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Biography of William Alfred Clark, A. M., M. D.

It is seldom that one attains prominence along several lines, but Dr. William Alfred Clark of Jefferson City is regarded as one of the eminent surgeons of the state and in 1918 served as president of the Missouri state board of health, while in Masonic circles he has also been accorded a place of distinction and leadership, having been grand master of the order in Missouri in 1917 and 1918. He is numbered among Missouri’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Clarksburg, Moniteau county, September 11, 1865. He was the eldest of ten children, four sons and six daughters. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish but when they migrated to America is not definitely known. The first authentic knowledge concerning their residence in this country is that they went to Kentucky from Guilford Court House, North Carolina, and in 1833, the grandfather of Dr. Clark left Logan county, Kentucky, and drove across the country in an ox wagon, settling in Moniteau county, Missouri. He took up his abode on the broad prairie where the village of Clarksburg now stands and the town was named in his honor. The doctor’s father, George T. Clark, was born in Kentucky in 1830 and passed away about 1893. He lived most of his life in Clarksburg and married Mary B. Yancey, a descendant of Leighton Yancey, who migrated from Virginia to Missouri and was one of the pioneer settlers of Howard county, his farm being the location of the town of Roanoke. A number of the family still live in that locality, and others are near Armstrong and in that vicinity. The village of...

Biography of William H. Thompson

William H. Thompson of Ogden first knew Champaign County in the years just before the outbreak of the Civil War, when most of this section of Illinois was a country of swamp and prairie and when its magnificent development had hardly begun. Mr. Thompson’s individual career has been a factor in the improvement and development of Champaign County farm land, and out of that work he has acquired a commendable degree of prosperity that now enables him to live in comfort and plenty. Mr. Thompson was born at Waynesburg in Greene County, Pennsylvania, a son of Andrew J. and Catherine (Shape) Thompson. He was one of a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, who received their education in the district schools. In 1859, when William H. Thompson was fourteen years of age, the family came to Illinois and settled east of Homer in Champaign County. They were pioneers here and William H. Thompson grew up acquainted with the hardships and privations endured by the early settlers. At the age of twenty-one he married Valencia Eice. She was born in the Blue Grass State of Kentucky. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Thompson located at Burr Oak, Illinois, on rented land. There they began to carve the future according to their own desires and ability, and for a number of years they lived on a virgin prairie looking out over a scene of high prairie grass alternating with wet sloughs. Mr. Thompson by his first marriage became the father of three children. The daughter Ora Lee died at the age of ten months. The other two children...

Biography of John H. Johnson

John H. Johnson (deceased), farmer and minister; born in Washington Co., Penn., Dec. 12, 1812, where he attended school in his youth-the last few years at the college at Waynesburg, Penn.; after which he was licensed as a minister of the C. P. Church, officiating as circuit preacher until his removal to Ohio, where he was settled as local preacher for three years, until his removal to Coles Co., Ill., about the year 1854, where he first settled as Pastor of the C. P. Church in Ashmore Tp. for several years; then in Morgan Tp. until 1868; at the above date, he emigrated to Jasper Co., Mo., where he purchased ninety acres of land, upon which he labored while not engaged in his ministerial labors, until the fall of 1877, when he removed to Carthage, Mo., after renting his farm, that he might have better facilities for the education of his daughter; here he lived until his decease, which occurred Jan. 31,1878, after an illness of ten days; his remains were brought back to Coles Co., Ill., and buried in the beautiful cemetery near St. Omer, Ashmore Tp., by the side of his first wife, to whom he was married in Pennsylvania; her maiden name was Lucinda Hamson; she emigrated to Illinois with him, and died during his ministerial labors in Ashmore Tp; his marriage with Nancy (Rardin) Gollady was celebrated Feb. 13, 1856; she was a sister of John and Jacob L. Rardin; born in Campbell Co., Ky., April 22, 1824, and emigrated with her parents, Samuel and Catharine Rardin, to Morgan Tp. in the fail of 1842;...

Biography of William C. Hook

William C. Hook, United States Circuit Judge of the Eighth Judicial Circuit, had been a resident of Leavenworth since childhood, and his people have some interesting associations with Kansas in the territorial as well as the later period. Enos and Dawson Adams Hook, brothers, the former the father of Judge Hook and the latter an uncle, came to Kansas when it was a territory and had an active part in the upbuilding of the community in and around Leavenworth. They were the sons of John and Nancy (Adams) Hook. The mother was of the old Pennsylvania family of Adams. The children of John and Nancy Hook were Enos, Dawson, Adams, William and Caroline. The son, William, became an officer in the Union army during the Civil war, and after the war located in Arkansas. Caroline married Mr. Edmiston, a Cumberland Presbyterian minister, and lived in Southwestern Missouri. John Hook, the father of these children, died about 1839 when a comparatively young man. His widow survived him many years and passed away at Leavenworth. Enos Hook was the first of the family to come West. That was in 1854, the year the Kansas-Nebraska bill was passed, which precipitated the great conflict over the settlements of Kansas and Nebraska. He spent only a short time in Kansas, went East, and came back prepared to make Kansas Territory his permanent base of operations. His brother, Dawson A., joined him about that time. They were both strong free state men, and their presence in Kansas may have been accounted for partly by the struggle between the free-soil and pro-slavery elements. Enos and Dawson...

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