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Biography of Andrew J. Coffey

ANDREW J. COFFEY. Ozark County, Missouri, is well known for the richness of its soil, and among those industrious farmers who have assisted in making this section the rich agricultural district that it is may be mentioned Andrew J. Coffey, who was born in Ashe County, N. C., in 1833, of which State his parents, Cleveland and Susan (Hayes) Coffey, were also natives. During the early boyhood of Andrew J. Coffey, he was taken by his parents to Hawkins County, Tennessee, and soon after to Granger County, where the mother died some fifty years ago. Mr. Coffey remarried afterward and then returned to the Old North State, where he died about 1866, having been a farmer and mechanic throughout life. He was a man of much industry, led an active and upright life, and in religion was a Missionary Baptist. His father, Jesse Coffey, was an early settler of North Carolina and breathed his last in Burke County when Andrew J. was a small lad. He was of Irish ancestry, a farmer by occupation, and was a minister of the Primitive Baptist Church. The children born to Cleveland and Susan Coffey are as follows: Andrew J.; William, who was a soldier of the Confederate Army and was killed at Mission Ridge; Thomas was a Federal soldier, but nothing has been heard of him since the war; Martha died young; Susan E. is the wife of Aaron McGinnis, of Ozark County, Missouri The education and rearing which was given the average farmer’s boy of his day was given to Andrew J. Coffey, and in 1849 he came to the conclusion...

Biography of Jason F. Norman

JASON F. NORMAN. Special adaptability to any particular calling in life is the one necessary adjunct to success of a permanent kind. No matter what the vim and determination characterizing a man’s start in business, unless he is to the manner born, he will find to his sorrow that his line has been falsely cast, and the quicker he draws aside and takes up another, the better it will be for him. It has often been the case that a man will make a success of several different occupations, and this has been the experience of Jason F. Norman, who is not only engaged in general merchandising, but also in job printing and bookbinding at Romance, Missouri. He was born in Fulton County, Arkansas, in 1854, a son of Abner S. and Charlotte (Orr) Norman, the former of whom was born in Georgia in 1811, and the latter in South Carolina in 1815, their marriage occurring in the former State in 1834. Their first removal was to Arkansas about 1852, and after a short residence in Conway County they removed to Fulton County in 1862, and later to Douglas County, Missouri April 9, 1864, Mr. Norman was killed in Marion County, Arkansas, while with the Federal Army, but of which he was not a member, being a cripple. He was a farmer and school teacher, was a justice of the peace for many years in different counties, and led an active, industrious and honest life. He was a recognized leader in social and business circles, took an active interest in all public matters, and he was ever a loyal...

Biography of Judge W. N. Evans

Judge W. N. Evans, of the Twentieth Judicial District of Missouri, makes his home in the northwestern part of West Plains, where he has a handsome residence on Garfield Avenue. He is a native of Owsley County, Kentucky, born September 1, 1849, and the son of W. N. and Elizabeth (Hurst) Evans. The grandfather, John Evans, was a native of Wales, who came to this country at an early day and settled in old Virginia. Later he moved to east Tennessee and there passed the remainder of his days. He had but three children, two sons and a daughter. The father of our subject was born in east Tennessee in 1824, and his early life was spent on a farm. There he married and resided until 1849, when he moved to Kentucky, where he was among the pioneers. He followed farming there and was one of the prominent men in the county. He held a number of offices in Owsley County. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the Tenth Kentucky, Confederate army, and served in the Virginia army. Mr. Evans participated in a number of prominent engagements and was taken a prisoner of war in the latter part of 1863, being confined in the Rock Island Prison, Illinois, where he soon after died. He was always a strong Democrat and a prominent and influential man in the section in which he lived. Of the nine children born to his marriage, seven are still living. Mrs. Evans is living near Marshfield, Webster County, Missouri, and is in the enjoyment of comparatively good health. Judge W. N. Evans...

