, who was born in Coventry, Rhode Island, May 18, 1755, came to Cheshire, Massachusetts, in the latter part of 1776 or 1777. During the first and second years of the Revolutionary War he was a sailor or privateersman annoying the commerce of Great Britain. After coming to Massachusetts he made his home for two years in the family of Captain Daniel Brown, remaining there in the absence of the captain while he was in command of his company at the Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777. Mr. Waterman was enrolled as a minute man. In 1803 he moved to his farm adjoining the village of North Adams. During his youth he had received but a limited education, but he became one of the best informed men of his day, and was fortunate in numbering among his friends such men as Dr. William Towner, who practiced medicine in Cheshire before his removal to Williamstown, and Elder John Leland. Mr. Waterman served as a delegate from Adams to the State convention of 1820, for amending the constitution of Massachusetts, and previous to that time had been a member of the legislature. He was of a social disposition, and was kind to the poor and unfortunate. He moved to Williamstown in 1829, and his death occurred there May 28, 1830, at the good old age of seventy-five years. He married, about 1780, Anna Hall, a native of Stafford, Connecticut, and they were the parents of eight children all born in Cheshire,...

Biography of Edgar Cotrell

EDGAR COTRELL AN Albanian, widely and favorably known as a representative man, who has contributed largely toward the development of a special industry in our city, is Edgar Cotrell of the firm of Cotrell & Leonard, extensive wholesale and retail dealers in furs and kindred goods. It is always interesting to trace the ancestry and personal career of any one whom, by earnest, persevering and honorable efforts, has obtained marked and permanent success in some useful calling or profession in life. In the subject of the present sketch we have an illustration of some of the more striking characteristics of New England men and their descendants. He is a son of the late Joshua G. Cotrell, a native of Massachusetts, who was born in 1804, and who, in 1836, married Cornelia, daughter of Dr. Jabez Wilkinson. Joshua G. Cotrell was a man of great pluck, enterprise and high character, who at the age of twenty-two came to Albany and established, on a small scale, the business which is now so largely and successfully carried on by his son Edgar and the Messrs. Leonard. His death, which occurred in 1878, was deeply lamented, while his name is still highly cherished by many of our citizens. The grandfather of Edgar Cotrell, on his father’s side, was Oliver Cotrell, of Hancock, Berkshire County, Mass., who married Mary, daughter of Nathaniel Gardner, a descendant of Samuel Sewall, the companion and friend of Miles Standish. His great-grandfather was Joseph Cotrell, of Wickford, R. I., who married Hannah, daughter of Judge Nichols, a resident of Newport, R. I., during the revolutionary war, in 1780, and...

Biography of Dr. Vanderpoel Adriance

DR. VANDERPOEL ADRIANCE – The enormously increased demand for medical personnel of high character, especially well-trained physicians, and the vital importance of securing an adequate number of such men, caused the United States Government, during the World War, to enter into temporary contracts with leading physicians all over the country to secure their exclusive services. One of the surgeons who thus found himself incorporated in the vast machinery which was to lead the American and Allied forces to victory over a stubborn and redoubtable foe was Dr. Vanderpoel Adriance, a practicing surgeon of Williamstown. A native of New York City, born May 13, 1869, a son of John Adriance, a lawyer, and Lucy Whitman (Sabin) Adriance. Dr. Adriance received his first education in the public schools of Williamstown, and then entered the Greylock Institute of South Williamstown, graduating from there in 1886. He afterwards attended Williams College, and in 1890 took the Bachelor of Arts degree from that institution. Having passed all his preliminary studies he began his professional preparation by matriculating as a student of the famous College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, which is the Medical Department of Columbia University, taking his professional degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1893. From 1896 to 1907 he practiced in New York City, and from 1908 to 1924 in Williamstown, where he also holds the position of trustee of the Williamstown Savings Bank. In politics Dr. Adriance is a member of the Republican party, but has never had time or inclination to aspire to political offices. In religion he is a member and attendant of the First...

