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West Virginia Naturalization Records

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). These naturalization records can be found on two different websites, one paid and one free. There is no difference between the indices at either location, it really depends on what software you may be using to record your family tree, as you will want to use Ancestry’s database if you’re using either their online tree or FTM and have a membership. Ancestry – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – $$$ Family Search – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – Free Barbour County WV Naturalization Law Orders, 1903-1904 Berkeley County WV Declarations of Intention, 1908-1922, v. 1 Declarations of Intention, 1922-1929, v. 2 Declarations of Intention, 1930-1978, v. 3 Naturalization Certificates, 1911-1916 Naturalization Certificates, 1917-1924 Naturalization Certificates, 1924-1929 Naturalization Lists, 1840-1991, v. 1 Naturalization Loose Papers, 1840-1905 Naturalization Petitions, 1930-1946 Naturalization Petitions, 1946-1958 Naturalization Records, 1904-1906, v. 1 Naturalization Records, 1930-1953 Naturalization Records, 1953-1991 Petition Records, 1908-1920, v. 1 Petition Records, 1921-1929, v. 2 Brooke County WV Applications for Oath of Allegiance, 1937 Declarations of Intention,...

Biography of Jacob Ramer Blackshere

Jacob Ramer Blackshere was one of the men who laid the foundation of Kansas’ great agricultural prosperity. He was a pioneer both in point of time and in point of achievement. The history of Kansas ought to give recognition and honor to such men, and that is the purpose of this brief article. One of the greatest sources of Kansas wealth is alfalfa. It is not strange, therefore, that many should have been mentioned for the premier honor of having introduced that crop into the Sunflower State. No doubt the controversy had been settled for all time in favor of the late J. R. Blackshere. All the facts necessary to substantiate this claim are in the possession of the Blackshere family and some account of his pioneer work in this direction will be found in the columns of the Topeka Daily State Journal, the issue of January 12, 1907. A paragraph from the article that appears in the Journal reads as follows: “According to P. C. Jeffrey, who had written to the State Journal, the first alfalfa seed to be brought to Kansas was in 1875 by J. R. Blackshere, who owned and lived on the Clover Cliff Ranch southwest of Elmdale, Chase County. Claims that were made for the late Harrison Parkman, former owner of Sunny Slope Farm near Emporia, will have to give precedence in favor of Mr. Blackshere, who purchased and introduced the first alfalfa seed seven years prior to the shipment brought to Sunny Slope by Mr. Parkman. Mr. Blackshere secured his seed in San Francisco through the firm of J. M. Griffith and brother...

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