Biography of Hon. Winfield Scott Pope

For many years Winfield Scott Pope was rated as one of the most highly respected residents and most prominent attorneys of Jefferson City. As lawyer and lawmaker he left the impress of his individuality upon the history of city and state when he was called to his final rest at the age of seventy-four years. He always held to the highest standards and ethics of the profession, his success being attributable at all times to his marked capability and merit. The story of his professional rise and progress is an interesting one. He was born in Davidson county, North Carolina, July 20, 1847, his birthplace being a farm near Thomasville. His parents, Thomas and Mary Ann (Hale) Pope, were also natives of the Old North state, where their ancestors had lived for several generations. His grandfather in the paternal line was a noted Baptist preacher of North Carolina, while his great-grandfather Pope was a native of England and on coming to America landed at Nantucket, Rhode Island, but gradually made his way southward into Virginia. W infield S. Pope of this review was a descendant of George Whitefield Pope, who was a famous Baptist preacher at the time of the Revolutionary war, and of James Pope, a cousin of Alexander Pope. George Whitefield Pope was a very outspoken man who before the colonies entered upon armed conflict with England was condemned to be shot for treason because of his utterances against the British government. He strongly advocated American independence and it was because of this that he was condemned. However, he escaped and thus managed to save his life....

Biography of Isaac A. Tyndall

ISAAC A. TYNDALL. The gentleman who occupies the honorable position of assessor of Christian County, Missouri, was first elected to that office in 1890, and reelected two years later. He is one of the most prominent citizens, and has held many official positions of trust. Mr. Tyndall was born in Christian (then Greene) County, May 10, 1856. His parents, William V. and Hannah (Huff) Tyndall, were natives of Georgia and Arkansas, respectively, the father born April 19, 1818, and the mother in Fulton County. Our subject’s great-grandfather came from England to this country at an early date, and settled at Baltimore, Md. His son, the grandfather of our subject, was a soldier in the War of 1812. William V. Tyndall, father of the subject, remained in his native State until three years of age, and, when grown, or in 1841, he emigrated to Missouri. He first settled in Christian County, about two miles southeast of Sparta, and bought a farm, on which he remained for eight years. Thence he moved to a farm four miles northeast of that town, and on this passed the remainder of his days, dying February 15, 1893, of pneumonia. He was a hearty, strong man up to the time of his death. He was also a good man, for his career was marked by uprightness and truth, and his life was filled with acts of usefulness. He was one of the pioneers of this section, and a man highly esteemed by all. He came to this county on horseback, and after settling here married Miss Huff, daughter of Samuel Huff, who was a native...

Biography of James Hailey

JAMES HAILEY. This gentleman is the oldest resident of Ava, and during the long term of years that he has spent in this section, his good name has remained untarnished and he has won for himself many friends. He was born in Bedford County, Tennessee, February 7, 1824, a son of Tavner and Joyce (Tomison) Hailey, the former of whom was born in Henry County, Virginia, was an early pioneer of Tennessee, and in 1839 settled in Webster County, Missouri, where he followed the occupation of farming until his death in 1867. He was a Whig in politics. His wife was born in Virginia and died in 1869, the daughter of Peter Tomison, a Virginian who removed to Tennessee. The paternal grandfather, James Hailey, was of English descent and a native of Virginia, and was a soldier of the Revolution. Fourteen children were born to Tavner Hailey and wife, only two of whom are living, James and Joyce (Mrs. Johnson) of Webster County. Fourteen members of this family reached maturity: Lucy, Louis P., Elizabeth, Susan, James, Peter F., Sarah, Joyce, Eliza, Joseph, Judy, Alice, Temperance and Tavner C.; all the sons were soldiers in Missouri regiments during the Civil War. The schooldays of James Hailey were spent in Tennessee and in Missouri, and were limited to the common schools. In 1847 he began to do for himself and was married the same year to Mary C. Rowe, who was born and reared in Kentucky, and who came to Missouri in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Hailey lived in Webster County until 1853, when they settled in the northern...

Biography of Judge James P. Ince

JUDGE JAMES P. INCE. This gentleman is the associate judge of the Western District of Douglas County, Missouri, and no better man for the position could be found than he, for he is intelligent, well posted, imbued with the milk of human kindness, and has always shown the utmost impartiality in his decisions. The Judge has resided in Missouri since 1843, and has been a resident of Douglas County since 1862, taking up his abode in the vicinity of Rome. He was born in Overton County, Tennessee, March 28, 1828, a son of John and Elizabeth (Clark) Ince, the former of whom was born in Ireland and came to the United States in his youth, locating in South Carolina, where he lived for about five years. He then spent eight years in Overton County, Tennessee, after which he became a resident of Lawrence County, Arkansas, and there was called from life about 1833. After his death his widow returned to Tennessee, and in 1843 came to Missouri and settled in Greene County, about twenty miles south of Springfield, where she resided until 1863, when she moved to Pike County, and died in 1887. She was a native of the Old North State and a daughter of John Clark, who lived and died in that State, a farmer. The subject of this sketch was one of eight children: Thomas, Jesse, Matthew, Levi, Harvey, Agnes, James, John. The Judge is supposed to be the only member of the family living. He was sixteen years old when he went to Greene County, Missouri, and he received no schooling save what could be...

