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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied themselves into the Connecticut at the northeastern part of the town. As he was inclined to engage in the settlement of the new town, the next year (June 7, 1763) his father transferred to him as ‘a token of his...

Biographical Sketch of De Witt Clinton Dimock

This pioneer Moline business man and sterling citizen was born October 1, 1820, at Wellington, Connecticut. He came west and located at Geneseo, Illinois. in 1840, taking up his residence in Moline in 1843. His activities as a manufacturer began in 1852 when he formed a partnership with Judge John M. Gould for the making of furniture and wooden ware. On the incorporation of the firm of Dimock, Gould & Company, in 1869, he was elected its president. This position he held till 1884, when he retired from the head of the concern, retaining his connection through the office of treasurer. Mr. Dimock was also interested in a number of other successful enterprises, among which may be mentioned the First National Bank of Moline. He was one of the original stockholders of this institution and long served as a member of the board of directors. Mr. Dimock married June 17, 1843, Miss Maria H. Hubbard, daughter of Rufus Hub-bard. She was born in Bergen, Genesse County, New York. Two daughters were the issue of their union. The older, Nellie E., died when but two years of age. Florence, the younger, is the wife of E. H. Sleight, to whom she was married in 1880. Mr. Dimock was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Moline, and he and his wife are members of and liberal contributors to the support of the same. Mr. Dimock has been a strong Republican ever since that party was organized, and during the war was a staunch Union man. He died May 23,...

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