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Howland Family of Duxbury, MA

HOWLAND. Arthur and Henry Howland are believed to have come to America together and probably before 1625; they appeared in Plymouth Colony in the early days of its settlement. They were members of the Society of Friends and most of their descendants for many generations were, and many at the present time are, Friends. Arthur lived for a few years in Plymouth, then became a landholder and resident of Marshfield; while Henry, the progenitor of the Ancient Dartmouth Howland family, the branch here specially considered, lived at Duxbury. The first mention of him in New England is that made in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624. Perhaps none of the colonists have a better record for intelligence, thrift, uprightness and unmixed faith in the Divine One than Henry Howland, and these virtues have permeated the lives of his posterity. In general they are a family of great respectability, and as a people thrifty, economical and good managers of finance, most of them having a fair share of this world’s goods, some amassing millions. Henry Howland was made a freeman in 1633; was chosen constable for Duxbury in 1635; bought land there in 1640; was for some years surveyor of highways; served repeatedly on the grand jury, etc. He joined the Society of Friends, perhaps 1657, and was not a little persecuted thereafter on this account. In 1652, associated with others, he bought a large tract of land in Dartmouth; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown in 1659, and in the division of 1660 he received for his share...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Frederick Slocum

Allen, Frederick Slocum, son of Holden and Mary Devoll (Slocum) Allen, was born in Westport, Bristol County, December 25, 1837. His early educational advantages were limited to the district schools of Fairhaven. Before he was quite seventeen years of age, he shipped on a whaling voyage to the Arctic Ocean, and sailed from New Bedford, November 3, 1856, in the ship “Saratoga”–Frederick Slocum, master. He was connected with the whaling business some three years and a half. This business he left in 1860. As his father held a commission as pilot for the ports of Buzzard’s Bay, he then assisted him in that business as boat-keeper for about ten years, as also previous to his whaling voyage, some five years. He then spent considerable time and money in improving windlasses. Several models were on exhibition at the National Museum at Washington. For several years he has been quite actively engaged in town affairs, and for fourteen years he has held a commission as justice of the peace. He has given special attention to the saving of life from shipwreck, and in 1887, at the International Maritime Exposition at Havre, France, he was awarded a silver medal for a reversible lifeboat. Mr. Allen was married in Martha’s Vineyard, November 1860, to Florencia C. Austin. They have one son; Frederick Allen. His residence is Cuttyhunk Island, Dukes...

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