Biography of Anselm C. Bralley

ANSELM C. BRALLEY. This gentleman has been a useful citizen of Douglas County, Missouri, since 1865, but was born in Greene County, Missouri, October 7, 1839, a son of Jonathan and Margaret (Bogel) Bralley and grandson of James Bralley, who came to this country from Ireland. They took up their residence in Virginia, and there Jonathan Bralley was born, reared, and moved to Missouri, in 1839, after which he moved to Greene County, Missouri, and settled on the James River near Galloway. Later he removed to Webster County and there died in the spring of 1866. He was a Democrat in politics and for many years held the office of justice of the peace, and socially was a Mason. He was quite a hunter in his youth, and was successful in amassing a comfortable fortune. His wife was born in Virginia also, and was the only one of her family to come to Missouri. She died in December, 1892, having become the mother of twelve children: Sanders was a soldier of the Twenty-Fourth Missouri Infantry and died at the age of twenty-five years; Elizabeth became the wife of Melvin Smith and died at the age of forty-five years; Anselm C.;John C., who died at about the age of twenty years in Lebanon, Missouri, while a member of the State Militia during the war; Franklin was about eighteen years old at the time of his death; Louise is living on the old home farm in Webster County; Oliver is married and lives on the old home farm; George is also there; Margaret J. and Guy. Two children died young. The...

Biography of Judge W. G. Mathes

JUDGE W. G. MATHES. Reynolds County, Missouri, has the distinction of being the place where, on September 4, 1839, Judge W. G. Mathes came into this world to make a record for integrity and uprightness which will be remembered as long as Stone County lasts. For over fifty years he has resided in this county, is a representative citizen of the same, and perhaps has done as much for its advancement as any other man. His parents, David and Elizabeth (Allen) Mathes, were natives of Warren County, Tennessee The father was reared in that State, and in 1843 came to Missouri, where he passed the closing scenes of his life. The mother moved to Stone County the same year that he died and settled on what is known as the McCord farm, where she resided about sixteen years. Her family consisted of these children: James, Polly, Rebecca, Nancy, Elizabeth, John, William, Wilson, Margaret, W. G. Mathes. (the subject of this sketch) and Minerva. The mother died about 1867. She was a member of the Baptist Church, in which the father also held membership. He was a lifelong farmer, and, in the early settlement of this county, underwent many hardships and privations. This family is of Scotch-Irish origin, and, on the paternal side, descendants of a soldier of the Revolution and of the Black Hawk War. For the father’s service in the former war the mother secured a land warrant. The Allens were early settlers of Tennessee. Our subject was but an infant when the family moved to Stone County, and here he grew to sturdy manhood. On account of...

Biography of Prof. J. M. Johnson

PROF. J. M. JOHNSON. This gentleman has resided in Christian County for the past six years, and though young, he is full of energy, business qualification and thoroughly fitted for the drug business which he is now following. He is a native of Webster County, Missouri, born February 24, 1862, but was reared principally in Wright County, this State. He is a son of J. C. and Mary (Russell) Johnson and the grandson of Spencer Johnson who was a Virginian by birth but of Scotch-Irish origin. The latter was an early pioneer of Tennessee, and some of the members of this family were active in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. J. C. Johnson and his mother, who was a widow at that time, came to Missouri as early as 1832, about the time the Indians were moved westward by the Government, and settled in Wright, now Webster County, four miles from Seymour. There they resided until the breaking out of the Civil War, then moved to Arkansas. The father of our subject enlisted with Gen. Price and was with him in the Arkansas campaign and in the raid through Missouri. Previous to this he was married in Webster County to Miss Russell, and after cessation of hostilities he returned to Wright County. He participated in a number of hard-fought battles and was a fearless soldier. He and his wife are still living on the old farm in Wright County and are well respected in the community. The nine children born to them were named in the order of their births as follows: J. M., subject;...
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