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Biography of H. A. Hansen

H.A. HANSEN. – Among the enterprising and industrious agriculturists of Union county, mention should be made of the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, since his energy and ability have been manifest to all and since he has distinguished himself by his faithfulness and success that he has attained in tilling the soil and in raising stock. He is also popular among his fellows for they have again and again manifested their confidence in him at the polls and have kept him in public office almost continuously for the last decade. The pleasant little Kingdom of Denmark has furnished many thrifty citizens for our country, but none more faithful and deserving than he, who was born there in 1842, the subject of this sketch. At the early age of fourteen years, Mr. Hansen started out for himself and soon was farming and until he was thirty years of age he continued at this industry. At the age last mentioned he left the native land and embarked for the United States, where he made his way to the vicinity of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and engaged there in saw mill work, for two and one-half years. After this period, he went to Kansas, locating in Wilson county, where he worked in a livery stable for five years and farmed for two years and then came to the Sound country in Washington and remained at Whatcom for one year. From there he migrated to the Grande Ronde country and in this valley he rented a farm which he worked for three years and then he took up a piece of land eight...

Vanishing Towns and Old Settlements of Washington

Of towns that once had the promise of a great future, Whatcom is one. It was named after a chief of the Nooksack, whose grave is a mile above the Bellingham Bay coal mine. For a short time during the Fraser River furore it had 10,000 people, and a fleet of vessels coming and going. The order of Douglas, turning traffic to Victoria, caused all the better portion of the buildings to be taken clown and removed thither. The single brick house erected by John Alexander remained, and was converted to the use of the county. Eldridge’s Sketch, MS., 31-2; Coleman, in Harper’s Magazine, xxxix. 796; Waddington, 8-9; Rossi’s Souvenirs, 156-7. After this turn in the fortunes of Whatcom it remained uninhabited, except by its owners and the coal company, for several years, or until about 1870, when the N. P. R. Co. turned attention to Bellingham Bay as a possible terminus of their road, and all the available land fronting on the bay was bought up. In 1882 the agent of a Kansas colony, looking for a location, fixed on Whatcom County and town, and made arrangements for settling there 600 immigrants. The owners of the town site agreed to donate a half-interest in the town site to the colonists, but refused after the latter had complied with the stipulations. New Whatcom was thereupon laid off on the opposite side of the creek, and also a town called Fairhaven west of that, while other colonists settled at Sehome, named after a chief of the Samish tribe, and laid off by E. C. Fitzhugh, James Tilton, and C. Vail,...

Biography of Richard Jeffs

RICHARD JEFFS. – The subject of this brief sketch was born in Westchester, Westchester county, New York, December 27, 1827, where he was brought up, working on his father’s farm until he was nineteen years of age. He then went to New York City, where he remained for eighteen months. In February, 1851, he started for California by way of Panama, arriving in San Francisco in March of that year. He started almost immediately for the mines, where he remained until 1858. During the great gold excitement of 1858-59, on the Frazer river, British Columbia, when thousands of people were rushing to the new El Dorado, Mr. Jeffs, with that spirit of adventure that has always characterized him, made his way to those then celebrated diggins, and remained there actively engaged in mining for about one year. In 1859 he removed to Whatcom, Washington Territory, where he went into the employ of Captain Henry Roder; and it was he who took to marked the first scow-load of lumber from that place. After working in different places until 1862, he purchased a farm of eight hundred acres on the White river, and followed faring until 1882. In that year the Hopgrowers Association was organized; and Mr. Jeffs was elected president of that association, and removed to Snoqualmie, Washington Territory, to manage their large ho ranch, perhaps the largest in the world, a view of which the reader will find in this work. Mr. Jeffs is one of the sterling business men of the day, noted for his sound judgment in business matters, and for his many sterling qualities of heart...

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