Biography of Gilbert Milligan Tucker

GILBERT MILLIGAN TUCKER ONE of the most earnest, active and successful journalistic workers in Albany is Gilbert M. Tucker, one of the editors and proprietors of the Cultivator and Country Gentleman. He was born in Albany on the 26th of August, 1847, is a son of the late Luther Tucker, who, in the year 1831, established the old Genesee Farmer, now consolidated with the Cultivator and Country Gentleman. The elder Mr. Tucker, dying in 1873, left the management of the paper to his two sons, Luther H. and Gilbert M, The eldest son, Luther, is still at the head of the firm, while, during recent years, Gilbert has been the principal active member most of the time. The other son in this gifted family is Willis G. Tucker, the well-known physician and scientist of this city, a biographical sketch of whom is included in the present series. Gilbert M. Tucker, the subject of this sketch, inheriting the high literary abilities of his father, early evinced a great desire to lay out for himself a purely literary career. When about ten years of age he was sent to the Albany Boys’ academy, where he spent several years, and in 1865, at the age of eighteen, he had the satisfaction of entering the junior class of Williams College, Massachusetts. Applying himself with renewed ardor to his books, he was graduated in 1867, with honor, standing second in his class. During his college life Mr. Tucker paid special attention to English composition, and thus early laid the foundation of his terse, vigorous style; and after graduation it was with comparative ease that...

Biography of Fred M. Myers

FRED M. MYERS – The large service to his profession that Mr. Myers has rendered during his practice of the law, which has been for the most part at Pittsfield, has requited him with such returns as satisfactory clientage, and thorough and skillful performance of duty secure for their devotee. As a general practitioner, and in his present popular partnership, Mr. Myers is accorded place with the advancing group of attorneys in this part of the State who grace and honor their profession with unvarying maintenance of established high standards. He is a son of Henry W. and Jennie M. Myers, his father now being retired from business. Fred M. Myers was born April 15, 1888, at Pownal, Vermont. His elementary education was received in the public and high schools of Bennington, Vermont, and taking the liberal arts course at college, he graduated second in his class at Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts in 1909, and with his Bachelor of Arts degree. Preparing himself for his vocation in the law, he then graduated at the Harvard University Law School in the class of 1912, and was admitted to practice at the bar, the same year. Mr. Myers entered into the practice of his profession in the office of Clarence P. Niles, at North Adams, in 1912, and he there continued until 1913, when Mr. Niles and he removed to Pittsfield. He continued to practice law in association with Mr. Niles until the death of the latter in December, 1915. During a part of this time Mr. Niles was district attorney for the Western District of Massachusetts, and Mr. Myers served...

Biography of Rev. Cushing Eels, D. D.

REV. CUSHING EELS, D.D. – Dr. Eells was born at Blandford, Massachusetts, February 16, 1810, and was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Warner) Eells. He was descended from Samuel Eells, who was a major in Cromwell’s army, and who came to America in 1661. Cushing Eells was brought up at Blandford, became a Christian when fifteen years old, prepared for college at Monson Academy, Massachusetts, entered Williams College in 1830, and graduated four years later. The distance from his home to college was forty-five miles. Twice he rode the entire distance, – when he entered and after he graduated, – twice from one-half to two-thirds of the way; and the rest of the trips he walked too poor to pay his way. Three years later he graduated from East Windsor Theological Seminary, of Connecticut (now at Hartford), and was ordained at Blandford, Massachusetts, October 25, 1837, as a Congregational minister. While teaching school at Holden, Massachusetts, he became acquainted with Miss Myra Fairbank, to whom he was afterwards married. She was the daughter of Dea. Joshua, and Mrs. Sally Fairbank, and was born at Holden, Massachusetts, May 26, 1805. It is said that both on her father’s and mother’s sides she was pure Yankee. She made a profession of religion when thirteen years old, and at the celebration of her seventieth birthday said that she had never been sorry that she had begun to serve the Savior when so young. When Doctor Eels first offered himself as a missionary to the American board of commissioners for foreign missions, he was appointed to the Zulu mission of Africa. Afterwards,...
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